Mock sample for your project: AWS Elemental MediaStore API

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AWS Elemental MediaStore

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-09-01


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Description

An AWS Elemental MediaStore container is a namespace that holds folders and objects. You use a container endpoint to create, read, and delete objects.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Organizations

AWS Organizations is a web service that enables you to consolidate your multiple AWS accounts into an organization and centrally manage your accounts and their resources. This guide provides descriptions of the Organizations operations. For more information about using this service, see the AWS Organizations User Guide. Support and feedback for AWS Organizations We welcome your feedback. Send your comments to [email protected] or post your feedback and questions in the AWS Organizations support forum. For more information about the AWS support forums, see Forums Help. Endpoint to call When using the AWS CLI or the AWS SDK For the current release of Organizations, specify the us-east-1 region for all AWS API and AWS CLI calls made from the commercial AWS Regions outside of China. If calling from one of the AWS Regions in China, then specify cn-northwest-1. You can do this in the AWS CLI by using these parameters and commands: Use the following parameter with each command to specify both the endpoint and its region: --endpoint-url https://organizations.us-east-1.amazonaws.com (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or --endpoint-url https://organizations.cn-northwest-1.amazonaws.com.cn (from AWS Regions in China) Use the default endpoint, but configure your default region with this command: aws configure set default.region us-east-1 (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or aws configure set default.region cn-northwest-1 (from AWS Regions in China) Use the following parameter with each command to specify the endpoint: --region us-east-1 (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or --region cn-northwest-1 (from AWS Regions in China) Recording API Requests AWS Organizations supports AWS CloudTrail, a service that records AWS API calls for your AWS account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. By using information collected by AWS CloudTrail, you can determine which requests the Organizations service received, who made the request and when, and so on. For more about AWS Organizations and its support for AWS CloudTrail, see Logging AWS Organizations Events with AWS CloudTrail in the AWS Organizations User Guide. To learn more about AWS CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the AWS CloudTrail User Guide.

AWS Application Discovery Service

AWS Application Discovery Service AWS Application Discovery Service helps you plan application migration projects. It automatically identifies servers, virtual machines (VMs), and network dependencies in your on-premises data centers. For more information, see the AWS Application Discovery Service FAQ. Application Discovery Service offers three ways of performing discovery and collecting data about your on-premises servers: Agentless discovery is recommended for environments that use VMware vCenter Server. This mode doesn't require you to install an agent on each host. It does not work in non-VMware environments. Agentless discovery gathers server information regardless of the operating systems, which minimizes the time required for initial on-premises infrastructure assessment. Agentless discovery doesn't collect information about network dependencies, only agent-based discovery collects that information. Agent-based discovery collects a richer set of data than agentless discovery by using the AWS Application Discovery Agent, which you install on one or more hosts in your data center. The agent captures infrastructure and application information, including an inventory of running processes, system performance information, resource utilization, and network dependencies. The information collected by agents is secured at rest and in transit to the Application Discovery Service database in the cloud. AWS Partner Network (APN) solutions integrate with Application Discovery Service, enabling you to import details of your on-premises environment directly into Migration Hub without using the discovery connector or discovery agent. Third-party application discovery tools can query AWS Application Discovery Service, and they can write to the Application Discovery Service database using the public API. In this way, you can import data into Migration Hub and view it, so that you can associate applications with servers and track migrations. Recommendations We recommend that you use agent-based discovery for non-VMware environments, and whenever you want to collect information about network dependencies. You can run agent-based and agentless discovery simultaneously. Use agentless discovery to complete the initial infrastructure assessment quickly, and then install agents on select hosts to collect additional information. Working With This Guide This API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for Application Discovery Service. The topic for each action shows the API request parameters and the response. Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that is tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. Remember that you must set your Migration Hub home region before you call any of these APIs. You must make API calls for write actions (create, notify, associate, disassociate, import, or put) while in your home region, or a HomeRegionNotSetException error is returned. API calls for read actions (list, describe, stop, and delete) are permitted outside of your home region. Although it is unlikely, the Migration Hub home region could change. If you call APIs outside the home region, an InvalidInputException is returned. You must call GetHomeRegion to obtain the latest Migration Hub home region. This guide is intended for use with the AWS Application Discovery Service User Guide. All data is handled according to the AWS Privacy Policy. You can operate Application Discovery Service offline to inspect collected data before it is shared with the service.

