Mock sample for your project: AWS Mobile API

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AWS Mobile

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-07-01


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "AWS Mobile API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

AWS Mobile Service provides mobile app and website developers with capabilities required to configure AWS resources and bootstrap their developer desktop projects with the necessary SDKs, constants, tools and samples to make use of those resources.

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If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. 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