Mock sample for your project: Amazon Simple Systems Manager (SSM) API

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Amazon Simple Systems Manager (SSM)

amazonaws.com

Version: 2014-11-06


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Description

Amazon Web Services Systems Manager is a collection of capabilities that helps you automate management tasks such as collecting system inventory, applying operating system (OS) patches, automating the creation of Amazon Machine Images (AMIs), and configuring operating systems (OSs) and applications at scale. Systems Manager lets you remotely and securely manage the configuration of your managed instances. A managed instance is any Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud instance (EC2 instance), or any on-premises server or virtual machine (VM) in your hybrid environment that has been configured for Systems Manager. This reference is intended to be used with the Amazon Web Services Systems Manager User Guide. To get started, verify prerequisites and configure managed instances. For more information, see Setting up Amazon Web Services Systems Manager in the Amazon Web Services Systems Manager User Guide. Related resources For information about how to use a Query API, see Making API requests. For information about other API operations you can perform on EC2 instances, see the Amazon EC2 API Reference. For information about AppConfig, a capability of Systems Manager, see the AppConfig User Guide and the AppConfig API Reference. For information about Incident Manager, a capability of Systems Manager, see the Incident Manager User Guide and the Incident Manager API Reference.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWSServerlessApplicationRepository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository makes it easy for developers and enterprises to quickly find
and deploy serverless applications in the AWS Cloud. For more information about serverless applications,
see Serverless Computing and Applications on the AWS website. The AWS Serverless Application Repository is deeply integrated with the AWS Lambda console, so that developers of
all levels can get started with serverless computing without needing to learn anything new. You can use category
keywords to browse for applications such as web and mobile backends, data processing applications, or chatbots.
You can also search for applications by name, publisher, or event source. To use an application, you simply choose it,
configure any required fields, and deploy it with a few clicks. You can also easily publish applications, sharing them publicly with the community at large, or privately
within your team or across your organization. To publish a serverless application (or app), you can use the
AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or AWS SDKs to upload the code. Along with the
code, you upload a simple manifest file, also known as the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) template.
For more information about AWS SAM, see AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) on the AWS Labs
GitHub repository. The AWS Serverless Application Repository Developer Guide contains more information about the two developer
experiences available:
Consuming Applications – Browse for applications and view information about them, including
source code and readme files. Also install, configure, and deploy applications of your choosing.
Publishing Applications – Configure and upload applications to make them available to other
developers, and publish new versions of applications.

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Amazon Personalize

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Amazon CloudWatch

Amazon CloudWatch monitors your Amazon Web Services (Amazon Web Services) resources and the applications you run on Amazon Web Services in real time. You can use CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, which are the variables you want to measure for your resources and applications. CloudWatch alarms send notifications or automatically change the resources you are monitoring based on rules that you define. For example, you can monitor the CPU usage and disk reads and writes of your Amazon EC2 instances. Then, use this data to determine whether you should launch additional instances to handle increased load. You can also use this data to stop under-used instances to save money. In addition to monitoring the built-in metrics that come with Amazon Web Services, you can monitor your own custom metrics. With CloudWatch, you gain system-wide visibility into resource utilization, application performance, and operational health.

AWS Marketplace Commerce Analytics

Provides AWS Marketplace business intelligence data on-demand.

AWS Organizations

AWS Organizations is a web service that enables you to consolidate your multiple AWS accounts into an organization and centrally manage your accounts and their resources. This guide provides descriptions of the Organizations operations. For more information about using this service, see the AWS Organizations User Guide. Support and feedback for AWS Organizations We welcome your feedback. Send your comments to [email protected] or post your feedback and questions in the AWS Organizations support forum. For more information about the AWS support forums, see Forums Help. Endpoint to call When using the AWS CLI or the AWS SDK For the current release of Organizations, specify the us-east-1 region for all AWS API and AWS CLI calls made from the commercial AWS Regions outside of China. If calling from one of the AWS Regions in China, then specify cn-northwest-1. You can do this in the AWS CLI by using these parameters and commands: Use the following parameter with each command to specify both the endpoint and its region: --endpoint-url https://organizations.us-east-1.amazonaws.com (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or --endpoint-url https://organizations.cn-northwest-1.amazonaws.com.cn (from AWS Regions in China) Use the default endpoint, but configure your default region with this command: aws configure set default.region us-east-1 (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or aws configure set default.region cn-northwest-1 (from AWS Regions in China) Use the following parameter with each command to specify the endpoint: --region us-east-1 (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or --region cn-northwest-1 (from AWS Regions in China) Recording API Requests AWS Organizations supports AWS CloudTrail, a service that records AWS API calls for your AWS account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. By using information collected by AWS CloudTrail, you can determine which requests the Organizations service received, who made the request and when, and so on. For more about AWS Organizations and its support for AWS CloudTrail, see Logging AWS Organizations Events with AWS CloudTrail in the AWS Organizations User Guide. To learn more about AWS CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the AWS CloudTrail User Guide.

