Mock sample for your project: AWS Marketplace Catalog Service API

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AWS Marketplace Catalog Service

amazonaws.com

Version: 2018-09-17


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "AWS Marketplace Catalog Service API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and allow you to stop relying on an external API to get the job done. No more API keys to provision, accesses to configure or unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

Catalog API actions allow you to manage your entities through list, describe, and update capabilities. An entity can be a product or an offer on AWS Marketplace. You can automate your entity update process by integrating the AWS Marketplace Catalog API with your AWS Marketplace product build or deployment pipelines. You can also create your own applications on top of the Catalog API to manage your products on AWS Marketplace.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Amazon Elastic Container Registry Public

Amazon Elastic Container Registry Public Amazon Elastic Container Registry (Amazon ECR) is a managed container image registry service. Amazon ECR provides both public and private registries to host your container images. You can use the familiar Docker CLI, or their preferred client, to push, pull, and manage images. Amazon ECR provides a secure, scalable, and reliable registry for your Docker or Open Container Initiative (OCI) images. Amazon ECR supports public repositories with this API. For information about the Amazon ECR API for private repositories, see Amazon Elastic Container Registry API Reference.

AWS SSO Identity Store

The AWS Single Sign-On (SSO) Identity Store service provides a single place to retrieve all of your identities (users and groups). For more information about AWS, see the AWS Single Sign-On User Guide.

Amazon Elastic Block Store

You can use the Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) direct APIs to create Amazon EBS snapshots, write data directly to your snapshots, read data on your snapshots, and identify the differences or changes between two snapshots. If you’re an independent software vendor (ISV) who offers backup services for Amazon EBS, the EBS direct APIs make it more efficient and cost-effective to track incremental changes on your Amazon EBS volumes through snapshots. This can be done without having to create new volumes from snapshots, and then use Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances to compare the differences. You can create incremental snapshots directly from data on-premises into volumes and the cloud to use for quick disaster recovery. With the ability to write and read snapshots, you can write your on-premises data to an snapshot during a disaster. Then after recovery, you can restore it back to Amazon Web Services or on-premises from the snapshot. You no longer need to build and maintain complex mechanisms to copy data to and from Amazon EBS. This API reference provides detailed information about the actions, data types, parameters, and errors of the EBS direct APIs. For more information about the elements that make up the EBS direct APIs, and examples of how to use them effectively, see Accessing the Contents of an Amazon EBS Snapshot in the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud User Guide. For more information about the supported Amazon Web Services Regions, endpoints, and service quotas for the EBS direct APIs, see Amazon Elastic Block Store Endpoints and Quotas in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

Amazon Managed Blockchain

Amazon Managed Blockchain is a fully managed service for creating and managing blockchain networks using open-source frameworks. Blockchain allows you to build applications where multiple parties can securely and transparently run transactions and share data without the need for a trusted, central authority. Managed Blockchain supports the Hyperledger Fabric and Ethereum open-source frameworks. Because of fundamental differences between the frameworks, some API actions or data types may only apply in the context of one framework and not the other. For example, actions related to Hyperledger Fabric network members such as CreateMember and DeleteMember do not apply to Ethereum. The description for each action indicates the framework or frameworks to which it applies. Data types and properties that apply only in the context of a particular framework are similarly indicated.
Glue Defines the public endpoint for the Glue service.

AWS Service Catalog

AWS Service Catalog AWS Service Catalog enables organizations to create and manage catalogs of IT services that are approved for AWS. To get the most out of this documentation, you should be familiar with the terminology discussed in AWS Service Catalog Concepts.

AWSKendraFrontendService

Amazon Kendra is a service for indexing large document sets.

Elastic Load Balancing

Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer can distribute incoming traffic across your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered instances and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy instances. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer and a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the instances. Elastic Load Balancing supports three types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. You can select a load balancer based on your application needs. For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. This reference covers the 2012-06-01 API, which supports Classic Load Balancers. The 2015-12-01 API supports Application Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers. To get started, create a load balancer with one or more listeners using CreateLoadBalancer. Register your instances with the load balancer using RegisterInstancesWithLoadBalancer. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds with a 200 OK response code.

