Mock sample for your project: AWS Savings Plans API

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AWS Savings Plans

amazonaws.com

Version: 2019-06-28


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Description

Savings Plans are a pricing model that offer significant savings on AWS usage (for example, on Amazon EC2 instances). You commit to a consistent amount of usage, in USD per hour, for a term of 1 or 3 years, and receive a lower price for that usage. For more information, see the AWS Savings Plans User Guide.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Amazon Route 53 Resolver

When you create a VPC using Amazon VPC, you automatically get DNS resolution within the VPC from Route 53 Resolver. By default, Resolver answers DNS queries for VPC domain names such as domain names for EC2 instances or Elastic Load Balancing load balancers. Resolver performs recursive lookups against public name servers for all other domain names. You can also configure DNS resolution between your VPC and your network over a Direct Connect or VPN connection: Forward DNS queries from resolvers on your network to Route 53 Resolver DNS resolvers on your network can forward DNS queries to Resolver in a specified VPC. This allows your DNS resolvers to easily resolve domain names for Amazon Web Services resources such as EC2 instances or records in a Route 53 private hosted zone. For more information, see How DNS Resolvers on Your Network Forward DNS Queries to Route 53 Resolver in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. Conditionally forward queries from a VPC to resolvers on your network You can configure Resolver to forward queries that it receives from EC2 instances in your VPCs to DNS resolvers on your network. To forward selected queries, you create Resolver rules that specify the domain names for the DNS queries that you want to forward (such as example.com), and the IP addresses of the DNS resolvers on your network that you want to forward the queries to. If a query matches multiple rules (example.com, acme.example.com), Resolver chooses the rule with the most specific match (acme.example.com) and forwards the query to the IP addresses that you specified in that rule. For more information, see How Route 53 Resolver Forwards DNS Queries from Your VPCs to Your Network in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. Like Amazon VPC, Resolver is Regional. In each Region where you have VPCs, you can choose whether to forward queries from your VPCs to your network (outbound queries), from your network to your VPCs (inbound queries), or both.

AWS Import/Export

AWS Import/Export Service AWS Import/Export accelerates transferring large amounts of data between the AWS cloud and portable storage devices that you mail to us. AWS Import/Export transfers data directly onto and off of your storage devices using Amazon's high-speed internal network and bypassing the Internet. For large data sets, AWS Import/Export is often faster than Internet transfer and more cost effective than upgrading your connectivity.

Amazon DynamoDB

Amazon DynamoDB Amazon DynamoDB is a fully managed NoSQL database service that provides fast and predictable performance with seamless scalability. DynamoDB lets you offload the administrative burdens of operating and scaling a distributed database, so that you don't have to worry about hardware provisioning, setup and configuration, replication, software patching, or cluster scaling. With DynamoDB, you can create database tables that can store and retrieve any amount of data, and serve any level of request traffic. You can scale up or scale down your tables' throughput capacity without downtime or performance degradation, and use the AWS Management Console to monitor resource utilization and performance metrics. DynamoDB automatically spreads the data and traffic for your tables over a sufficient number of servers to handle your throughput and storage requirements, while maintaining consistent and fast performance. All of your data is stored on solid state disks (SSDs) and automatically replicated across multiple Availability Zones in an AWS region, providing built-in high availability and data durability.

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights is a service that helps you detect common problems with your applications. It enables you to pinpoint the source of issues in your applications (built with technologies such as Microsoft IIS, .NET, and Microsoft SQL Server), by providing key insights into detected problems. After you onboard your application, CloudWatch Application Insights identifies, recommends, and sets up metrics and logs. It continuously analyzes and correlates your metrics and logs for unusual behavior to surface actionable problems with your application. For example, if your application is slow and unresponsive and leading to HTTP 500 errors in your Application Load Balancer (ALB), Application Insights informs you that a memory pressure problem with your SQL Server database is occurring. It bases this analysis on impactful metrics and log errors.

Amazon Elastic Transcoder

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AWS Compute Optimizer

Compute Optimizer is a service that analyzes the configuration and utilization metrics of your Amazon Web Services compute resources, such as Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, Lambda functions, and Amazon EBS volumes. It reports whether your resources are optimal, and generates optimization recommendations to reduce the cost and improve the performance of your workloads. Compute Optimizer also provides recent utilization metric data, in addition to projected utilization metric data for the recommendations, which you can use to evaluate which recommendation provides the best price-performance trade-off. The analysis of your usage patterns can help you decide when to move or resize your running resources, and still meet your performance and capacity requirements. For more information about Compute Optimizer, including the required permissions to use the service, see the Compute Optimizer User Guide.

Amazon ElastiCache

Amazon ElastiCache Amazon ElastiCache is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a distributed cache in the cloud. With ElastiCache, customers get all of the benefits of a high-performance, in-memory cache with less of the administrative burden involved in launching and managing a distributed cache. The service makes setup, scaling, and cluster failure handling much simpler than in a self-managed cache deployment. In addition, through integration with Amazon CloudWatch, customers get enhanced visibility into the key performance statistics associated with their cache and can receive alarms if a part of their cache runs hot.