Amazon Interactive Video Service

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

Amazon Detective

Detective uses machine learning and purpose-built visualizations to help you analyze and investigate security issues across your Amazon Web Services (AWS) workloads. Detective automatically extracts time-based events such as login attempts, API calls, and network traffic from AWS CloudTrail and Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) flow logs. It also extracts findings detected by Amazon GuardDuty. The Detective API primarily supports the creation and management of behavior graphs. A behavior graph contains the extracted data from a set of member accounts, and is created and managed by an administrator account. Every behavior graph is specific to a Region. You can only use the API to manage graphs that belong to the Region that is associated with the currently selected endpoint. A Detective administrator account can use the Detective API to do the following: Enable and disable Detective. Enabling Detective creates a new behavior graph. View the list of member accounts in a behavior graph. Add member accounts to a behavior graph. Remove member accounts from a behavior graph. A member account can use the Detective API to do the following: View the list of behavior graphs that they are invited to. Accept an invitation to contribute to a behavior graph. Decline an invitation to contribute to a behavior graph. Remove their account from a behavior graph. All API actions are logged as CloudTrail events. See Logging Detective API Calls with CloudTrail. We replaced the term "master account" with the term "administrator account." An administrator account is used to centrally manage multiple accounts. In the case of Detective, the administrator account manages the accounts in their behavior graph.

Amazon Elastic Block Store

You can use the Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) direct APIs to create Amazon EBS snapshots, write data directly to your snapshots, read data on your snapshots, and identify the differences or changes between two snapshots. If you’re an independent software vendor (ISV) who offers backup services for Amazon EBS, the EBS direct APIs make it more efficient and cost-effective to track incremental changes on your Amazon EBS volumes through snapshots. This can be done without having to create new volumes from snapshots, and then use Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances to compare the differences. You can create incremental snapshots directly from data on-premises into volumes and the cloud to use for quick disaster recovery. With the ability to write and read snapshots, you can write your on-premises data to an snapshot during a disaster. Then after recovery, you can restore it back to Amazon Web Services or on-premises from the snapshot. You no longer need to build and maintain complex mechanisms to copy data to and from Amazon EBS. This API reference provides detailed information about the actions, data types, parameters, and errors of the EBS direct APIs. For more information about the elements that make up the EBS direct APIs, and examples of how to use them effectively, see Accessing the Contents of an Amazon EBS Snapshot in the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud User Guide. For more information about the supported Amazon Web Services Regions, endpoints, and service quotas for the EBS direct APIs, see Amazon Elastic Block Store Endpoints and Quotas in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

Amazon DynamoDB Streams

Amazon DynamoDB Amazon DynamoDB Streams provides API actions for accessing streams and processing stream records. To learn more about application development with Streams, see Capturing Table Activity with DynamoDB Streams in the Amazon DynamoDB Developer Guide.

Amazon EMR

Amazon EMR is a web service that makes it easier to process large amounts of data efficiently. Amazon EMR uses Hadoop processing combined with several Amazon Web Services services to do tasks such as web indexing, data mining, log file analysis, machine learning, scientific simulation, and data warehouse management.

AWS CodeStar Notifications

This AWS CodeStar Notifications API Reference provides descriptions and usage examples of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar Notifications API. You can use the AWS CodeStar Notifications API to work with the following objects: Notification rules, by calling the following: CreateNotificationRule, which creates a notification rule for a resource in your account. DeleteNotificationRule, which deletes a notification rule. DescribeNotificationRule, which provides information about a notification rule. ListNotificationRules, which lists the notification rules associated with your account. UpdateNotificationRule, which changes the name, events, or targets associated with a notification rule. Subscribe, which subscribes a target to a notification rule. Unsubscribe, which removes a target from a notification rule. Targets, by calling the following: DeleteTarget, which removes a notification rule target (SNS topic) from a notification rule. ListTargets, which lists the targets associated with a notification rule. Events, by calling the following: ListEventTypes, which lists the event types you can include in a notification rule. Tags, by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which lists the tags already associated with a notification rule in your account. TagResource, which associates a tag you provide with a notification rule in your account. UntagResource, which removes a tag from a notification rule in your account. For information about how to use AWS CodeStar Notifications, see link in the CodeStarNotifications User Guide.

