Mock sample for your project: AWS Global Accelerator API

Integrate with "AWS Global Accelerator API" from amazonaws.com in no time with Mockoon's ready to use mock sample

AWS Global Accelerator

amazonaws.com

Version: 2018-08-08


Use this API in your project

Start working with "AWS Global Accelerator API" right away by using this ready-to-use mock sample. API mocking can greatly speed up your application development by removing all the tedious tasks or issues: API key provisioning, account creation, unplanned downtime, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Service Catalog App Registry

Amazon Web Services Service Catalog AppRegistry enables organizations to understand the application context of their Amazon Web Services resources. AppRegistry provides a repository of your applications, their resources, and the application metadata that you use within your enterprise.

AWS Transfer Family

Amazon Web Services Transfer Family is a fully managed service that enables the transfer of files over the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), File Transfer Protocol over SSL (FTPS), or Secure Shell (SSH) File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) directly into and out of Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3). Amazon Web Services helps you seamlessly migrate your file transfer workflows to Amazon Web Services Transfer Family by integrating with existing authentication systems, and providing DNS routing with Amazon Route 53 so nothing changes for your customers and partners, or their applications. With your data in Amazon S3, you can use it with Amazon Web Services services for processing, analytics, machine learning, and archiving. Getting started with Amazon Web Services Transfer Family is easy since there is no infrastructure to buy and set up.

Amazon Transcribe Service

Operations and objects for transcribing speech to text.

Amazon SageMaker Runtime

The Amazon SageMaker runtime API.

Amazon Simple Queue Service

Welcome to the Amazon SQS API Reference. Amazon SQS is a reliable, highly-scalable hosted queue for storing messages as they travel between applications or microservices. Amazon SQS moves data between distributed application components and helps you decouple these components. For information on the permissions you need to use this API, see Identity and access management in the Amazon SQS Developer Guide. You can use Amazon Web Services SDKs to access Amazon SQS using your favorite programming language. The SDKs perform tasks such as the following automatically: Cryptographically sign your service requests Retry requests Handle error responses Additional information Amazon SQS Product Page Amazon SQS Developer Guide Making API Requests Amazon SQS Message Attributes Amazon SQS Dead-Letter Queues Amazon SQS in the Command Line Interface Amazon Web Services General Reference Regions and Endpoints

AWS Budgets

The AWS Budgets API enables you to use AWS Budgets to plan your service usage, service costs, and instance reservations. The API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for AWS Budgets. Budgets provide you with a way to see the following information: How close your plan is to your budgeted amount or to the free tier limits Your usage-to-date, including how much you've used of your Reserved Instances (RIs) Your current estimated charges from AWS, and how much your predicted usage will accrue in charges by the end of the month How much of your budget has been used AWS updates your budget status several times a day. Budgets track your unblended costs, subscriptions, refunds, and RIs. You can create the following types of budgets: Cost budgets - Plan how much you want to spend on a service. Usage budgets - Plan how much you want to use one or more services. RI utilization budgets - Define a utilization threshold, and receive alerts when your RI usage falls below that threshold. This lets you see if your RIs are unused or under-utilized. RI coverage budgets - Define a coverage threshold, and receive alerts when the number of your instance hours that are covered by RIs fall below that threshold. This lets you see how much of your instance usage is covered by a reservation. Service Endpoint The AWS Budgets API provides the following endpoint: https://budgets.amazonaws.com For information about costs that are associated with the AWS Budgets API, see AWS Cost Management Pricing.

AWS Amplify

Amplify enables developers to develop and deploy cloud-powered mobile and web apps. The Amplify Console provides a continuous delivery and hosting service for web applications. For more information, see the Amplify Console User Guide. The Amplify Framework is a comprehensive set of SDKs, libraries, tools, and documentation for client app development. For more information, see the Amplify Framework.

