Mock sample for your project: Amazon Elasticsearch Service API

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Amazon Elasticsearch Service

amazonaws.com

Version: 2015-01-01


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Description

Amazon Elasticsearch Configuration Service Use the Amazon Elasticsearch Configuration API to create, configure, and manage Elasticsearch domains. For sample code that uses the Configuration API, see the Amazon Elasticsearch Service Developer Guide. The guide also contains sample code for sending signed HTTP requests to the Elasticsearch APIs. The endpoint for configuration service requests is region-specific: es. region.amazonaws.com. For example, es.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. For a current list of supported regions and endpoints, see Regions and Endpoints.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

Amazon CloudFront

Amazon CloudFront This is the Amazon CloudFront API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about CloudFront API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about CloudFront features, see the Amazon CloudFront Developer Guide.

AWS CloudTrail

CloudTrail This is the CloudTrail API Reference. It provides descriptions of actions, data types, common parameters, and common errors for CloudTrail. CloudTrail is a web service that records Amazon Web Services API calls for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. The recorded information includes the identity of the user, the start time of the Amazon Web Services API call, the source IP address, the request parameters, and the response elements returned by the service. As an alternative to the API, you can use one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs, which consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .NET, iOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide programmatic access to CloudTrail. For example, the SDKs handle cryptographically signing requests, managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools to Build on Amazon Web Services. See the CloudTrail User Guide for information about the data that is included with each Amazon Web Services API call listed in the log files.

AWS Performance Insights

Amazon RDS Performance Insights Amazon RDS Performance Insights enables you to monitor and explore different dimensions of database load based on data captured from a running DB instance. The guide provides detailed information about Performance Insights data types, parameters and errors. When Performance Insights is enabled, the Amazon RDS Performance Insights API provides visibility into the performance of your DB instance. Amazon CloudWatch provides the authoritative source for AWS service-vended monitoring metrics. Performance Insights offers a domain-specific view of DB load. DB load is measured as Average Active Sessions. Performance Insights provides the data to API consumers as a two-dimensional time-series dataset. The time dimension provides DB load data for each time point in the queried time range. Each time point decomposes overall load in relation to the requested dimensions, measured at that time point. Examples include SQL, Wait event, User, and Host. To learn more about Performance Insights and Amazon Aurora DB instances, go to the Amazon Aurora User Guide. To learn more about Performance Insights and Amazon RDS DB instances, go to the Amazon RDS User Guide.

AWS Data Pipeline

AWS Data Pipeline configures and manages a data-driven workflow called a pipeline. AWS Data Pipeline handles the details of scheduling and ensuring that data dependencies are met so that your application can focus on processing the data. AWS Data Pipeline provides a JAR implementation of a task runner called AWS Data Pipeline Task Runner. AWS Data Pipeline Task Runner provides logic for common data management scenarios, such as performing database queries and running data analysis using Amazon Elastic MapReduce (Amazon EMR). You can use AWS Data Pipeline Task Runner as your task runner, or you can write your own task runner to provide custom data management. AWS Data Pipeline implements two main sets of functionality. Use the first set to create a pipeline and define data sources, schedules, dependencies, and the transforms to be performed on the data. Use the second set in your task runner application to receive the next task ready for processing. The logic for performing the task, such as querying the data, running data analysis, or converting the data from one format to another, is contained within the task runner. The task runner performs the task assigned to it by the web service, reporting progress to the web service as it does so. When the task is done, the task runner reports the final success or failure of the task to the web service.

