Mock sample for your project: AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority API

Integrate with "AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority API" from amazonaws.com in no time with Mockoon's ready to use mock sample

AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-08-22


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
Improve your integration tests by mocking third-party APIs and cover more edge cases: slow response time, random failures, etc.

Description

This is the ACM Private CA API Reference. It provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types involved in creating and managing private certificate authorities (CA) for your organization. The documentation for each action shows the Query API request parameters and the XML response. Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that's tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. Each ACM Private CA API operation has a quota that determines the number of times the operation can be called per second. ACM Private CA throttles API requests at different rates depending on the operation. Throttling means that ACM Private CA rejects an otherwise valid request because the request exceeds the operation's quota for the number of requests per second. When a request is throttled, ACM Private CA returns a ThrottlingException error. ACM Private CA does not guarantee a minimum request rate for APIs. To see an up-to-date list of your ACM Private CA quotas, or to request a quota increase, log into your AWS account and visit the Service Quotas console.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS OpsWorks

AWS OpsWorks Welcome to the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API Reference. This guide provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for AWS OpsWorks Stacks actions and data types, including common parameters and error codes. AWS OpsWorks Stacks is an application management service that provides an integrated experience for overseeing the complete application lifecycle. For information about this product, go to the AWS OpsWorks details page. SDKs and CLI The most common way to use the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API is by using the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) or by using one of the AWS SDKs to implement applications in your preferred language. For more information, see: AWS CLI AWS SDK for Java AWS SDK for .NET AWS SDK for PHP 2 AWS SDK for Ruby AWS SDK for Node.js AWS SDK for Python(Boto) Endpoints AWS OpsWorks Stacks supports the following endpoints, all HTTPS. You must connect to one of the following endpoints. Stacks can only be accessed or managed within the endpoint in which they are created. opsworks.us-east-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-east-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.ca-central-1.amazonaws.com (API only; not available in the AWS console) opsworks.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-west-3.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-northeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-northeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.sa-east-1.amazonaws.com Chef Versions When you call CreateStack, CloneStack, or UpdateStack we recommend you use the ConfigurationManager parameter to specify the Chef version. The recommended and default value for Linux stacks is currently 12. Windows stacks use Chef 12.2. For more information, see Chef Versions. You can specify Chef 12, 11.10, or 11.4 for your Linux stack. We recommend migrating your existing Linux stacks to Chef 12 as soon as possible.

Amazon CloudDirectory

Amazon Cloud Directory Amazon Cloud Directory is a component of the AWS Directory Service that simplifies the development and management of cloud-scale web, mobile, and IoT applications. This guide describes the Cloud Directory operations that you can call programmatically and includes detailed information on data types and errors. For information about Cloud Directory features, see AWS Directory Service and the Amazon Cloud Directory Developer Guide.

Amazon Elasticsearch Service

Amazon Elasticsearch Configuration Service Use the Amazon Elasticsearch Configuration API to create, configure, and manage Elasticsearch domains. For sample code that uses the Configuration API, see the Amazon Elasticsearch Service Developer Guide. The guide also contains sample code for sending signed HTTP requests to the Elasticsearch APIs. The endpoint for configuration service requests is region-specific: es. region.amazonaws.com. For example, es.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. For a current list of supported regions and endpoints, see Regions and Endpoints.

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

AWS IoT Fleet Hub

With Fleet Hub for AWS IoT Device Management you can build stand-alone web applications for monitoring the health of your device fleets. Fleet Hub for AWS IoT Device Management is in public preview and is subject to change.

