Mock sample for your project: Alexa For Business API

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Alexa For Business

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-11-09


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Description

Alexa for Business helps you use Alexa in your organization. Alexa for Business provides you with the tools to manage Alexa devices, enroll your users, and assign skills, at scale. You can build your own context-aware voice skills using the Alexa Skills Kit and the Alexa for Business API operations. You can also make these available as private skills for your organization. Alexa for Business makes it efficient to voice-enable your products and services, thus providing context-aware voice experiences for your customers. Device makers building with the Alexa Voice Service (AVS) can create fully integrated solutions, register their products with Alexa for Business, and manage them as shared devices in their organization.

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