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AWS Systems Manager Incident Manager

amazonaws.com

Version: 2018-05-10


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Description

AWS Systems Manager Incident Manager is an incident management console designed to help users mitigate and recover from incidents affecting their AWS-hosted applications. An incident is any unplanned interruption or reduction in quality of services. Incident Manager increases incident resolution by notifying responders of impact, highlighting relevant troubleshooting data, and providing collaboration tools to get services back up and running. To achieve the primary goal of reducing the time-to-resolution of critical incidents, Incident Manager automates response plans and enables responder team escalation.

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Amazon Interactive Video Service

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

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AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

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