Mock sample for your project: AuthorizationManagementClient API

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AuthorizationManagementClient

azure.com

Version: 2018-01-01-preview


Use this API in your project

Start working with "AuthorizationManagementClient API" right away by using this ready-to-use mock sample. API mocking can greatly speed up your application development by removing all the tedious tasks or issues: API key provisioning, account creation, unplanned downtime, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

Role based access control provides you a way to apply granular level policy administration down to individual resources or resource groups. These operations allow you to manage role definitions. A role definition describes the set of actions that can be performed on resources.

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