AWS CodeBuild

CodeBuild CodeBuild is a fully managed build service in the cloud. CodeBuild compiles your source code, runs unit tests, and produces artifacts that are ready to deploy. CodeBuild eliminates the need to provision, manage, and scale your own build servers. It provides prepackaged build environments for the most popular programming languages and build tools, such as Apache Maven, Gradle, and more. You can also fully customize build environments in CodeBuild to use your own build tools. CodeBuild scales automatically to meet peak build requests. You pay only for the build time you consume. For more information about CodeBuild, see the CodeBuild User Guide.

Route53 Recovery Cluster

Welcome to the Amazon Route 53 Application Recovery Controller API Reference Guide for Recovery Control Data Plane . Recovery control in Route 53 Application Recovery Controller includes extremely reliable routing controls that enable you to recover applications by rerouting traffic, for example, across Availability Zones or AWS Regions. Routing controls are simple on/off switches hosted on a cluster. A cluster is a set of five redundant regional endpoints against which you can execute API calls to update or get the state of routing controls. You use routing controls to failover traffic to recover your application across Availability Zones or Regions. This API guide includes information about how to get and update routing control states in Route 53 Application Recovery Controller. For more information about Route 53 Application Recovery Controller, see the following: You can create clusters, routing controls, and control panels by using the control plane API for Recovery Control. For more information, see Amazon Route 53 Application Recovery Controller Recovery Control API Reference. Route 53 Application Recovery Controller also provides continuous readiness checks to ensure that your applications are scaled to handle failover traffic. For more information about the related API actions, see Amazon Route 53 Application Recovery Controller Recovery Readiness API Reference. For more information about creating resilient applications and preparing for recovery readiness with Route 53 Application Recovery Controller, see the Amazon Route 53 Application Recovery Controller Developer Guide.

AWS IoT Jobs Data Plane

AWS IoT Jobs is a service that allows you to define a set of jobs β€” remote operations that are sent to and executed on one or more devices connected to AWS IoT. For example, you can define a job that instructs a set of devices to download and install application or firmware updates, reboot, rotate certificates, or perform remote troubleshooting operations. To create a job, you make a job document which is a description of the remote operations to be performed, and you specify a list of targets that should perform the operations. The targets can be individual things, thing groups or both. AWS IoT Jobs sends a message to inform the targets that a job is available. The target starts the execution of the job by downloading the job document, performing the operations it specifies, and reporting its progress to AWS IoT. The Jobs service provides commands to track the progress of a job on a specific target and for all the targets of the job

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to run Kubernetes on Amazon Web Services without needing to stand up or maintain your own Kubernetes control plane. Kubernetes is an open-source system for automating the deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Amazon EKS runs up-to-date versions of the open-source Kubernetes software, so you can use all the existing plugins and tooling from the Kubernetes community. Applications running on Amazon EKS are fully compatible with applications running on any standard Kubernetes environment, whether running in on-premises data centers or public clouds. This means that you can easily migrate any standard Kubernetes application to Amazon EKS without any code modification required.

Amazon QLDB Session

The transactional data APIs for Amazon QLDB Instead of interacting directly with this API, we recommend using the QLDB driver or the QLDB shell to execute data transactions on a ledger. If you are working with an AWS SDK, use the QLDB driver. The driver provides a high-level abstraction layer above this QLDB Session data plane and manages SendCommand API calls for you. For information and a list of supported programming languages, see Getting started with the driver in the Amazon QLDB Developer Guide. If you are working with the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), use the QLDB shell. The shell is a command line interface that uses the QLDB driver to interact with a ledger. For information, see Accessing Amazon QLDB using the QLDB shell.

Other APIs in the same category

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

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AWS DataSync

DataSync DataSync is a managed data transfer service that makes it simpler for you to automate moving data between on-premises storage and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) or Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS). This API interface reference for DataSync contains documentation for a programming interface that you can use to manage DataSync.

AWSKendraFrontendService

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EC2 Image Builder

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Amazon Kinesis

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AWS License Manager

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AWS Elastic Beanstalk

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AWS MediaConnect

API for AWS Elemental MediaConnect

Amazon DynamoDB

Amazon DynamoDB Amazon DynamoDB is a fully managed NoSQL database service that provides fast and predictable performance with seamless scalability. DynamoDB lets you offload the administrative burdens of operating and scaling a distributed database, so that you don't have to worry about hardware provisioning, setup and configuration, replication, software patching, or cluster scaling. With DynamoDB, you can create database tables that can store and retrieve any amount of data, and serve any level of request traffic. You can scale up or scale down your tables' throughput capacity without downtime or performance degradation, and use the AWS Management Console to monitor resource utilization and performance metrics. DynamoDB automatically spreads the data and traffic for your tables over a sufficient number of servers to handle your throughput and storage requirements, while maintaining consistent and fast performance. All of your data is stored on solid state disks (SSDs) and automatically replicated across multiple Availability Zones in an AWS region, providing built-in high availability and data durability.
Glue Defines the public endpoint for the Glue service.

AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.