Mock sample for your project: ApiManagementClient API

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ApiManagementClient

azure.com

Version: 2019-12-01-preview


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Speed up your application development by using "ApiManagementClient API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and allow you to stop relying on an external API to get the job done. No more API keys to provision, accesses to configure or unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

Use these REST APIs for performing operations on Identity Provider entity associated with your Azure API Management deployment. Setting up an external Identity Provider for authentication can help you manage the developer portal logins using the OAuth2 flow.

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