Mock sample for your project: Amazon Cognito Sync API

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Amazon Cognito Sync

amazonaws.com

Version: 2014-06-30


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Speed up your application development by using "Amazon Cognito Sync API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and allow you to stop relying on an external API to get the job done. No more API keys to provision, accesses to configure or unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

Amazon Cognito Sync Amazon Cognito Sync provides an AWS service and client library that enable cross-device syncing of application-related user data. High-level client libraries are available for both iOS and Android. You can use these libraries to persist data locally so that it's available even if the device is offline. Developer credentials don't need to be stored on the mobile device to access the service. You can use Amazon Cognito to obtain a normalized user ID and credentials. User data is persisted in a dataset that can store up to 1 MB of key-value pairs, and you can have up to 20 datasets per user identity. With Amazon Cognito Sync, the data stored for each identity is accessible only to credentials assigned to that identity. In order to use the Cognito Sync service, you need to make API calls using credentials retrieved with Amazon Cognito Identity service. If you want to use Cognito Sync in an Android or iOS application, you will probably want to make API calls via the AWS Mobile SDK. To learn more, see the Developer Guide for Android and the Developer Guide for iOS.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS CodeDeploy

AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy is a deployment service that automates application deployments to Amazon EC2 instances, on-premises instances running in your own facility, serverless AWS Lambda functions, or applications in an Amazon ECS service. You can deploy a nearly unlimited variety of application content, such as an updated Lambda function, updated applications in an Amazon ECS service, code, web and configuration files, executables, packages, scripts, multimedia files, and so on. AWS CodeDeploy can deploy application content stored in Amazon S3 buckets, GitHub repositories, or Bitbucket repositories. You do not need to make changes to your existing code before you can use AWS CodeDeploy. AWS CodeDeploy makes it easier for you to rapidly release new features, helps you avoid downtime during application deployment, and handles the complexity of updating your applications, without many of the risks associated with error-prone manual deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Components Use the information in this guide to help you work with the following AWS CodeDeploy components: Application : A name that uniquely identifies the application you want to deploy. AWS CodeDeploy uses this name, which functions as a container, to ensure the correct combination of revision, deployment configuration, and deployment group are referenced during a deployment. Deployment group : A set of individual instances, CodeDeploy Lambda deployment configuration settings, or an Amazon ECS service and network details. A Lambda deployment group specifies how to route traffic to a new version of a Lambda function. An Amazon ECS deployment group specifies the service created in Amazon ECS to deploy, a load balancer, and a listener to reroute production traffic to an updated containerized application. An EC2/On-premises deployment group contains individually tagged instances, Amazon EC2 instances in Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, or both. All deployment groups can specify optional trigger, alarm, and rollback settings. Deployment configuration : A set of deployment rules and deployment success and failure conditions used by AWS CodeDeploy during a deployment. Deployment : The process and the components used when updating a Lambda function, a containerized application in an Amazon ECS service, or of installing content on one or more instances. Application revisions : For an AWS Lambda deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Lambda function to be updated and one or more functions to validate deployment lifecycle events. For an Amazon ECS deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Amazon ECS task definition, container, and port where production traffic is rerouted. For an EC2/On-premises deployment, this is an archive file that contains source content—source code, webpages, executable files, and deployment scripts—along with an AppSpec file. Revisions are stored in Amazon S3 buckets or GitHub repositories. For Amazon S3, a revision is uniquely identified by its Amazon S3 object key and its ETag, version, or both. For GitHub, a revision is uniquely identified by its commit ID. This guide also contains information to help you get details about the instances in your deployments, to make on-premises instances available for AWS CodeDeploy deployments, to get details about a Lambda function deployment, and to get details about Amazon ECS service deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Information Resources AWS CodeDeploy User Guide AWS CodeDeploy API Reference Guide AWS CLI Reference for AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy Developer Forum

