Mock sample for your project: Amazon EMR Containers API

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Amazon EMR Containers

amazonaws.com

Version: 2020-10-01


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Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "Amazon EMR Containers API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

Amazon EMR on EKS provides a deployment option for Amazon EMR that allows you to run open-source big data frameworks on Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS). With this deployment option, you can focus on running analytics workloads while Amazon EMR on EKS builds, configures, and manages containers for open-source applications. For more information about Amazon EMR on EKS concepts and tasks, see What is Amazon EMR on EKS. Amazon EMR containers is the API name for Amazon EMR on EKS. The emr-containers prefix is used in the following scenarios: It is the prefix in the CLI commands for Amazon EMR on EKS. For example, aws emr-containers start-job-run. It is the prefix before IAM policy actions for Amazon EMR on EKS. For example,"Action": [ "emr-containers:StartJobRun"]. For more information, see Policy actions for Amazon EMR on EKS. It is the prefix used in Amazon EMR on EKS service endpoints. For example, emr-containers.us-east-2.amazonaws.com. For more information, see Amazon EMR on EKS Service Endpoints.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Outposts

AWS Outposts is a fully managed service that extends AWS infrastructure, APIs, and tools to customer premises. By providing local access to AWS managed infrastructure, AWS Outposts enables customers to build and run applications on premises using the same programming interfaces as in AWS Regions, while using local compute and storage resources for lower latency and local data processing needs.

FinSpace User Environment Management service

The FinSpace management service provides the APIs for managing the FinSpace environments.

AWS Health APIs and Notifications

AWS Health The AWS Health API provides programmatic access to the AWS Health information that appears in the AWS Personal Health Dashboard. You can use the API operations to get information about AWS Health events that affect your AWS services and resources. You must have a Business or Enterprise Support plan from AWS Support to use the AWS Health API. If you call the AWS Health API from an AWS account that doesn't have a Business or Enterprise Support plan, you receive a SubscriptionRequiredException error. You can use the AWS Health endpoint health.us-east-1.amazonaws.com (HTTPS) to call the AWS Health API operations. AWS Health supports a multi-Region application architecture and has two regional endpoints in an active-passive configuration. You can use the high availability endpoint example to determine which AWS Region is active, so that you can get the latest information from the API. For more information, see Accessing the AWS Health API in the AWS Health User Guide. For authentication of requests, AWS Health uses the Signature Version 4 Signing Process. If your AWS account is part of AWS Organizations, you can use the AWS Health organizational view feature. This feature provides a centralized view of AWS Health events across all accounts in your organization. You can aggregate AWS Health events in real time to identify accounts in your organization that are affected by an operational event or get notified of security vulnerabilities. Use the organizational view API operations to enable this feature and return event information. For more information, see Aggregating AWS Health events in the AWS Health User Guide. When you use the AWS Health API operations to return AWS Health events, see the following recommendations: Use the eventScopeCode parameter to specify whether to return AWS Health events that are public or account-specific. Use pagination to view all events from the response. For example, if you call the DescribeEventsForOrganization operation to get all events in your organization, you might receive several page results. Specify the nextToken in the next request to return more results.

Elastic Load Balancing

Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer distributes incoming traffic across targets, such as your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered targets and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy targets. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer. You configure a target group with a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the targets, and with health check settings to be used when checking the health status of the targets. Elastic Load Balancing supports the following types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, Gateway Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. This reference covers the following load balancer types: Application Load Balancer - Operates at the application layer (layer 7) and supports HTTP and HTTPS. Network Load Balancer - Operates at the transport layer (layer 4) and supports TCP, TLS, and UDP. Gateway Load Balancer - Operates at the network layer (layer 3). For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds.

AWS CodeDeploy

AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy is a deployment service that automates application deployments to Amazon EC2 instances, on-premises instances running in your own facility, serverless AWS Lambda functions, or applications in an Amazon ECS service. You can deploy a nearly unlimited variety of application content, such as an updated Lambda function, updated applications in an Amazon ECS service, code, web and configuration files, executables, packages, scripts, multimedia files, and so on. AWS CodeDeploy can deploy application content stored in Amazon S3 buckets, GitHub repositories, or Bitbucket repositories. You do not need to make changes to your existing code before you can use AWS CodeDeploy. AWS CodeDeploy makes it easier for you to rapidly release new features, helps you avoid downtime during application deployment, and handles the complexity of updating your applications, without many of the risks associated with error-prone manual deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Components Use the information in this guide to help you work with the following AWS CodeDeploy components: Application : A name that uniquely identifies the application you want to deploy. AWS CodeDeploy uses this name, which functions as a container, to ensure the correct combination of revision, deployment configuration, and deployment group are referenced during a deployment. Deployment group : A set of individual instances, CodeDeploy Lambda deployment configuration settings, or an Amazon ECS service and network details. A Lambda deployment group specifies how to route traffic to a new version of a Lambda function. An Amazon ECS deployment group specifies the service created in Amazon ECS to deploy, a load balancer, and a listener to reroute production traffic to an updated containerized application. An EC2/On-premises deployment group contains individually tagged instances, Amazon EC2 instances in Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, or both. All deployment groups can specify optional trigger, alarm, and rollback settings. Deployment configuration : A set of deployment rules and deployment success and failure conditions used by AWS CodeDeploy during a deployment. Deployment : The process and the components used when updating a Lambda function, a containerized application in an Amazon ECS service, or of installing content on one or more instances. Application revisions : For an AWS Lambda deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Lambda function to be updated and one or more functions to validate deployment lifecycle events. For an Amazon ECS deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Amazon ECS task definition, container, and port where production traffic is rerouted. For an EC2/On-premises deployment, this is an archive file that contains source content—source code, webpages, executable files, and deployment scripts—along with an AppSpec file. Revisions are stored in Amazon S3 buckets or GitHub repositories. For Amazon S3, a revision is uniquely identified by its Amazon S3 object key and its ETag, version, or both. For GitHub, a revision is uniquely identified by its commit ID. This guide also contains information to help you get details about the instances in your deployments, to make on-premises instances available for AWS CodeDeploy deployments, to get details about a Lambda function deployment, and to get details about Amazon ECS service deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Information Resources AWS CodeDeploy User Guide AWS CodeDeploy API Reference Guide AWS CLI Reference for AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy Developer Forum

