Mock sample for your project: AWS CodeBuild API

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AWS CodeBuild

amazonaws.com

Version: 2016-10-06


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Description

CodeBuild CodeBuild is a fully managed build service in the cloud. CodeBuild compiles your source code, runs unit tests, and produces artifacts that are ready to deploy. CodeBuild eliminates the need to provision, manage, and scale your own build servers. It provides prepackaged build environments for the most popular programming languages and build tools, such as Apache Maven, Gradle, and more. You can also fully customize build environments in CodeBuild to use your own build tools. CodeBuild scales automatically to meet peak build requests. You pay only for the build time you consume. For more information about CodeBuild, see the CodeBuild User Guide.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Amazon Lex Model Building Service

Amazon Lex Build-Time Actions Amazon Lex is an AWS service for building conversational voice and text interfaces. Use these actions to create, update, and delete conversational bots for new and existing client applications.

AWS IoT Core Device Advisor

AWS IoT Core Device Advisor is a cloud-based, fully managed test capability for validating IoT devices during device software development. Device Advisor provides pre-built tests that you can use to validate IoT devices for reliable and secure connectivity with AWS IoT Core before deploying devices to production. By using Device Advisor, you can confirm that your devices can connect to AWS IoT Core, follow security best practices and, if applicable, receive software updates from IoT Device Management. You can also download signed qualification reports to submit to the AWS Partner Network to get your device qualified for the AWS Partner Device Catalog without the need to send your device in and wait for it to be tested.

Amazon Cognito Sync

Amazon Cognito Sync Amazon Cognito Sync provides an AWS service and client library that enable cross-device syncing of application-related user data. High-level client libraries are available for both iOS and Android. You can use these libraries to persist data locally so that it's available even if the device is offline. Developer credentials don't need to be stored on the mobile device to access the service. You can use Amazon Cognito to obtain a normalized user ID and credentials. User data is persisted in a dataset that can store up to 1 MB of key-value pairs, and you can have up to 20 datasets per user identity. With Amazon Cognito Sync, the data stored for each identity is accessible only to credentials assigned to that identity. In order to use the Cognito Sync service, you need to make API calls using credentials retrieved with Amazon Cognito Identity service. If you want to use Cognito Sync in an Android or iOS application, you will probably want to make API calls via the AWS Mobile SDK. To learn more, see the Developer Guide for Android and the Developer Guide for iOS.

Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX)

DAX is a managed caching service engineered for Amazon DynamoDB. DAX dramatically speeds up database reads by caching frequently-accessed data from DynamoDB, so applications can access that data with sub-millisecond latency. You can create a DAX cluster easily, using the AWS Management Console. With a few simple modifications to your code, your application can begin taking advantage of the DAX cluster and realize significant improvements in read performance.

AWS DataSync

DataSync DataSync is a managed data transfer service that makes it simpler for you to automate moving data between on-premises storage and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) or Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS). This API interface reference for DataSync contains documentation for a programming interface that you can use to manage DataSync.

Amazon CloudFront

Amazon CloudFront This is the Amazon CloudFront API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about CloudFront API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about CloudFront features, see the Amazon CloudFront Developer Guide.

AWS Data Exchange

AWS Data Exchange is a service that makes it easy for AWS customers to exchange data in the cloud. You can use the AWS Data Exchange APIs to create, update, manage, and access file-based data set in the AWS Cloud. As a subscriber, you can view and access the data sets that you have an entitlement to through a subscription. You can use the APIS to download or copy your entitled data sets to Amazon S3 for use across a variety of AWS analytics and machine learning services. As a provider, you can create and manage your data sets that you would like to publish to a product. Being able to package and provide your data sets into products requires a few steps to determine eligibility. For more information, visit the AWS Data Exchange User Guide. A data set is a collection of data that can be changed or updated over time. Data sets can be updated using revisions, which represent a new version or incremental change to a data set. A revision contains one or more assets. An asset in AWS Data Exchange is a piece of data that can be stored as an Amazon S3 object. The asset can be a structured data file, an image file, or some other data file. Jobs are asynchronous import or export operations used to create or copy assets.

AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

AWS CodeStar connections

AWS CodeStar Connections This AWS CodeStar Connections API Reference provides descriptions and usage examples of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar Connections API. You can use the connections API to work with connections and installations. Connections are configurations that you use to connect AWS resources to external code repositories. Each connection is a resource that can be given to services such as CodePipeline to connect to a third-party repository such as Bitbucket. For example, you can add the connection in CodePipeline so that it triggers your pipeline when a code change is made to your third-party code repository. Each connection is named and associated with a unique ARN that is used to reference the connection. When you create a connection, the console initiates a third-party connection handshake. Installations are the apps that are used to conduct this handshake. For example, the installation for the Bitbucket provider type is the Bitbucket app. When you create a connection, you can choose an existing installation or create one. When you want to create a connection to an installed provider type such as GitHub Enterprise Server, you create a host for your connections. You can work with connections by calling: CreateConnection, which creates a uniquely named connection that can be referenced by services such as CodePipeline. DeleteConnection, which deletes the specified connection. GetConnection, which returns information about the connection, including the connection status. ListConnections, which lists the connections associated with your account. You can work with hosts by calling: CreateHost, which creates a host that represents the infrastructure where your provider is installed. DeleteHost, which deletes the specified host. GetHost, which returns information about the host, including the setup status. ListHosts, which lists the hosts associated with your account. You can work with tags in AWS CodeStar Connections by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeStar Connections. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeStar Connections. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeStar Connections. For information about how to use AWS CodeStar Connections, see the Developer Tools User Guide.

Amazon CloudSearch

Amazon CloudSearch Configuration Service You use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service to create, configure, and manage search domains. Configuration service requests are submitted using the AWS Query protocol. AWS Query requests are HTTP or HTTPS requests submitted via HTTP GET or POST with a query parameter named Action. The endpoint for configuration service requests is region-specific: cloudsearch. region.amazonaws.com. For example, cloudsearch.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. For a current list of supported regions and endpoints, see Regions and Endpoints.

AWS App Mesh

App Mesh is a service mesh based on the Envoy proxy that makes it easy to monitor and control microservices. App Mesh standardizes how your microservices communicate, giving you end-to-end visibility and helping to ensure high availability for your applications. App Mesh gives you consistent visibility and network traffic controls for every microservice in an application. You can use App Mesh with Amazon Web Services Fargate, Amazon ECS, Amazon EKS, Kubernetes on Amazon Web Services, and Amazon EC2. App Mesh supports microservice applications that use service discovery naming for their components. For more information about service discovery on Amazon ECS, see Service Discovery in the Amazon Elastic Container Service Developer Guide. Kubernetes kube-dns and coredns are supported. For more information, see DNS for Services and Pods in the Kubernetes documentation.

Other APIs in the same category

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

AWS IoT Events Data

AWS IoT Events monitors your equipment or device fleets for failures or changes in operation, and triggers actions when such events occur. You can use AWS IoT Events Data API commands to send inputs to detectors, list detectors, and view or update a detector's status. For more information, see What is AWS IoT Events? in the AWS IoT Events Developer Guide.

Amazon Connect Contact Lens

Contact Lens for Amazon Connect enables you to analyze conversations between customer and agents, by using speech transcription, natural language processing, and intelligent search capabilities. It performs sentiment analysis, detects issues, and enables you to automatically categorize contacts. Contact Lens for Amazon Connect provides both real-time and post-call analytics of customer-agent conversations. For more information, see Analyze conversations using Contact Lens in the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide.

Amazon Kinesis Firehose

Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose API Reference Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose is a fully managed service that delivers real-time streaming data to destinations such as Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES), Amazon Redshift, and Splunk.

Amazon Cognito Sync

Amazon Cognito Sync Amazon Cognito Sync provides an AWS service and client library that enable cross-device syncing of application-related user data. High-level client libraries are available for both iOS and Android. You can use these libraries to persist data locally so that it's available even if the device is offline. Developer credentials don't need to be stored on the mobile device to access the service. You can use Amazon Cognito to obtain a normalized user ID and credentials. User data is persisted in a dataset that can store up to 1 MB of key-value pairs, and you can have up to 20 datasets per user identity. With Amazon Cognito Sync, the data stored for each identity is accessible only to credentials assigned to that identity. In order to use the Cognito Sync service, you need to make API calls using credentials retrieved with Amazon Cognito Identity service. If you want to use Cognito Sync in an Android or iOS application, you will probably want to make API calls via the AWS Mobile SDK. To learn more, see the Developer Guide for Android and the Developer Guide for iOS.

