Mock sample for your project: BatchService API

Integrate with "BatchService API" from azure.com in no time with Mockoon's ready to use mock sample

BatchService

azure.com

Version: 2019-08-01.10.0


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "BatchService API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and allow you to stop relying on an external API to get the job done. No more API keys to provision, accesses to configure or unplanned downtime, just work.
Enhance your development infrastructure by mocking third party APIs during integrating testing.

Description

A client for issuing REST requests to the Azure Batch service.

Other APIs by azure.com

Domain Services Resource Provider

azure.com
The AAD Domain Services API.

VM Insights Onboarding

azure.com
API to manage VM Insights Onboarding

AutomationManagement

azure.com

DataLakeStoreFileSystemManagementClient

azure.com
Creates an Azure Data Lake Store filesystem client.

StorageManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Storage Management Client.

SharedImageGalleryServiceClient

azure.com
Shared Image Gallery Service Client.

LUIS Authoring Client

azure.com

EventGridManagementClient

azure.com
Azure EventGrid Management Client

Azure Alerts Management Service Resource Provider

azure.com
APIs for Azure Smart Detector Alert Rules CRUD operations.

HybridDataManagementClient

azure.com

LUIS Programmatic

azure.com

ApplicationInsightsManagementClient

azure.com
Azure Application Insights client for work item configurations for a component.

Other APIs in the same category

StorageImportExport

azure.com
The Storage Import/Export Resource Provider API.

AWS Well-Architected Tool

AWS Well-Architected Tool This is the AWS Well-Architected Tool API Reference. The AWS Well-Architected Tool API provides programmatic access to the AWS Well-Architected Tool in the AWS Management Console. For information about the AWS Well-Architected Tool, see the AWS Well-Architected Tool User Guide.

AWS Service Catalog

AWS Service Catalog AWS Service Catalog enables organizations to create and manage catalogs of IT services that are approved for AWS. To get the most out of this documentation, you should be familiar with the terminology discussed in AWS Service Catalog Concepts.

FinSpace Public API

The FinSpace APIs let you take actions inside the FinSpace environment.

Application Auto Scaling

With Application Auto Scaling, you can configure automatic scaling for the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 fleets Amazon Aurora Replicas Amazon Comprehend document classification and entity recognizer endpoints Amazon DynamoDB tables and global secondary indexes throughput capacity Amazon ECS services Amazon ElastiCache for Redis clusters (replication groups) Amazon EMR clusters Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra) tables Lambda function provisioned concurrency Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka broker storage Amazon SageMaker endpoint variants Spot Fleet (Amazon EC2) requests Custom resources provided by your own applications or services API Summary The Application Auto Scaling service API includes three key sets of actions: Register and manage scalable targets - Register Amazon Web Services or custom resources as scalable targets (a resource that Application Auto Scaling can scale), set minimum and maximum capacity limits, and retrieve information on existing scalable targets. Configure and manage automatic scaling - Define scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources in response to CloudWatch alarms, schedule one-time or recurring scaling actions, and retrieve your recent scaling activity history. Suspend and resume scaling - Temporarily suspend and later resume automatic scaling by calling the RegisterScalableTarget API action for any Application Auto Scaling scalable target. You can suspend and resume (individually or in combination) scale-out activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, scale-in activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, and scheduled scaling. To learn more about Application Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for Application Auto Scaling actions, see the Application Auto Scaling User Guide.

AWS Batch

Batch Using Batch, you can run batch computing workloads on the Cloud. Batch computing is a common means for developers, scientists, and engineers to access large amounts of compute resources. Batch uses the advantages of this computing workload to remove the undifferentiated heavy lifting of configuring and managing required infrastructure. At the same time, it also adopts a familiar batch computing software approach. Given these advantages, Batch can help you to efficiently provision resources in response to jobs submitted, thus effectively helping you to eliminate capacity constraints, reduce compute costs, and deliver your results more quickly. As a fully managed service, Batch can run batch computing workloads of any scale. Batch automatically provisions compute resources and optimizes workload distribution based on the quantity and scale of your specific workloads. With Batch, there's no need to install or manage batch computing software. This means that you can focus your time and energy on analyzing results and solving your specific problems.

AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

Amazon Chime

The Amazon Chime API (application programming interface) is designed for developers to perform key tasks, such as creating and managing Amazon Chime accounts, users, and Voice Connectors. This guide provides detailed information about the Amazon Chime API, including operations, types, inputs and outputs, and error codes. It also includes some server-side API actions to use with the Amazon Chime SDK. For more information about the Amazon Chime SDK, see Using the Amazon Chime SDK in the Amazon Chime Developer Guide. You can use an AWS SDK, the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or the REST API to make API calls. We recommend using an AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Each API operation includes links to information about using it with a language-specific AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Using an AWS SDK You don't need to write code to calculate a signature for request authentication. The SDK clients authenticate your requests by using access keys that you provide. For more information about AWS SDKs, see the AWS Developer Center. Using the AWS CLI Use your access keys with the AWS CLI to make API calls. For information about setting up the AWS CLI, see Installing the AWS Command Line Interface in the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide. For a list of available Amazon Chime commands, see the Amazon Chime commands in the AWS CLI Command Reference. Using REST APIs If you use REST to make API calls, you must authenticate your request by providing a signature. Amazon Chime supports signature version 4. For more information, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process in the Amazon Web Services General Reference. When making REST API calls, use the service name chime and REST endpoint https://service.chime.aws.amazon.com. Administrative permissions are controlled using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM). For more information, see Identity and Access Management for Amazon Chime in the Amazon Chime Administration Guide.

Platform API

The REST API specification for Ably.

Amazon CloudFront

Amazon CloudFront This is the Amazon CloudFront API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about CloudFront API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about CloudFront features, see the Amazon CloudFront Developer Guide.

Amazon CloudSearch Domain

You use the AmazonCloudSearch2013 API to upload documents to a search domain and search those documents. The endpoints for submitting UploadDocuments, Search, and Suggest requests are domain-specific. To get the endpoints for your domain, use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service DescribeDomains action. The domain endpoints are also displayed on the domain dashboard in the Amazon CloudSearch console. You submit suggest requests to the search endpoint. For more information, see the Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide.

AWS Auto Scaling Plans

AWS Auto Scaling Use AWS Auto Scaling to create scaling plans for your applications to automatically scale your scalable AWS resources. API Summary You can use the AWS Auto Scaling service API to accomplish the following tasks: Create and manage scaling plans Define target tracking scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources based on utilization Scale Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups using predictive scaling and dynamic scaling to scale your Amazon EC2 capacity faster Set minimum and maximum capacity limits Retrieve information on existing scaling plans Access current forecast data and historical forecast data for up to 56 days previous To learn more about AWS Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for AWS Auto Scaling actions, see the AWS Auto Scaling User Guide.