Mock sample for your project: AWS CodeStar Notifications API

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AWS CodeStar Notifications

amazonaws.com

Version: 2019-10-15


Use this API in your project

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It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

This AWS CodeStar Notifications API Reference provides descriptions and usage examples of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar Notifications API. You can use the AWS CodeStar Notifications API to work with the following objects: Notification rules, by calling the following: CreateNotificationRule, which creates a notification rule for a resource in your account. DeleteNotificationRule, which deletes a notification rule. DescribeNotificationRule, which provides information about a notification rule. ListNotificationRules, which lists the notification rules associated with your account. UpdateNotificationRule, which changes the name, events, or targets associated with a notification rule. Subscribe, which subscribes a target to a notification rule. Unsubscribe, which removes a target from a notification rule. Targets, by calling the following: DeleteTarget, which removes a notification rule target (SNS topic) from a notification rule. ListTargets, which lists the targets associated with a notification rule. Events, by calling the following: ListEventTypes, which lists the event types you can include in a notification rule. Tags, by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which lists the tags already associated with a notification rule in your account. TagResource, which associates a tag you provide with a notification rule in your account. UntagResource, which removes a tag from a notification rule in your account. For information about how to use AWS CodeStar Notifications, see link in the CodeStarNotifications User Guide.

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