AWS Network Firewall

This is the API Reference for AWS Network Firewall. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Network Firewall API actions, data types, and errors. The REST API requires you to handle connection details, such as calculating signatures, handling request retries, and error handling. For general information about using the AWS REST APIs, see AWS APIs. To access Network Firewall using the REST API endpoint: https://network-firewall..amazonaws.com Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that's tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. For descriptions of Network Firewall features, including and step-by-step instructions on how to use them through the Network Firewall console, see the Network Firewall Developer Guide. Network Firewall is a stateful, managed, network firewall and intrusion detection and prevention service for Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC). With Network Firewall, you can filter traffic at the perimeter of your VPC. This includes filtering traffic going to and coming from an internet gateway, NAT gateway, or over VPN or AWS Direct Connect. Network Firewall uses rules that are compatible with Suricata, a free, open source intrusion detection system (IDS) engine. For information about Suricata, see the Suricata website. You can use Network Firewall to monitor and protect your VPC traffic in a number of ways. The following are just a few examples: Allow domains or IP addresses for known AWS service endpoints, such as Amazon S3, and block all other forms of traffic. Use custom lists of known bad domains to limit the types of domain names that your applications can access. Perform deep packet inspection on traffic entering or leaving your VPC. Use stateful protocol detection to filter protocols like HTTPS, regardless of the port used. To enable Network Firewall for your VPCs, you perform steps in both Amazon VPC and in Network Firewall. For information about using Amazon VPC, see Amazon VPC User Guide. To start using Network Firewall, do the following: (Optional) If you don't already have a VPC that you want to protect, create it in Amazon VPC. In Amazon VPC, in each Availability Zone where you want to have a firewall endpoint, create a subnet for the sole use of Network Firewall. In Network Firewall, create stateless and stateful rule groups, to define the components of the network traffic filtering behavior that you want your firewall to have. In Network Firewall, create a firewall policy that uses your rule groups and specifies additional default traffic filtering behavior. In Network Firewall, create a firewall and specify your new firewall policy and VPC subnets. Network Firewall creates a firewall endpoint in each subnet that you specify, with the behavior that's defined in the firewall policy. In Amazon VPC, use ingress routing enhancements to route traffic through the new firewall endpoints.

Amazon Interactive Video Service

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

AWS Transfer Family

Amazon Web Services Transfer Family is a fully managed service that enables the transfer of files over the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), File Transfer Protocol over SSL (FTPS), or Secure Shell (SSH) File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) directly into and out of Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3). Amazon Web Services helps you seamlessly migrate your file transfer workflows to Amazon Web Services Transfer Family by integrating with existing authentication systems, and providing DNS routing with Amazon Route 53 so nothing changes for your customers and partners, or their applications. With your data in Amazon S3, you can use it with Amazon Web Services services for processing, analytics, machine learning, and archiving. Getting started with Amazon Web Services Transfer Family is easy since there is no infrastructure to buy and set up.

AWS Marketplace Entitlement Service

AWS Marketplace Entitlement Service This reference provides descriptions of the AWS Marketplace Entitlement Service API. AWS Marketplace Entitlement Service is used to determine the entitlement of a customer to a given product. An entitlement represents capacity in a product owned by the customer. For example, a customer might own some number of users or seats in an SaaS application or some amount of data capacity in a multi-tenant database. Getting Entitlement Records GetEntitlements - Gets the entitlements for a Marketplace product.

Other APIs in the same category

Amazon Elastic Block Store

You can use the Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) direct APIs to create Amazon EBS snapshots, write data directly to your snapshots, read data on your snapshots, and identify the differences or changes between two snapshots. If you’re an independent software vendor (ISV) who offers backup services for Amazon EBS, the EBS direct APIs make it more efficient and cost-effective to track incremental changes on your Amazon EBS volumes through snapshots. This can be done without having to create new volumes from snapshots, and then use Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances to compare the differences. You can create incremental snapshots directly from data on-premises into volumes and the cloud to use for quick disaster recovery. With the ability to write and read snapshots, you can write your on-premises data to an snapshot during a disaster. Then after recovery, you can restore it back to Amazon Web Services or on-premises from the snapshot. You no longer need to build and maintain complex mechanisms to copy data to and from Amazon EBS. This API reference provides detailed information about the actions, data types, parameters, and errors of the EBS direct APIs. For more information about the elements that make up the EBS direct APIs, and examples of how to use them effectively, see Accessing the Contents of an Amazon EBS Snapshot in the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud User Guide. For more information about the supported Amazon Web Services Regions, endpoints, and service quotas for the EBS direct APIs, see Amazon Elastic Block Store Endpoints and Quotas in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

Meshery API.

meshery.local
the purpose of this application is to provide an application
that is using plain go code to define an API
This should demonstrate all the possible comment annotations
that are available to turn go code into a fully compliant swagger 2.0 spec

