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AWSMarketplace Metering

amazonaws.com

Version: 2016-01-14


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Description

AWS Marketplace Metering Service This reference provides descriptions of the low-level AWS Marketplace Metering Service API. AWS Marketplace sellers can use this API to submit usage data for custom usage dimensions. For information on the permissions you need to use this API, see AWS Marketing metering and entitlement API permissions in the AWS Marketplace Seller Guide. Submitting Metering Records MeterUsage - Submits the metering record for a Marketplace product. MeterUsage is called from an EC2 instance or a container running on EKS or ECS. BatchMeterUsage - Submits the metering record for a set of customers. BatchMeterUsage is called from a software-as-a-service (SaaS) application. Accepting New Customers ResolveCustomer - Called by a SaaS application during the registration process. When a buyer visits your website during the registration process, the buyer submits a Registration Token through the browser. The Registration Token is resolved through this API to obtain a CustomerIdentifier and Product Code. Entitlement and Metering for Paid Container Products Paid container software products sold through AWS Marketplace must integrate with the AWS Marketplace Metering Service and call the RegisterUsage operation for software entitlement and metering. Free and BYOL products for Amazon ECS or Amazon EKS aren't required to call RegisterUsage, but you can do so if you want to receive usage data in your seller reports. For more information on using the RegisterUsage operation, see Container-Based Products. BatchMeterUsage API calls are captured by AWS CloudTrail. You can use Cloudtrail to verify that the SaaS metering records that you sent are accurate by searching for records with the eventName of BatchMeterUsage. You can also use CloudTrail to audit records over time. For more information, see the AWS CloudTrail User Guide .

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

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AWS Lake Formation Defines the public endpoint for the AWS Lake Formation service.

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Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

AWS Key Management Service

Key Management Service Key Management Service (KMS) is an encryption and key management web service. This guide describes the KMS operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about KMS, see the Key Management Service Developer Guide . KMS is replacing the term customer master key (CMK) with KMS key and KMS key. The concept has not changed. To prevent breaking changes, KMS is keeping some variations of this term. Amazon Web Services provides SDKs that consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .Net, macOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to KMS and other Amazon Web Services services. For example, the SDKs take care of tasks such as signing requests (see below), managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services. We recommend that you use the Amazon Web Services SDKs to make programmatic API calls to KMS. Clients must support TLS (Transport Layer Security) 1.0. We recommend TLS 1.2. Clients must also support cipher suites with Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) such as Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (DHE) or Elliptic Curve Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (ECDHE). Most modern systems such as Java 7 and later support these modes. Signing Requests Requests must be signed by using an access key ID and a secret access key. We strongly recommend that you do not use your Amazon Web Services account (root) access key ID and secret key for everyday work with KMS. Instead, use the access key ID and secret access key for an IAM user. You can also use the Amazon Web Services Security Token Service to generate temporary security credentials that you can use to sign requests. All KMS operations require Signature Version 4. Logging API Requests KMS supports CloudTrail, a service that logs Amazon Web Services API calls and related events for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers them to an Amazon S3 bucket that you specify. By using the information collected by CloudTrail, you can determine what requests were made to KMS, who made the request, when it was made, and so on. To learn more about CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the CloudTrail User Guide. Additional Resources For more information about credentials and request signing, see the following: Amazon Web Services Security Credentials - This topic provides general information about the types of credentials used to access Amazon Web Services. Temporary Security Credentials - This section of the IAM User Guide describes how to create and use temporary security credentials. Signature Version 4 Signing Process - This set of topics walks you through the process of signing a request using an access key ID and a secret access key. Commonly Used API Operations Of the API operations discussed in this guide, the following will prove the most useful for most applications. You will likely perform operations other than these, such as creating keys and assigning policies, by using the console. Encrypt Decrypt GenerateDataKey GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

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Amazon SageMaker Feature Store Runtime

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Amazon CodeGuru Reviewer

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AWS Application Cost Profiler

This reference provides descriptions of the AWS Application Cost Profiler API. The AWS Application Cost Profiler API provides programmatic access to view, create, update, and delete application cost report definitions, as well as to import your usage data into the Application Cost Profiler service. For more information about using this service, see the AWS Application Cost Profiler User Guide.

AWS Certificate Manager Private Certificate Authority

This is the ACM Private CA API Reference. It provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types involved in creating and managing private certificate authorities (CA) for your organization. The documentation for each action shows the Query API request parameters and the XML response. Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that's tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. Each ACM Private CA API operation has a quota that determines the number of times the operation can be called per second. ACM Private CA throttles API requests at different rates depending on the operation. Throttling means that ACM Private CA rejects an otherwise valid request because the request exceeds the operation's quota for the number of requests per second. When a request is throttled, ACM Private CA returns a ThrottlingException error. ACM Private CA does not guarantee a minimum request rate for APIs. To see an up-to-date list of your ACM Private CA quotas, or to request a quota increase, log into your AWS account and visit the Service Quotas console.

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