Application Auto Scaling

With Application Auto Scaling, you can configure automatic scaling for the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 fleets Amazon Aurora Replicas Amazon Comprehend document classification and entity recognizer endpoints Amazon DynamoDB tables and global secondary indexes throughput capacity Amazon ECS services Amazon ElastiCache for Redis clusters (replication groups) Amazon EMR clusters Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra) tables Lambda function provisioned concurrency Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka broker storage Amazon SageMaker endpoint variants Spot Fleet (Amazon EC2) requests Custom resources provided by your own applications or services API Summary The Application Auto Scaling service API includes three key sets of actions: Register and manage scalable targets - Register Amazon Web Services or custom resources as scalable targets (a resource that Application Auto Scaling can scale), set minimum and maximum capacity limits, and retrieve information on existing scalable targets. Configure and manage automatic scaling - Define scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources in response to CloudWatch alarms, schedule one-time or recurring scaling actions, and retrieve your recent scaling activity history. Suspend and resume scaling - Temporarily suspend and later resume automatic scaling by calling the RegisterScalableTarget API action for any Application Auto Scaling scalable target. You can suspend and resume (individually or in combination) scale-out activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, scale-in activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, and scheduled scaling. To learn more about Application Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for Application Auto Scaling actions, see the Application Auto Scaling User Guide.

AWS Config

Config Config provides a way to keep track of the configurations of all the Amazon Web Services resources associated with your Amazon Web Services account. You can use Config to get the current and historical configurations of each Amazon Web Services resource and also to get information about the relationship between the resources. An Amazon Web Services resource can be an Amazon Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance, an Elastic Block Store (EBS) volume, an elastic network Interface (ENI), or a security group. For a complete list of resources currently supported by Config, see Supported Amazon Web Services resources. You can access and manage Config through the Amazon Web Services Management Console, the Amazon Web Services Command Line Interface (Amazon Web Services CLI), the Config API, or the Amazon Web Services SDKs for Config. This reference guide contains documentation for the Config API and the Amazon Web Services CLI commands that you can use to manage Config. The Config API uses the Signature Version 4 protocol for signing requests. For more information about how to sign a request with this protocol, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process. For detailed information about Config features and their associated actions or commands, as well as how to work with Amazon Web Services Management Console, see What Is Config in the Config Developer Guide.

AWS DataSync

DataSync DataSync is a managed data transfer service that makes it simpler for you to automate moving data between on-premises storage and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) or Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS). This API interface reference for DataSync contains documentation for a programming interface that you can use to manage DataSync.

AWS Storage Gateway

Storage Gateway Service Storage Gateway is the service that connects an on-premises software appliance with cloud-based storage to provide seamless and secure integration between an organization's on-premises IT environment and the Amazon Web Services storage infrastructure. The service enables you to securely upload data to the Cloud for cost effective backup and rapid disaster recovery. Use the following links to get started using the Storage Gateway Service API Reference : Storage Gateway required request headers : Describes the required headers that you must send with every POST request to Storage Gateway. Signing requests : Storage Gateway requires that you authenticate every request you send; this topic describes how sign such a request. Error responses : Provides reference information about Storage Gateway errors. Operations in Storage Gateway : Contains detailed descriptions of all Storage Gateway operations, their request parameters, response elements, possible errors, and examples of requests and responses. Storage Gateway endpoints and quotas : Provides a list of each Region and the endpoints available for use with Storage Gateway. Storage Gateway resource IDs are in uppercase. When you use these resource IDs with the Amazon EC2 API, EC2 expects resource IDs in lowercase. You must change your resource ID to lowercase to use it with the EC2 API. For example, in Storage Gateway the ID for a volume might be vol-AA22BB012345DAF670. When you use this ID with the EC2 API, you must change it to vol-aa22bb012345daf670. Otherwise, the EC2 API might not behave as expected. IDs for Storage Gateway volumes and Amazon EBS snapshots created from gateway volumes are changing to a longer format. Starting in December 2016, all new volumes and snapshots will be created with a 17-character string. Starting in April 2016, you will be able to use these longer IDs so you can test your systems with the new format. For more information, see Longer EC2 and EBS resource IDs. For example, a volume Amazon Resource Name (ARN) with the longer volume ID format looks like the following: arn:aws:storagegateway:us-west-2:111122223333:gateway/sgw-12A3456B/volume/vol-1122AABBCCDDEEFFG. A snapshot ID with the longer ID format looks like the following: snap-78e226633445566ee. For more information, see Announcement: Heads-up – Longer Storage Gateway volume and snapshot IDs coming in 2016.

UpdateAdminClient

azure.com
Update run operation endpoints and objects.

AWS Application Cost Profiler

This reference provides descriptions of the AWS Application Cost Profiler API. The AWS Application Cost Profiler API provides programmatic access to view, create, update, and delete application cost report definitions, as well as to import your usage data into the Application Cost Profiler service. For more information about using this service, see the AWS Application Cost Profiler User Guide.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on entities like API, Product, and Subscription associated with your Azure API Management deployment.