AWS CodeStar

AWS CodeStar This is the API reference for AWS CodeStar. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeStar API to work with: Projects and their resources, by calling the following: DeleteProject, which deletes a project. DescribeProject, which lists the attributes of a project. ListProjects, which lists all projects associated with your AWS account. ListResources, which lists the resources associated with a project. ListTagsForProject, which lists the tags associated with a project. TagProject, which adds tags to a project. UntagProject, which removes tags from a project. UpdateProject, which updates the attributes of a project. Teams and team members, by calling the following: AssociateTeamMember, which adds an IAM user to the team for a project. DisassociateTeamMember, which removes an IAM user from the team for a project. ListTeamMembers, which lists all the IAM users in the team for a project, including their roles and attributes. UpdateTeamMember, which updates a team member's attributes in a project. Users, by calling the following: CreateUserProfile, which creates a user profile that contains data associated with the user across all projects. DeleteUserProfile, which deletes all user profile information across all projects. DescribeUserProfile, which describes the profile of a user. ListUserProfiles, which lists all user profiles. UpdateUserProfile, which updates the profile for a user.

AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority

This is the ACM Private CA API Reference. It provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types involved in creating and managing private certificate authorities (CA) for your organization. The documentation for each action shows the Query API request parameters and the XML response. Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that's tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. Each ACM Private CA API operation has a quota that determines the number of times the operation can be called per second. ACM Private CA throttles API requests at different rates depending on the operation. Throttling means that ACM Private CA rejects an otherwise valid request because the request exceeds the operation's quota for the number of requests per second. When a request is throttled, ACM Private CA returns a ThrottlingException error. ACM Private CA does not guarantee a minimum request rate for APIs. To see an up-to-date list of your ACM Private CA quotas, or to request a quota increase, log into your AWS account and visit the Service Quotas console.

AWS Batch

Batch Using Batch, you can run batch computing workloads on the Cloud. Batch computing is a common means for developers, scientists, and engineers to access large amounts of compute resources. Batch uses the advantages of this computing workload to remove the undifferentiated heavy lifting of configuring and managing required infrastructure. At the same time, it also adopts a familiar batch computing software approach. Given these advantages, Batch can help you to efficiently provision resources in response to jobs submitted, thus effectively helping you to eliminate capacity constraints, reduce compute costs, and deliver your results more quickly. As a fully managed service, Batch can run batch computing workloads of any scale. Batch automatically provisions compute resources and optimizes workload distribution based on the quantity and scale of your specific workloads. With Batch, there's no need to install or manage batch computing software. This means that you can focus your time and energy on analyzing results and solving your specific problems.

Amazon Prometheus Service

Amazon Managed Service for Prometheus

Amazon Appflow

Welcome to the Amazon AppFlow API reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Amazon AppFlow API operations, data types, and errors. Amazon AppFlow is a fully managed integration service that enables you to securely transfer data between software as a service (SaaS) applications like Salesforce, Marketo, Slack, and ServiceNow, and Amazon Web Services like Amazon S3 and Amazon Redshift. Use the following links to get started on the Amazon AppFlow API: Actions : An alphabetical list of all Amazon AppFlow API operations. Data types : An alphabetical list of all Amazon AppFlow data types. Common parameters : Parameters that all Query operations can use. Common errors : Client and server errors that all operations can return. If you're new to Amazon AppFlow, we recommend that you review the Amazon AppFlow User Guide. Amazon AppFlow API users can use vendor-specific mechanisms for OAuth, and include applicable OAuth attributes (such as auth-code and redirecturi) with the connector-specific ConnectorProfileProperties when creating a new connector profile using Amazon AppFlow API operations. For example, Salesforce users can refer to the Authorize Apps with OAuth documentation.

EC2 Image Builder

EC2 Image Builder is a fully managed Amazon Web Services service that makes it easier to automate the creation, management, and deployment of customized, secure, and up-to-date "golden" server images that are pre-installed and pre-configured with software and settings to meet specific IT standards.

AWS IoT Things Graph

AWS IoT Things Graph AWS IoT Things Graph provides an integrated set of tools that enable developers to connect devices and services that use different standards, such as units of measure and communication protocols. AWS IoT Things Graph makes it possible to build IoT applications with little to no code by connecting devices and services and defining how they interact at an abstract level. For more information about how AWS IoT Things Graph works, see the User Guide.

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Amazon Elastic Block Store

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EC2 Image Builder

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Amazon Rekognition

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Amazon CloudWatch Events

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