Mock sample for your project: AWS Signer API

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AWS Signer

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-08-25


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "AWS Signer API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs: no more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, etc.

Description

AWS Signer is a fully managed code signing service to help you ensure the trust and integrity of your code. AWS Signer supports the following applications: With code signing for AWS Lambda, you can sign AWS Lambda deployment packages. Integrated support is provided for Amazon S3, Amazon CloudWatch, and AWS CloudTrail. In order to sign code, you create a signing profile and then use Signer to sign Lambda zip files in S3. With code signing for IoT, you can sign code for any IoT device that is supported by AWS. IoT code signing is available for Amazon FreeRTOS and AWS IoT Device Management, and is integrated with AWS Certificate Manager (ACM). In order to sign code, you import a third-party code signing certificate using ACM, and use that to sign updates in Amazon FreeRTOS and AWS IoT Device Management. For more information about AWS Signer, see the AWS Signer Developer Guide.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Amazon Interactive Video Service

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

Amazon Neptune

Amazon Neptune Amazon Neptune is a fast, reliable, fully-managed graph database service that makes it easy to build and run applications that work with highly connected datasets. The core of Amazon Neptune is a purpose-built, high-performance graph database engine optimized for storing billions of relationships and querying the graph with milliseconds latency. Amazon Neptune supports popular graph models Property Graph and W3C's RDF, and their respective query languages Apache TinkerPop Gremlin and SPARQL, allowing you to easily build queries that efficiently navigate highly connected datasets. Neptune powers graph use cases such as recommendation engines, fraud detection, knowledge graphs, drug discovery, and network security. This interface reference for Amazon Neptune contains documentation for a programming or command line interface you can use to manage Amazon Neptune. Note that Amazon Neptune is asynchronous, which means that some interfaces might require techniques such as polling or callback functions to determine when a command has been applied. In this reference, the parameter descriptions indicate whether a command is applied immediately, on the next instance reboot, or during the maintenance window. The reference structure is as follows, and we list following some related topics from the user guide.

AmazonApiGatewayV2

Amazon API Gateway V2

Amazon Comprehend

Amazon Comprehend is an AWS service for gaining insight into the content of documents. Use these actions to determine the topics contained in your documents, the topics they discuss, the predominant sentiment expressed in them, the predominant language used, and more.

AWS CodeStar Notifications

This AWS CodeStar Notifications API Reference provides descriptions and usage examples of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar Notifications API. You can use the AWS CodeStar Notifications API to work with the following objects: Notification rules, by calling the following: CreateNotificationRule, which creates a notification rule for a resource in your account. DeleteNotificationRule, which deletes a notification rule. DescribeNotificationRule, which provides information about a notification rule. ListNotificationRules, which lists the notification rules associated with your account. UpdateNotificationRule, which changes the name, events, or targets associated with a notification rule. Subscribe, which subscribes a target to a notification rule. Unsubscribe, which removes a target from a notification rule. Targets, by calling the following: DeleteTarget, which removes a notification rule target (SNS topic) from a notification rule. ListTargets, which lists the targets associated with a notification rule. Events, by calling the following: ListEventTypes, which lists the event types you can include in a notification rule. Tags, by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which lists the tags already associated with a notification rule in your account. TagResource, which associates a tag you provide with a notification rule in your account. UntagResource, which removes a tag from a notification rule in your account. For information about how to use AWS CodeStar Notifications, see link in the CodeStarNotifications User Guide.

AWS Certificate Manager

Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager You can use Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager (ACM) to manage SSL/TLS certificates for your Amazon Web Services-based websites and applications. For more information about using ACM, see the Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager User Guide.