CodeArtifact

AWS CodeArtifact is a fully managed artifact repository compatible with language-native package managers and build tools such as npm, Apache Maven, and pip. You can use CodeArtifact to share packages with development teams and pull packages. Packages can be pulled from both public and CodeArtifact repositories. You can also create an upstream relationship between a CodeArtifact repository and another repository, which effectively merges their contents from the point of view of a package manager client. AWS CodeArtifact Components Use the information in this guide to help you work with the following CodeArtifact components: Repository : A CodeArtifact repository contains a set of package versions, each of which maps to a set of assets, or files. Repositories are polyglot, so a single repository can contain packages of any supported type. Each repository exposes endpoints for fetching and publishing packages using tools like the npm CLI, the Maven CLI ( mvn ), and pip . Domain : Repositories are aggregated into a higher-level entity known as a domain. All package assets and metadata are stored in the domain, but are consumed through repositories. A given package asset, such as a Maven JAR file, is stored once per domain, no matter how many repositories it's present in. All of the assets and metadata in a domain are encrypted with the same customer master key (CMK) stored in AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS). Each repository is a member of a single domain and can't be moved to a different domain. The domain allows organizational policy to be applied across multiple repositories, such as which accounts can access repositories in the domain, and which public repositories can be used as sources of packages. Although an organization can have multiple domains, we recommend a single production domain that contains all published artifacts so that teams can find and share packages across their organization. Package : A package is a bundle of software and the metadata required to resolve dependencies and install the software. CodeArtifact supports npm, PyPI, and Maven package formats. In CodeArtifact, a package consists of: A name (for example, webpack is the name of a popular npm package) An optional namespace (for example, @types in @types/node) A set of versions (for example, 1.0.0, 1.0.1, 1.0.2, etc.) Package-level metadata (for example, npm tags) Package version : A version of a package, such as @types/node 12.6.9. The version number format and semantics vary for different package formats. For example, npm package versions must conform to the Semantic Versioning specification. In CodeArtifact, a package version consists of the version identifier, metadata at the package version level, and a set of assets. Upstream repository : One repository is upstream of another when the package versions in it can be accessed from the repository endpoint of the downstream repository, effectively merging the contents of the two repositories from the point of view of a client. CodeArtifact allows creating an upstream relationship between two repositories. Asset : An individual file stored in CodeArtifact associated with a package version, such as an npm.tgz file or Maven POM and JAR files. CodeArtifact supports these operations: AssociateExternalConnection : Adds an existing external connection to a repository. CopyPackageVersions : Copies package versions from one repository to another repository in the same domain. CreateDomain : Creates a domain CreateRepository : Creates a CodeArtifact repository in a domain. DeleteDomain : Deletes a domain. You cannot delete a domain that contains repositories. DeleteDomainPermissionsPolicy : Deletes the resource policy that is set on a domain. DeletePackageVersions : Deletes versions of a package. After a package has been deleted, it can be republished, but its assets and metadata cannot be restored because they have been permanently removed from storage. DeleteRepository : Deletes a repository. DeleteRepositoryPermissionsPolicy : Deletes the resource policy that is set on a repository. DescribeDomain : Returns a DomainDescription object that contains information about the requested domain. DescribePackageVersion : Returns a PackageVersionDescription object that contains details about a package version. DescribeRepository : Returns a RepositoryDescription object that contains detailed information about the requested repository. DisposePackageVersions : Disposes versions of a package. A package version with the status Disposed cannot be restored because they have been permanently removed from storage. DisassociateExternalConnection : Removes an existing external connection from a repository. GetAuthorizationToken : Generates a temporary authorization token for accessing repositories in the domain. The token expires the authorization period has passed. The default authorization period is 12 hours and can be customized to any length with a maximum of 12 hours. GetDomainPermissionsPolicy : Returns the policy of a resource that is attached to the specified domain. GetPackageVersionAsset : Returns the contents of an asset that is in a package version. GetPackageVersionReadme : Gets the readme file or descriptive text for a package version. GetRepositoryEndpoint : Returns the endpoint of a repository for a specific package format. A repository has one endpoint for each package format: npm pypi maven GetRepositoryPermissionsPolicy : Returns the resource policy that is set on a repository. ListDomains : Returns a list of DomainSummary objects. Each returned DomainSummary object contains information about a domain. ListPackages : Lists the packages in a repository. ListPackageVersionAssets : Lists the assets for a given package version. ListPackageVersionDependencies : Returns a list of the direct dependencies for a package version. ListPackageVersions : Returns a list of package versions for a specified package in a repository. ListRepositories : Returns a list of repositories owned by the AWS account that called this method. ListRepositoriesInDomain : Returns a list of the repositories in a domain. PutDomainPermissionsPolicy : Attaches a resource policy to a domain. PutRepositoryPermissionsPolicy : Sets the resource policy on a repository that specifies permissions to access it. UpdatePackageVersionsStatus : Updates the status of one or more versions of a package. UpdateRepository : Updates the properties of a repository.

Firewall Management Service

This is the Firewall Manager API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Firewall Manager API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about Firewall Manager features, see the Firewall Manager Developer Guide. Some API actions require explicit resource permissions. For information, see the developer guide topic Firewall Manager required permissions for API actions.