Amazon CloudWatch

Amazon CloudWatch monitors your Amazon Web Services (Amazon Web Services) resources and the applications you run on Amazon Web Services in real time. You can use CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, which are the variables you want to measure for your resources and applications. CloudWatch alarms send notifications or automatically change the resources you are monitoring based on rules that you define. For example, you can monitor the CPU usage and disk reads and writes of your Amazon EC2 instances. Then, use this data to determine whether you should launch additional instances to handle increased load. You can also use this data to stop under-used instances to save money. In addition to monitoring the built-in metrics that come with Amazon Web Services, you can monitor your own custom metrics. With CloudWatch, you gain system-wide visibility into resource utilization, application performance, and operational health.

AWS IoT Secure Tunneling

AWS IoT Secure Tunneling AWS IoT Secure Tunnling enables you to create remote connections to devices deployed in the field. For more information about how AWS IoT Secure Tunneling works, see AWS IoT Secure Tunneling.

AWS Auto Scaling Plans

AWS Auto Scaling Use AWS Auto Scaling to create scaling plans for your applications to automatically scale your scalable AWS resources. API Summary You can use the AWS Auto Scaling service API to accomplish the following tasks: Create and manage scaling plans Define target tracking scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources based on utilization Scale Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups using predictive scaling and dynamic scaling to scale your Amazon EC2 capacity faster Set minimum and maximum capacity limits Retrieve information on existing scaling plans Access current forecast data and historical forecast data for up to 56 days previous To learn more about AWS Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for AWS Auto Scaling actions, see the AWS Auto Scaling User Guide.

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles Welcome to the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API Reference. This guide provides information about the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API, including supported operations, data types, parameters, and schemas. Amazon Connect Customer Profiles is a unified customer profile for your contact center that has pre-built connectors powered by AppFlow that make it easy to combine customer information from third party applications, such as Salesforce (CRM), ServiceNow (ITSM), and your enterprise resource planning (ERP), with contact history from your Amazon Connect contact center. If you're new to Amazon Connect , you might find it helpful to also review the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide.

AWS IoT Data Plane

IoT data IoT data enables secure, bi-directional communication between Internet-connected things (such as sensors, actuators, embedded devices, or smart appliances) and the Amazon Web Services cloud. It implements a broker for applications and things to publish messages over HTTP (Publish) and retrieve, update, and delete shadows. A shadow is a persistent representation of your things and their state in the Amazon Web Services cloud. Find the endpoint address for actions in IoT data by running this CLI command: aws iot describe-endpoint --endpoint-type iot:Data-ATS The service name used by Amazon Web ServicesSignature Version 4 to sign requests is: iotdevicegateway.

AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

AWS IoT Events Data

AWS IoT Events monitors your equipment or device fleets for failures or changes in operation, and triggers actions when such events occur. You can use AWS IoT Events Data API commands to send inputs to detectors, list detectors, and view or update a detector's status. For more information, see What is AWS IoT Events? in the AWS IoT Events Developer Guide.

AWS Direct Connect

Direct Connect links your internal network to an Direct Connect location over a standard Ethernet fiber-optic cable. One end of the cable is connected to your router, the other to an Direct Connect router. With this connection in place, you can create virtual interfaces directly to the Cloud (for example, to Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3) and to Amazon VPC, bypassing Internet service providers in your network path. A connection provides access to all Regions except the China (Beijing) and (China) Ningxia Regions. Amazon Web Services resources in the China Regions can only be accessed through locations associated with those Regions.

AWS Ground Station

Welcome to the AWS Ground Station API Reference. AWS Ground Station is a fully managed service that enables you to control satellite communications, downlink and process satellite data, and scale your satellite operations efficiently and cost-effectively without having to build or manage your own ground station infrastructure.
The Amazon Braket API Reference provides information about the operations and structures supported in Amazon Braket.

Amazon FSx

Amazon FSx is a fully managed service that makes it easy for storage and application administrators to launch and use shared file storage.

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