AWS IoT 1-Click Devices Service

Describes all of the AWS IoT 1-Click device-related API operations for the service.
Also provides sample requests, responses, and errors for the supported web services
protocols.

Auto Scaling

Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling is designed to automatically launch or terminate EC2 instances based on user-defined scaling policies, scheduled actions, and health checks. For more information about Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling, see the Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling User Guide. For information about granting IAM users required permissions for calls to Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling, see Granting IAM users required permissions for Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling resources in the Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling API Reference.

AWS SecurityHub

Security Hub provides you with a comprehensive view of the security state of your Amazon Web Services environment and resources. It also provides you with the readiness status of your environment based on controls from supported security standards. Security Hub collects security data from Amazon Web Services accounts, services, and integrated third-party products and helps you analyze security trends in your environment to identify the highest priority security issues. For more information about Security Hub, see the Security Hub User Guide . When you use operations in the Security Hub API, the requests are executed only in the Amazon Web Services Region that is currently active or in the specific Amazon Web Services Region that you specify in your request. Any configuration or settings change that results from the operation is applied only to that Region. To make the same change in other Regions, execute the same command for each Region to apply the change to. For example, if your Region is set to us-west-2, when you use CreateMembers to add a member account to Security Hub, the association of the member account with the administrator account is created only in the us-west-2 Region. Security Hub must be enabled for the member account in the same Region that the invitation was sent from. The following throttling limits apply to using Security Hub API operations. BatchEnableStandards - RateLimit of 1 request per second, BurstLimit of 1 request per second. GetFindings - RateLimit of 3 requests per second. BurstLimit of 6 requests per second. UpdateFindings - RateLimit of 1 request per second. BurstLimit of 5 requests per second. UpdateStandardsControl - RateLimit of 1 request per second, BurstLimit of 5 requests per second. All other operations - RateLimit of 10 requests per second. BurstLimit of 30 requests per second.

AWSServerlessApplicationRepository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository makes it easy for developers and enterprises to quickly find
and deploy serverless applications in the AWS Cloud. For more information about serverless applications,
see Serverless Computing and Applications on the AWS website. The AWS Serverless Application Repository is deeply integrated with the AWS Lambda console, so that developers of
all levels can get started with serverless computing without needing to learn anything new. You can use category
keywords to browse for applications such as web and mobile backends, data processing applications, or chatbots.
You can also search for applications by name, publisher, or event source. To use an application, you simply choose it,
configure any required fields, and deploy it with a few clicks. You can also easily publish applications, sharing them publicly with the community at large, or privately
within your team or across your organization. To publish a serverless application (or app), you can use the
AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or AWS SDKs to upload the code. Along with the
code, you upload a simple manifest file, also known as the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) template.
For more information about AWS SAM, see AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) on the AWS Labs
GitHub repository. The AWS Serverless Application Repository Developer Guide contains more information about the two developer
experiences available:
Consuming Applications – Browse for applications and view information about them, including
source code and readme files. Also install, configure, and deploy applications of your choosing.
Publishing Applications – Configure and upload applications to make them available to other
developers, and publish new versions of applications.

AWSKendraFrontendService

Amazon Kendra is a service for indexing large document sets.
The Amazon Braket API Reference provides information about the operations and structures supported in Amazon Braket.

AWS Signer

AWS Signer is a fully managed code signing service to help you ensure the trust and integrity of your code. AWS Signer supports the following applications: With code signing for AWS Lambda, you can sign AWS Lambda deployment packages. Integrated support is provided for Amazon S3, Amazon CloudWatch, and AWS CloudTrail. In order to sign code, you create a signing profile and then use Signer to sign Lambda zip files in S3. With code signing for IoT, you can sign code for any IoT device that is supported by AWS. IoT code signing is available for Amazon FreeRTOS and AWS IoT Device Management, and is integrated with AWS Certificate Manager (ACM). In order to sign code, you import a third-party code signing certificate using ACM, and use that to sign updates in Amazon FreeRTOS and AWS IoT Device Management. For more information about AWS Signer, see the AWS Signer Developer Guide.

