Mock sample for your project: EC2 Image Builder API

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EC2 Image Builder

amazonaws.com

Version: 2019-12-02


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "EC2 Image Builder API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

EC2 Image Builder is a fully managed Amazon Web Services service that makes it easier to automate the creation, management, and deployment of customized, secure, and up-to-date "golden" server images that are pre-installed and pre-configured with software and settings to meet specific IT standards.

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AWS Key Management Service

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