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AWS Cost and Usage Report Service

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-01-06


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Speed up your application development by using "AWS Cost and Usage Report Service API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

The AWS Cost and Usage Report API enables you to programmatically create, query, and delete AWS Cost and Usage report definitions. AWS Cost and Usage reports track the monthly AWS costs and usage associated with your AWS account. The report contains line items for each unique combination of AWS product, usage type, and operation that your AWS account uses. You can configure the AWS Cost and Usage report to show only the data that you want, using the AWS Cost and Usage API. Service Endpoint The AWS Cost and Usage Report API provides the following endpoint: cur.us-east-1.amazonaws.com

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