AWS Database Migration Service

Database Migration Service Database Migration Service (DMS) can migrate your data to and from the most widely used commercial and open-source databases such as Oracle, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, Amazon Redshift, MariaDB, Amazon Aurora, MySQL, and SAP Adaptive Server Enterprise (ASE). The service supports homogeneous migrations such as Oracle to Oracle, as well as heterogeneous migrations between different database platforms, such as Oracle to MySQL or SQL Server to PostgreSQL. For more information about DMS, see What Is Database Migration Service? in the Database Migration Service User Guide.

AWS Migration Hub

The AWS Migration Hub API methods help to obtain server and application migration status and integrate your resource-specific migration tool by providing a programmatic interface to Migration Hub. Remember that you must set your AWS Migration Hub home region before you call any of these APIs, or a HomeRegionNotSetException error will be returned. Also, you must make the API calls while in your home region.

AWS Systems Manager Incident Manager Contacts

Systems Manager Incident Manager is an incident management console designed to help users mitigate and recover from incidents affecting their Amazon Web Services-hosted applications. An incident is any unplanned interruption or reduction in quality of services. Incident Manager increases incident resolution by notifying responders of impact, highlighting relevant troubleshooting data, and providing collaboration tools to get services back up and running. To achieve the primary goal of reducing the time-to-resolution of critical incidents, Incident Manager automates response plans and enables responder team escalation.

AWS IoT 1-Click Projects Service

The AWS IoT 1-Click Projects API Reference

AWS Audit Manager

Welcome to the Audit Manager API reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Audit Manager API operations, data types, and errors. Audit Manager is a service that provides automated evidence collection so that you can continuously audit your Amazon Web Services usage, and assess the effectiveness of your controls to better manage risk and simplify compliance. Audit Manager provides pre-built frameworks that structure and automate assessments for a given compliance standard. Frameworks include a pre-built collection of controls with descriptions and testing procedures, which are grouped according to the requirements of the specified compliance standard or regulation. You can also customize frameworks and controls to support internal audits with unique requirements. Use the following links to get started with the Audit Manager API: Actions : An alphabetical list of all Audit Manager API operations. Data types : An alphabetical list of all Audit Manager data types. Common parameters : Parameters that all Query operations can use. Common errors : Client and server errors that all operations can return. If you're new to Audit Manager, we recommend that you review the Audit Manager User Guide.

Other APIs in the same category

AutomationManagement

azure.com

Amazon CloudSearch

Amazon CloudSearch Configuration Service You use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service to create, configure, and manage search domains. Configuration service requests are submitted using the AWS Query protocol. AWS Query requests are HTTP or HTTPS requests submitted via HTTP GET or POST with a query parameter named Action. The endpoint for configuration service requests is region-specific: cloudsearch. region.amazonaws.com. For example, cloudsearch.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. For a current list of supported regions and endpoints, see Regions and Endpoints.

AzureBridgeAdminClient

azure.com
AzureBridge Admin Client.

AWS Network Manager

Transit Gateway Network Manager (Network Manager) enables you to create a global network, in which you can monitor your AWS and on-premises networks that are built around transit gateways. The Network Manager APIs are supported in the US West (Oregon) Region only. You must specify the us-west-2 Region in all requests made to Network Manager.

AWS Application Cost Profiler

This reference provides descriptions of the AWS Application Cost Profiler API. The AWS Application Cost Profiler API provides programmatic access to view, create, update, and delete application cost report definitions, as well as to import your usage data into the Application Cost Profiler service. For more information about using this service, see the AWS Application Cost Profiler User Guide.

Amazon Interactive Video Service

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

AWS Migration Hub Config

The AWS Migration Hub home region APIs are available specifically for working with your Migration Hub home region. You can use these APIs to determine a home region, as well as to create and work with controls that describe the home region. You must make API calls for write actions (create, notify, associate, disassociate, import, or put) while in your home region, or a HomeRegionNotSetException error is returned. API calls for read actions (list, describe, stop, and delete) are permitted outside of your home region. If you call a write API outside the home region, an InvalidInputException is returned. You can call GetHomeRegion action to obtain the account's Migration Hub home region. For specific API usage, see the sections that follow in this AWS Migration Hub Home Region API reference.