Other APIs in the same category

AutomationManagement

azure.com

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

AWS Certificate Manager

Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager You can use Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager (ACM) to manage SSL/TLS certificates for your Amazon Web Services-based websites and applications. For more information about using ACM, see the Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager User Guide.

AWS Comprehend Medical

Amazon Comprehend Medical extracts structured information from unstructured clinical text. Use these actions to gain insight in your documents.

AmazonApiGatewayManagementApi

The Amazon API Gateway Management API allows you to directly manage runtime aspects of your deployed APIs. To use it, you must explicitly set the SDK's endpoint to point to the endpoint of your deployed API. The endpoint will be of the form https://{api-id}.execute-api.{region}.amazonaws.com/{stage}, or will be the endpoint corresponding to your API's custom domain and base path, if applicable.

Auto Scaling

Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling is designed to automatically launch or terminate EC2 instances based on user-defined scaling policies, scheduled actions, and health checks. For more information about Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling, see the Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling User Guide. For information about granting IAM users required permissions for calls to Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling, see Granting IAM users required permissions for Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling resources in the Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling API Reference.

Application Auto Scaling

With Application Auto Scaling, you can configure automatic scaling for the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 fleets Amazon Aurora Replicas Amazon Comprehend document classification and entity recognizer endpoints Amazon DynamoDB tables and global secondary indexes throughput capacity Amazon ECS services Amazon ElastiCache for Redis clusters (replication groups) Amazon EMR clusters Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra) tables Lambda function provisioned concurrency Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka broker storage Amazon SageMaker endpoint variants Spot Fleet (Amazon EC2) requests Custom resources provided by your own applications or services API Summary The Application Auto Scaling service API includes three key sets of actions: Register and manage scalable targets - Register Amazon Web Services or custom resources as scalable targets (a resource that Application Auto Scaling can scale), set minimum and maximum capacity limits, and retrieve information on existing scalable targets. Configure and manage automatic scaling - Define scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources in response to CloudWatch alarms, schedule one-time or recurring scaling actions, and retrieve your recent scaling activity history. Suspend and resume scaling - Temporarily suspend and later resume automatic scaling by calling the RegisterScalableTarget API action for any Application Auto Scaling scalable target. You can suspend and resume (individually or in combination) scale-out activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, scale-in activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, and scheduled scaling. To learn more about Application Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for Application Auto Scaling actions, see the Application Auto Scaling User Guide.

AWS Cloud9

Cloud9 Cloud9 is a collection of tools that you can use to code, build, run, test, debug, and release software in the cloud. For more information about Cloud9, see the Cloud9 User Guide. Cloud9 supports these operations: CreateEnvironmentEC2 : Creates an Cloud9 development environment, launches an Amazon EC2 instance, and then connects from the instance to the environment. CreateEnvironmentMembership : Adds an environment member to an environment. DeleteEnvironment : Deletes an environment. If an Amazon EC2 instance is connected to the environment, also terminates the instance. DeleteEnvironmentMembership : Deletes an environment member from an environment. DescribeEnvironmentMemberships : Gets information about environment members for an environment. DescribeEnvironments : Gets information about environments. DescribeEnvironmentStatus : Gets status information for an environment. ListEnvironments : Gets a list of environment identifiers. ListTagsForResource : Gets the tags for an environment. TagResource : Adds tags to an environment. UntagResource : Removes tags from an environment. UpdateEnvironment : Changes the settings of an existing environment. UpdateEnvironmentMembership : Changes the settings of an existing environment member for an environment.

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights is a service that helps you detect common problems with your applications. It enables you to pinpoint the source of issues in your applications (built with technologies such as Microsoft IIS, .NET, and Microsoft SQL Server), by providing key insights into detected problems. After you onboard your application, CloudWatch Application Insights identifies, recommends, and sets up metrics and logs. It continuously analyzes and correlates your metrics and logs for unusual behavior to surface actionable problems with your application. For example, if your application is slow and unresponsive and leading to HTTP 500 errors in your Application Load Balancer (ALB), Application Insights informs you that a memory pressure problem with your SQL Server database is occurring. It bases this analysis on impactful metrics and log errors.

AWS Compute Optimizer

Compute Optimizer is a service that analyzes the configuration and utilization metrics of your Amazon Web Services compute resources, such as Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, Lambda functions, and Amazon EBS volumes. It reports whether your resources are optimal, and generates optimization recommendations to reduce the cost and improve the performance of your workloads. Compute Optimizer also provides recent utilization metric data, in addition to projected utilization metric data for the recommendations, which you can use to evaluate which recommendation provides the best price-performance trade-off. The analysis of your usage patterns can help you decide when to move or resize your running resources, and still meet your performance and capacity requirements. For more information about Compute Optimizer, including the required permissions to use the service, see the Compute Optimizer User Guide.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on Subscription entity associated with your Azure API Management deployment. The Subscription entity represents the association between a user and a product in API Management. Products contain one or more APIs, and once a product is published, developers can subscribe to the product and begin to use the product’s APIs.