Amazon DevOps Guru

Amazon DevOps Guru is a fully managed service that helps you identify anomalous behavior in business critical operational applications. You specify the AWS resources that you want DevOps Guru to cover, then the Amazon CloudWatch metrics and AWS CloudTrail events related to those resources are analyzed. When anomalous behavior is detected, DevOps Guru creates an insight that includes recommendations, related events, and related metrics that can help you improve your operational applications. For more information, see What is Amazon DevOps Guru. You can specify 1 or 2 Amazon Simple Notification Service topics so you are notified every time a new insight is created. You can also enable DevOps Guru to generate an OpsItem in AWS Systems Manager for each insight to help you manage and track your work addressing insights. To learn about the DevOps Guru workflow, see How DevOps Guru works. To learn about DevOps Guru concepts, see Concepts in DevOps Guru.

Amazon Machine Learning

Definition of the public APIs exposed by Amazon Machine Learning

Amazon Route 53 Resolver

When you create a VPC using Amazon VPC, you automatically get DNS resolution within the VPC from Route 53 Resolver. By default, Resolver answers DNS queries for VPC domain names such as domain names for EC2 instances or Elastic Load Balancing load balancers. Resolver performs recursive lookups against public name servers for all other domain names. You can also configure DNS resolution between your VPC and your network over a Direct Connect or VPN connection: Forward DNS queries from resolvers on your network to Route 53 Resolver DNS resolvers on your network can forward DNS queries to Resolver in a specified VPC. This allows your DNS resolvers to easily resolve domain names for Amazon Web Services resources such as EC2 instances or records in a Route 53 private hosted zone. For more information, see How DNS Resolvers on Your Network Forward DNS Queries to Route 53 Resolver in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. Conditionally forward queries from a VPC to resolvers on your network You can configure Resolver to forward queries that it receives from EC2 instances in your VPCs to DNS resolvers on your network. To forward selected queries, you create Resolver rules that specify the domain names for the DNS queries that you want to forward (such as example.com), and the IP addresses of the DNS resolvers on your network that you want to forward the queries to. If a query matches multiple rules (example.com, acme.example.com), Resolver chooses the rule with the most specific match (acme.example.com) and forwards the query to the IP addresses that you specified in that rule. For more information, see How Route 53 Resolver Forwards DNS Queries from Your VPCs to Your Network in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. Like Amazon VPC, Resolver is Regional. In each Region where you have VPCs, you can choose whether to forward queries from your VPCs to your network (outbound queries), from your network to your VPCs (inbound queries), or both.

Other APIs in the same category

Security Center

azure.com
API spec for Microsoft.Security (Azure Security Center) resource provider

AWS IoT 1-Click Devices Service

Describes all of the AWS IoT 1-Click device-related API operations for the service.
Also provides sample requests, responses, and errors for the supported web services
protocols.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on who is going to receive notifications associated with your Azure API Management deployment.

AWS Step Functions

AWS Step Functions AWS Step Functions is a service that lets you coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices using visual workflows. You can use Step Functions to build applications from individual components, each of which performs a discrete function, or task, allowing you to scale and change applications quickly. Step Functions provides a console that helps visualize the components of your application as a series of steps. Step Functions automatically triggers and tracks each step, and retries steps when there are errors, so your application executes predictably and in the right order every time. Step Functions logs the state of each step, so you can quickly diagnose and debug any issues. Step Functions manages operations and underlying infrastructure to ensure your application is available at any scale. You can run tasks on AWS, your own servers, or any system that has access to AWS. You can access and use Step Functions using the console, the AWS SDKs, or an HTTP API. For more information about Step Functions, see the AWS Step Functions Developer Guide .