AWS CodeDeploy

AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy is a deployment service that automates application deployments to Amazon EC2 instances, on-premises instances running in your own facility, serverless AWS Lambda functions, or applications in an Amazon ECS service. You can deploy a nearly unlimited variety of application content, such as an updated Lambda function, updated applications in an Amazon ECS service, code, web and configuration files, executables, packages, scripts, multimedia files, and so on. AWS CodeDeploy can deploy application content stored in Amazon S3 buckets, GitHub repositories, or Bitbucket repositories. You do not need to make changes to your existing code before you can use AWS CodeDeploy. AWS CodeDeploy makes it easier for you to rapidly release new features, helps you avoid downtime during application deployment, and handles the complexity of updating your applications, without many of the risks associated with error-prone manual deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Components Use the information in this guide to help you work with the following AWS CodeDeploy components: Application : A name that uniquely identifies the application you want to deploy. AWS CodeDeploy uses this name, which functions as a container, to ensure the correct combination of revision, deployment configuration, and deployment group are referenced during a deployment. Deployment group : A set of individual instances, CodeDeploy Lambda deployment configuration settings, or an Amazon ECS service and network details. A Lambda deployment group specifies how to route traffic to a new version of a Lambda function. An Amazon ECS deployment group specifies the service created in Amazon ECS to deploy, a load balancer, and a listener to reroute production traffic to an updated containerized application. An EC2/On-premises deployment group contains individually tagged instances, Amazon EC2 instances in Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, or both. All deployment groups can specify optional trigger, alarm, and rollback settings. Deployment configuration : A set of deployment rules and deployment success and failure conditions used by AWS CodeDeploy during a deployment. Deployment : The process and the components used when updating a Lambda function, a containerized application in an Amazon ECS service, or of installing content on one or more instances. Application revisions : For an AWS Lambda deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Lambda function to be updated and one or more functions to validate deployment lifecycle events. For an Amazon ECS deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Amazon ECS task definition, container, and port where production traffic is rerouted. For an EC2/On-premises deployment, this is an archive file that contains source contentβ€”source code, webpages, executable files, and deployment scriptsβ€”along with an AppSpec file. Revisions are stored in Amazon S3 buckets or GitHub repositories. For Amazon S3, a revision is uniquely identified by its Amazon S3 object key and its ETag, version, or both. For GitHub, a revision is uniquely identified by its commit ID. This guide also contains information to help you get details about the instances in your deployments, to make on-premises instances available for AWS CodeDeploy deployments, to get details about a Lambda function deployment, and to get details about Amazon ECS service deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Information Resources AWS CodeDeploy User Guide AWS CodeDeploy API Reference Guide AWS CLI Reference for AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy Developer Forum

FabricAdminClient

azure.com
Network operation results.

AWS IoT Jobs Data Plane

AWS IoT Jobs is a service that allows you to define a set of jobs β€” remote operations that are sent to and executed on one or more devices connected to AWS IoT. For example, you can define a job that instructs a set of devices to download and install application or firmware updates, reboot, rotate certificates, or perform remote troubleshooting operations. To create a job, you make a job document which is a description of the remote operations to be performed, and you specify a list of targets that should perform the operations. The targets can be individual things, thing groups or both. AWS IoT Jobs sends a message to inform the targets that a job is available. The target starts the execution of the job by downloading the job document, performing the operations it specifies, and reporting its progress to AWS IoT. The Jobs service provides commands to track the progress of a job on a specific target and for all the targets of the job

StorageManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Storage Management Client.

Amazon Managed Blockchain

Amazon Managed Blockchain is a fully managed service for creating and managing blockchain networks using open-source frameworks. Blockchain allows you to build applications where multiple parties can securely and transparently run transactions and share data without the need for a trusted, central authority. Managed Blockchain supports the Hyperledger Fabric and Ethereum open-source frameworks. Because of fundamental differences between the frameworks, some API actions or data types may only apply in the context of one framework and not the other. For example, actions related to Hyperledger Fabric network members such as CreateMember and DeleteMember do not apply to Ethereum. The description for each action indicates the framework or frameworks to which it applies. Data types and properties that apply only in the context of a particular framework are similarly indicated.