AWS CloudTrail

CloudTrail This is the CloudTrail API Reference. It provides descriptions of actions, data types, common parameters, and common errors for CloudTrail. CloudTrail is a web service that records Amazon Web Services API calls for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. The recorded information includes the identity of the user, the start time of the Amazon Web Services API call, the source IP address, the request parameters, and the response elements returned by the service. As an alternative to the API, you can use one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs, which consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .NET, iOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide programmatic access to CloudTrail. For example, the SDKs handle cryptographically signing requests, managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools to Build on Amazon Web Services. See the CloudTrail User Guide for information about the data that is included with each Amazon Web Services API call listed in the log files.

Amazon CloudSearch Domain

You use the AmazonCloudSearch2013 API to upload documents to a search domain and search those documents. The endpoints for submitting UploadDocuments, Search, and Suggest requests are domain-specific. To get the endpoints for your domain, use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service DescribeDomains action. The domain endpoints are also displayed on the domain dashboard in the Amazon CloudSearch console. You submit suggest requests to the search endpoint. For more information, see the Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide.

Elastic Load Balancing

Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer can distribute incoming traffic across your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered instances and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy instances. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer and a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the instances. Elastic Load Balancing supports three types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. You can select a load balancer based on your application needs. For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. This reference covers the 2012-06-01 API, which supports Classic Load Balancers. The 2015-12-01 API supports Application Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers. To get started, create a load balancer with one or more listeners using CreateLoadBalancer. Register your instances with the load balancer using RegisterInstancesWithLoadBalancer. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds with a 200 OK response code.

AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

Application Auto Scaling

With Application Auto Scaling, you can configure automatic scaling for the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 fleets Amazon Aurora Replicas Amazon Comprehend document classification and entity recognizer endpoints Amazon DynamoDB tables and global secondary indexes throughput capacity Amazon ECS services Amazon ElastiCache for Redis clusters (replication groups) Amazon EMR clusters Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra) tables Lambda function provisioned concurrency Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka broker storage Amazon SageMaker endpoint variants Spot Fleet (Amazon EC2) requests Custom resources provided by your own applications or services API Summary The Application Auto Scaling service API includes three key sets of actions: Register and manage scalable targets - Register Amazon Web Services or custom resources as scalable targets (a resource that Application Auto Scaling can scale), set minimum and maximum capacity limits, and retrieve information on existing scalable targets. Configure and manage automatic scaling - Define scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources in response to CloudWatch alarms, schedule one-time or recurring scaling actions, and retrieve your recent scaling activity history. Suspend and resume scaling - Temporarily suspend and later resume automatic scaling by calling the RegisterScalableTarget API action for any Application Auto Scaling scalable target. You can suspend and resume (individually or in combination) scale-out activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, scale-in activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, and scheduled scaling. To learn more about Application Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for Application Auto Scaling actions, see the Application Auto Scaling User Guide.

Other APIs in the same category

Certificates API Client

azure.com

MonitorManagementClient

azure.com

WebApplicationFirewallManagement

azure.com
APIs to manage web application firewall rules.

ContainerServiceClient

azure.com
The Container Service Client.

ContainerRegistryManagementClient

azure.com

Azure Data Migration Service Resource Provider

azure.com
The Data Migration Service helps people migrate their data from on-premise database servers to Azure, or from older database software to newer software. The service manages one or more workers that are joined to a customer's virtual network, which is assumed to provide connectivity to their databases. To avoid frequent updates to the resource provider, data migration tasks are implemented by the resource provider in a generic way as task resources, each of which has a task type (which identifies the type of work to run), input, and output. The client is responsible for providing appropriate task type and inputs, which will be passed through unexamined to the machines that implement the functionality, and for understanding the output, which is passed back unexamined to the client.

Cosmos DB

azure.com
Azure Cosmos DB Database Service Resource Provider REST API

QnAMaker Runtime Client

azure.com
An API for QnAMaker runtime

FrontDoorManagementClient

azure.com
Use these APIs to manage Azure Front Door resources through the Azure Resource Manager. You must make sure that requests made to these resources are secure.

Machine Learning Workspaces Management Client

azure.com
These APIs allow end users to operate on Azure Machine Learning Workspace resources. They support CRUD operations for Azure Machine Learning Workspaces.

DnsManagementClient

azure.com
The DNS Management Client.

HDInsightJobManagementClient

azure.com
The HDInsight Job Client.