Amazon AppStream

Amazon AppStream 2.0 This is the Amazon AppStream 2.0 API Reference. This documentation provides descriptions and syntax for each of the actions and data types in AppStream 2.0. AppStream 2.0 is a fully managed, secure application streaming service that lets you stream desktop applications to users without rewriting applications. AppStream 2.0 manages the AWS resources that are required to host and run your applications, scales automatically, and provides access to your users on demand. You can call the AppStream 2.0 API operations by using an interface VPC endpoint (interface endpoint). For more information, see Access AppStream 2.0 API Operations and CLI Commands Through an Interface VPC Endpoint in the Amazon AppStream 2.0 Administration Guide. To learn more about AppStream 2.0, see the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 product page Amazon AppStream 2.0 documentation

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles Welcome to the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API Reference. This guide provides information about the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API, including supported operations, data types, parameters, and schemas. Amazon Connect Customer Profiles is a unified customer profile for your contact center that has pre-built connectors powered by AppFlow that make it easy to combine customer information from third party applications, such as Salesforce (CRM), ServiceNow (ITSM), and your enterprise resource planning (ERP), with contact history from your Amazon Connect contact center. If you're new to Amazon Connect , you might find it helpful to also review the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide.

AWS IoT Events

AWS IoT Events monitors your equipment or device fleets for failures or changes in operation, and triggers actions when such events occur. You can use AWS IoT Events API operations to create, read, update, and delete inputs and detector models, and to list their versions.

AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

Amazon Connect Participant Service

Amazon Connect is a cloud-based contact center solution that makes it easy to set up and manage a customer contact center and provide reliable customer engagement at any scale. Amazon Connect enables customer contacts through voice or chat. The APIs described here are used by chat participants, such as agents and customers.

AWS Compute Optimizer

Compute Optimizer is a service that analyzes the configuration and utilization metrics of your Amazon Web Services compute resources, such as Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, Lambda functions, and Amazon EBS volumes. It reports whether your resources are optimal, and generates optimization recommendations to reduce the cost and improve the performance of your workloads. Compute Optimizer also provides recent utilization metric data, in addition to projected utilization metric data for the recommendations, which you can use to evaluate which recommendation provides the best price-performance trade-off. The analysis of your usage patterns can help you decide when to move or resize your running resources, and still meet your performance and capacity requirements. For more information about Compute Optimizer, including the required permissions to use the service, see the Compute Optimizer User Guide.

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AWS Migration Hub

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AWS Cost Explorer Service

You can use the Cost Explorer API to programmatically query your cost and usage data. You can query for aggregated data such as total monthly costs or total daily usage. You can also query for granular data. This might include the number of daily write operations for Amazon DynamoDB database tables in your production environment. Service Endpoint The Cost Explorer API provides the following endpoint: https://ce.us-east-1.amazonaws.com For information about the costs that are associated with the Cost Explorer API, see Amazon Web Services Cost Management Pricing.

AWS Batch

Batch Using Batch, you can run batch computing workloads on the Cloud. Batch computing is a common means for developers, scientists, and engineers to access large amounts of compute resources. Batch uses the advantages of this computing workload to remove the undifferentiated heavy lifting of configuring and managing required infrastructure. At the same time, it also adopts a familiar batch computing software approach. Given these advantages, Batch can help you to efficiently provision resources in response to jobs submitted, thus effectively helping you to eliminate capacity constraints, reduce compute costs, and deliver your results more quickly. As a fully managed service, Batch can run batch computing workloads of any scale. Batch automatically provisions compute resources and optimizes workload distribution based on the quantity and scale of your specific workloads. With Batch, there's no need to install or manage batch computing software. This means that you can focus your time and energy on analyzing results and solving your specific problems.

AWS Budgets

The AWS Budgets API enables you to use AWS Budgets to plan your service usage, service costs, and instance reservations. The API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for AWS Budgets. Budgets provide you with a way to see the following information: How close your plan is to your budgeted amount or to the free tier limits Your usage-to-date, including how much you've used of your Reserved Instances (RIs) Your current estimated charges from AWS, and how much your predicted usage will accrue in charges by the end of the month How much of your budget has been used AWS updates your budget status several times a day. Budgets track your unblended costs, subscriptions, refunds, and RIs. You can create the following types of budgets: Cost budgets - Plan how much you want to spend on a service. Usage budgets - Plan how much you want to use one or more services. RI utilization budgets - Define a utilization threshold, and receive alerts when your RI usage falls below that threshold. This lets you see if your RIs are unused or under-utilized. RI coverage budgets - Define a coverage threshold, and receive alerts when the number of your instance hours that are covered by RIs fall below that threshold. This lets you see how much of your instance usage is covered by a reservation. Service Endpoint The AWS Budgets API provides the following endpoint: https://budgets.amazonaws.com For information about costs that are associated with the AWS Budgets API, see AWS Cost Management Pricing.