AWS Application Discovery Service

AWS Application Discovery Service AWS Application Discovery Service helps you plan application migration projects. It automatically identifies servers, virtual machines (VMs), and network dependencies in your on-premises data centers. For more information, see the AWS Application Discovery Service FAQ. Application Discovery Service offers three ways of performing discovery and collecting data about your on-premises servers: Agentless discovery is recommended for environments that use VMware vCenter Server. This mode doesn't require you to install an agent on each host. It does not work in non-VMware environments. Agentless discovery gathers server information regardless of the operating systems, which minimizes the time required for initial on-premises infrastructure assessment. Agentless discovery doesn't collect information about network dependencies, only agent-based discovery collects that information. Agent-based discovery collects a richer set of data than agentless discovery by using the AWS Application Discovery Agent, which you install on one or more hosts in your data center. The agent captures infrastructure and application information, including an inventory of running processes, system performance information, resource utilization, and network dependencies. The information collected by agents is secured at rest and in transit to the Application Discovery Service database in the cloud. AWS Partner Network (APN) solutions integrate with Application Discovery Service, enabling you to import details of your on-premises environment directly into Migration Hub without using the discovery connector or discovery agent. Third-party application discovery tools can query AWS Application Discovery Service, and they can write to the Application Discovery Service database using the public API. In this way, you can import data into Migration Hub and view it, so that you can associate applications with servers and track migrations. Recommendations We recommend that you use agent-based discovery for non-VMware environments, and whenever you want to collect information about network dependencies. You can run agent-based and agentless discovery simultaneously. Use agentless discovery to complete the initial infrastructure assessment quickly, and then install agents on select hosts to collect additional information. Working With This Guide This API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for Application Discovery Service. The topic for each action shows the API request parameters and the response. Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that is tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. Remember that you must set your Migration Hub home region before you call any of these APIs. You must make API calls for write actions (create, notify, associate, disassociate, import, or put) while in your home region, or a HomeRegionNotSetException error is returned. API calls for read actions (list, describe, stop, and delete) are permitted outside of your home region. Although it is unlikely, the Migration Hub home region could change. If you call APIs outside the home region, an InvalidInputException is returned. You must call GetHomeRegion to obtain the latest Migration Hub home region. This guide is intended for use with the AWS Application Discovery Service User Guide. All data is handled according to the AWS Privacy Policy. You can operate Application Discovery Service offline to inspect collected data before it is shared with the service.

Amazon CodeGuru Reviewer

This section provides documentation for the Amazon CodeGuru Reviewer API operations. CodeGuru Reviewer is a service that uses program analysis and machine learning to detect potential defects that are difficult for developers to find and recommends fixes in your Java and Python code. By proactively detecting and providing recommendations for addressing code defects and implementing best practices, CodeGuru Reviewer improves the overall quality and maintainability of your code base during the code review stage. For more information about CodeGuru Reviewer, see the Amazon CodeGuru Reviewer User Guide. To improve the security of your CodeGuru Reviewer API calls, you can establish a private connection between your VPC and CodeGuru Reviewer by creating an interface VPC endpoint. For more information, see CodeGuru Reviewer and interface VPC endpoints (Amazon Web Services PrivateLink) in the Amazon CodeGuru Reviewer User Guide.

AWS MediaTailor

Use the AWS Elemental MediaTailor SDKs and CLI to configure scalable ad insertion and linear channels. With MediaTailor, you can assemble existing content into a linear stream and serve targeted ads to viewers while maintaining broadcast quality in over-the-top (OTT) video applications. For information about using the service, including detailed information about the settings covered in this guide, see the AWS Elemental MediaTailor User Guide. Through the SDKs and the CLI you manage AWS Elemental MediaTailor configurations and channels the same as you do through the console. For example, you specify ad insertion behavior and mapping information for the origin server and the ad decision server (ADS).

GalleryManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Gallery Management Client.

AutomationManagement

azure.com

AutomationManagement

azure.com

DeploymentAdminClient

azure.com
Deployment Admin Client.

CommerceManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Commerce Management Client.