AWS CodeDeploy

AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy is a deployment service that automates application deployments to Amazon EC2 instances, on-premises instances running in your own facility, serverless AWS Lambda functions, or applications in an Amazon ECS service. You can deploy a nearly unlimited variety of application content, such as an updated Lambda function, updated applications in an Amazon ECS service, code, web and configuration files, executables, packages, scripts, multimedia files, and so on. AWS CodeDeploy can deploy application content stored in Amazon S3 buckets, GitHub repositories, or Bitbucket repositories. You do not need to make changes to your existing code before you can use AWS CodeDeploy. AWS CodeDeploy makes it easier for you to rapidly release new features, helps you avoid downtime during application deployment, and handles the complexity of updating your applications, without many of the risks associated with error-prone manual deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Components Use the information in this guide to help you work with the following AWS CodeDeploy components: Application : A name that uniquely identifies the application you want to deploy. AWS CodeDeploy uses this name, which functions as a container, to ensure the correct combination of revision, deployment configuration, and deployment group are referenced during a deployment. Deployment group : A set of individual instances, CodeDeploy Lambda deployment configuration settings, or an Amazon ECS service and network details. A Lambda deployment group specifies how to route traffic to a new version of a Lambda function. An Amazon ECS deployment group specifies the service created in Amazon ECS to deploy, a load balancer, and a listener to reroute production traffic to an updated containerized application. An EC2/On-premises deployment group contains individually tagged instances, Amazon EC2 instances in Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, or both. All deployment groups can specify optional trigger, alarm, and rollback settings. Deployment configuration : A set of deployment rules and deployment success and failure conditions used by AWS CodeDeploy during a deployment. Deployment : The process and the components used when updating a Lambda function, a containerized application in an Amazon ECS service, or of installing content on one or more instances. Application revisions : For an AWS Lambda deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Lambda function to be updated and one or more functions to validate deployment lifecycle events. For an Amazon ECS deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Amazon ECS task definition, container, and port where production traffic is rerouted. For an EC2/On-premises deployment, this is an archive file that contains source contentβ€”source code, webpages, executable files, and deployment scriptsβ€”along with an AppSpec file. Revisions are stored in Amazon S3 buckets or GitHub repositories. For Amazon S3, a revision is uniquely identified by its Amazon S3 object key and its ETag, version, or both. For GitHub, a revision is uniquely identified by its commit ID. This guide also contains information to help you get details about the instances in your deployments, to make on-premises instances available for AWS CodeDeploy deployments, to get details about a Lambda function deployment, and to get details about Amazon ECS service deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Information Resources AWS CodeDeploy User Guide AWS CodeDeploy API Reference Guide AWS CLI Reference for AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy Developer Forum

BlueprintClient

azure.com
Azure Blueprints Client provides access to blueprint definitions, assignments, and artifacts, and related blueprint operations.

Amazon Connect Service

Amazon Connect is a cloud-based contact center solution that you use to set up and manage a customer contact center and provide reliable customer engagement at any scale. Amazon Connect provides metrics and real-time reporting that enable you to optimize contact routing. You can also resolve customer issues more efficiently by getting customers in touch with the appropriate agents. There are limits to the number of Amazon Connect resources that you can create. There are also limits to the number of requests that you can make per second. For more information, see Amazon Connect Service Quotas in the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide. You can connect programmatically to an AWS service by using an endpoint. For a list of Amazon Connect endpoints, see Amazon Connect Endpoints. Working with contact flows? Check out the Amazon Connect Flow language.

AWS Amplify

Amplify enables developers to develop and deploy cloud-powered mobile and web apps. The Amplify Console provides a continuous delivery and hosting service for web applications. For more information, see the Amplify Console User Guide. The Amplify Framework is a comprehensive set of SDKs, libraries, tools, and documentation for client app development. For more information, see the Amplify Framework.

Amazon Prometheus Service

Amazon Managed Service for Prometheus

AWSServerlessApplicationRepository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository makes it easy for developers and enterprises to quickly find
and deploy serverless applications in the AWS Cloud. For more information about serverless applications,
see Serverless Computing and Applications on the AWS website. The AWS Serverless Application Repository is deeply integrated with the AWS Lambda console, so that developers of
all levels can get started with serverless computing without needing to learn anything new. You can use category
keywords to browse for applications such as web and mobile backends, data processing applications, or chatbots.
You can also search for applications by name, publisher, or event source. To use an application, you simply choose it,
configure any required fields, and deploy it with a few clicks. You can also easily publish applications, sharing them publicly with the community at large, or privately
within your team or across your organization. To publish a serverless application (or app), you can use the
AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or AWS SDKs to upload the code. Along with the
code, you upload a simple manifest file, also known as the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) template.
For more information about AWS SAM, see AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) on the AWS Labs
GitHub repository. The AWS Serverless Application Repository Developer Guide contains more information about the two developer
experiences available:
Consuming Applications – Browse for applications and view information about them, including
source code and readme files. Also install, configure, and deploy applications of your choosing.
Publishing Applications – Configure and upload applications to make them available to other
developers, and publish new versions of applications.

AWS Identity and Access Management

Identity and Access Management Identity and Access Management (IAM) is a web service for securely controlling access to Amazon Web Services services. With IAM, you can centrally manage users, security credentials such as access keys, and permissions that control which Amazon Web Services resources users and applications can access. For more information about IAM, see Identity and Access Management (IAM) and the Identity and Access Management User Guide.

Amazon QLDB Session

The transactional data APIs for Amazon QLDB Instead of interacting directly with this API, we recommend using the QLDB driver or the QLDB shell to execute data transactions on a ledger. If you are working with an AWS SDK, use the QLDB driver. The driver provides a high-level abstraction layer above this QLDB Session data plane and manages SendCommand API calls for you. For information and a list of supported programming languages, see Getting started with the driver in the Amazon QLDB Developer Guide. If you are working with the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), use the QLDB shell. The shell is a command line interface that uses the QLDB driver to interact with a ledger. For information, see Accessing Amazon QLDB using the QLDB shell.

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.