AWS Lake Formation

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Amazon Lex Model Building Service

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Amazon Import/Export Snowball

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Amazon Simple Email Service

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Amazon Personalize Events

Amazon Personalize can consume real-time user event data, such as stream or click data, and use it for model training either alone or combined with historical data. For more information see Recording Events.

Other APIs in the same category

AWS Amplify

Amplify enables developers to develop and deploy cloud-powered mobile and web apps. The Amplify Console provides a continuous delivery and hosting service for web applications. For more information, see the Amplify Console User Guide. The Amplify Framework is a comprehensive set of SDKs, libraries, tools, and documentation for client app development. For more information, see the Amplify Framework.

Diagnostics API Client

azure.com

AWS IoT SiteWise

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Amazon Connect Customer Profiles

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles Welcome to the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API Reference. This guide provides information about the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API, including supported operations, data types, parameters, and schemas. Amazon Connect Customer Profiles is a unified customer profile for your contact center that has pre-built connectors powered by AppFlow that make it easy to combine customer information from third party applications, such as Salesforce (CRM), ServiceNow (ITSM), and your enterprise resource planning (ERP), with contact history from your Amazon Connect contact center. If you're new to Amazon Connect , you might find it helpful to also review the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide.

Amazon CloudWatch

Amazon CloudWatch monitors your Amazon Web Services (Amazon Web Services) resources and the applications you run on Amazon Web Services in real time. You can use CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, which are the variables you want to measure for your resources and applications. CloudWatch alarms send notifications or automatically change the resources you are monitoring based on rules that you define. For example, you can monitor the CPU usage and disk reads and writes of your Amazon EC2 instances. Then, use this data to determine whether you should launch additional instances to handle increased load. You can also use this data to stop under-used instances to save money. In addition to monitoring the built-in metrics that come with Amazon Web Services, you can monitor your own custom metrics. With CloudWatch, you gain system-wide visibility into resource utilization, application performance, and operational health.

AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

AWS DataSync

DataSync DataSync is a managed data transfer service that makes it simpler for you to automate moving data between on-premises storage and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) or Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS). This API interface reference for DataSync contains documentation for a programming interface that you can use to manage DataSync.

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

Amazon Appflow

Welcome to the Amazon AppFlow API reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Amazon AppFlow API operations, data types, and errors. Amazon AppFlow is a fully managed integration service that enables you to securely transfer data between software as a service (SaaS) applications like Salesforce, Marketo, Slack, and ServiceNow, and Amazon Web Services like Amazon S3 and Amazon Redshift. Use the following links to get started on the Amazon AppFlow API: Actions : An alphabetical list of all Amazon AppFlow API operations. Data types : An alphabetical list of all Amazon AppFlow data types. Common parameters : Parameters that all Query operations can use. Common errors : Client and server errors that all operations can return. If you're new to Amazon AppFlow, we recommend that you review the Amazon AppFlow User Guide. Amazon AppFlow API users can use vendor-specific mechanisms for OAuth, and include applicable OAuth attributes (such as auth-code and redirecturi) with the connector-specific ConnectorProfileProperties when creating a new connector profile using Amazon AppFlow API operations. For example, Salesforce users can refer to the Authorize Apps with OAuth documentation.

Amazon Kinesis

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ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on OpenId Connect Provider entity associated with your Azure API Management deployment. API Management allows you to access APIs secured with token from OpenID Connect Provider to be accessed from the Developer Console.

Amazon Connect Service

Amazon Connect is a cloud-based contact center solution that you use to set up and manage a customer contact center and provide reliable customer engagement at any scale. Amazon Connect provides metrics and real-time reporting that enable you to optimize contact routing. You can also resolve customer issues more efficiently by getting customers in touch with the appropriate agents. There are limits to the number of Amazon Connect resources that you can create. There are also limits to the number of requests that you can make per second. For more information, see Amazon Connect Service Quotas in the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide. You can connect programmatically to an AWS service by using an endpoint. For a list of Amazon Connect endpoints, see Amazon Connect Endpoints. Working with contact flows? Check out the Amazon Connect Flow language.