Mock sample for your project: Amazon Kinesis API

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Amazon Kinesis

amazonaws.com

Version: 2013-12-02


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "Amazon Kinesis API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

Amazon Kinesis Data Streams Service API Reference Amazon Kinesis Data Streams is a managed service that scales elastically for real-time processing of streaming big data.

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Idempotent create APIs with a client token: CreateEnvironmentTemplateVersion CreateServiceTemplateVersion CreateEnvironmentAccountConnection Idempotent create APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request with an API from this group, and the original resource hasn't been modified, the retry succeeds without performing any further actions other than returning the original resource detail data in the response. If the original resource has been modified, the retry throws a ConflictException. If you retry with different input parameters, the retry throws a ValidationException with an IdempotentParameterMismatch error. Idempotent create APIs: CreateEnvironmentTemplate CreateServiceTemplate CreateEnvironment CreateService Idempotent delete APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: When you retry the request with an API from this group and the resource was deleted, its metadata is returned in the response. 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