MonitorManagementClient

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Mixed Reality

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Mixed Reality Resource Provider Proxy API

AWS CodeDeploy

AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy is a deployment service that automates application deployments to Amazon EC2 instances, on-premises instances running in your own facility, serverless AWS Lambda functions, or applications in an Amazon ECS service. You can deploy a nearly unlimited variety of application content, such as an updated Lambda function, updated applications in an Amazon ECS service, code, web and configuration files, executables, packages, scripts, multimedia files, and so on. AWS CodeDeploy can deploy application content stored in Amazon S3 buckets, GitHub repositories, or Bitbucket repositories. You do not need to make changes to your existing code before you can use AWS CodeDeploy. AWS CodeDeploy makes it easier for you to rapidly release new features, helps you avoid downtime during application deployment, and handles the complexity of updating your applications, without many of the risks associated with error-prone manual deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Components Use the information in this guide to help you work with the following AWS CodeDeploy components: Application : A name that uniquely identifies the application you want to deploy. AWS CodeDeploy uses this name, which functions as a container, to ensure the correct combination of revision, deployment configuration, and deployment group are referenced during a deployment. Deployment group : A set of individual instances, CodeDeploy Lambda deployment configuration settings, or an Amazon ECS service and network details. A Lambda deployment group specifies how to route traffic to a new version of a Lambda function. An Amazon ECS deployment group specifies the service created in Amazon ECS to deploy, a load balancer, and a listener to reroute production traffic to an updated containerized application. An EC2/On-premises deployment group contains individually tagged instances, Amazon EC2 instances in Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, or both. All deployment groups can specify optional trigger, alarm, and rollback settings. Deployment configuration : A set of deployment rules and deployment success and failure conditions used by AWS CodeDeploy during a deployment. Deployment : The process and the components used when updating a Lambda function, a containerized application in an Amazon ECS service, or of installing content on one or more instances. Application revisions : For an AWS Lambda deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Lambda function to be updated and one or more functions to validate deployment lifecycle events. For an Amazon ECS deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Amazon ECS task definition, container, and port where production traffic is rerouted. For an EC2/On-premises deployment, this is an archive file that contains source contentβ€”source code, webpages, executable files, and deployment scriptsβ€”along with an AppSpec file. Revisions are stored in Amazon S3 buckets or GitHub repositories. For Amazon S3, a revision is uniquely identified by its Amazon S3 object key and its ETag, version, or both. For GitHub, a revision is uniquely identified by its commit ID. This guide also contains information to help you get details about the instances in your deployments, to make on-premises instances available for AWS CodeDeploy deployments, to get details about a Lambda function deployment, and to get details about Amazon ECS service deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Information Resources AWS CodeDeploy User Guide AWS CodeDeploy API Reference Guide AWS CLI Reference for AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy Developer Forum

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Access Analyzer

Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer helps identify potential resource-access risks by enabling you to identify any policies that grant access to an external principal. It does this by using logic-based reasoning to analyze resource-based policies in your Amazon Web Services environment. An external principal can be another Amazon Web Services account, a root user, an IAM user or role, a federated user, an Amazon Web Services service, or an anonymous user. You can also use IAM Access Analyzer to preview and validate public and cross-account access to your resources before deploying permissions changes. This guide describes the Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about IAM Access Analyzer, see Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer in the IAM User Guide. To start using IAM Access Analyzer, you first need to create an analyzer.