Mock sample for your project: Amazon Timestream Query API

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Amazon Timestream Query

amazonaws.com

Version: 2018-11-01


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "Amazon Timestream Query API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs: no more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, etc.

Description

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

IoT IoT provides secure, bi-directional communication between Internet-connected devices (such as sensors, actuators, embedded devices, or smart appliances) and the Amazon Web Services cloud. You can discover your custom IoT-Data endpoint to communicate with, configure rules for data processing and integration with other services, organize resources associated with each device (Registry), configure logging, and create and manage policies and credentials to authenticate devices. The service endpoints that expose this API are listed in Amazon Web Services IoT Core Endpoints and Quotas. You must use the endpoint for the region that has the resources you want to access. The service name used by Amazon Web Services Signature Version 4 to sign the request is: execute-api. For more information about how IoT works, see the Developer Guide. For information about how to use the credentials provider for IoT, see Authorizing Direct Calls to Amazon Web Services Services.

AWS Direct Connect

Direct Connect links your internal network to an Direct Connect location over a standard Ethernet fiber-optic cable. One end of the cable is connected to your router, the other to an Direct Connect router. With this connection in place, you can create virtual interfaces directly to the Cloud (for example, to Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3) and to Amazon VPC, bypassing Internet service providers in your network path. A connection provides access to all Regions except the China (Beijing) and (China) Ningxia Regions. Amazon Web Services resources in the China Regions can only be accessed through locations associated with those Regions.

AWS Lambda

Lambda Overview This is the Lambda API Reference. The Lambda Developer Guide provides additional information. For the service overview, see What is Lambda, and for information about how the service works, see Lambda: How it Works in the Lambda Developer Guide.

AWS Fault Injection Simulator

AWS Fault Injection Simulator is a managed service that enables you to perform fault injection experiments on your AWS workloads. For more information, see the AWS Fault Injection Simulator User Guide.

Amazon Kinesis Analytics

Amazon Kinesis Analytics Overview This documentation is for version 1 of the Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics API, which only supports SQL applications. Version 2 of the API supports SQL and Java applications. For more information about version 2, see Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics API V2 Documentation. This is the Amazon Kinesis Analytics v1 API Reference. The Amazon Kinesis Analytics Developer Guide provides additional information.

AWS Elemental MediaPackage

AWS Elemental MediaPackage

Amazon Simple Email Service

Amazon Simple Email Service This document contains reference information for the Amazon Simple Email Service (Amazon SES) API, version 2010-12-01. This document is best used in conjunction with the Amazon SES Developer Guide. For a list of Amazon SES endpoints to use in service requests, see Regions and Amazon SES in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

Amazon Relational Database Service

Amazon Relational Database Service Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud. It provides cost-efficient, resizeable capacity for an industry-standard relational database and manages common database administration tasks, freeing up developers to focus on what makes their applications and businesses unique. Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, or Amazon Aurora database server. These capabilities mean that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases work with Amazon RDS without modification. Amazon RDS automatically backs up your database and maintains the database software that powers your DB instance. Amazon RDS is flexible: you can scale your DB instance's compute resources and storage capacity to meet your application's demand. As with all Amazon Web Services, there are no up-front investments, and you pay only for the resources you use. This interface reference for Amazon RDS contains documentation for a programming or command line interface you can use to manage Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS is asynchronous, which means that some interfaces might require techniques such as polling or callback functions to determine when a command has been applied. In this reference, the parameter descriptions indicate whether a command is applied immediately, on the next instance reboot, or during the maintenance window. The reference structure is as follows, and we list following some related topics from the user guide. Amazon RDS API Reference For the alphabetical list of API actions, see API Actions. For the alphabetical list of data types, see Data Types. For a list of common query parameters, see Common Parameters. For descriptions of the error codes, see Common Errors. Amazon RDS User Guide For a summary of the Amazon RDS interfaces, see Available RDS Interfaces. For more information about how to use the Query API, see Using the Query API.

FinSpace User Environment Management service

The FinSpace management service provides the APIs for managing the FinSpace environments.

Amazon Kinesis

Amazon Kinesis Data Streams Service API Reference Amazon Kinesis Data Streams is a managed service that scales elastically for real-time processing of streaming big data.

Application Migration Service

The Application Migration Service service.

FinSpace Public API

The FinSpace APIs let you take actions inside the FinSpace environment.

Other APIs in the same category

AuthorizationManagementClient

azure.com
Role based access control provides you a way to apply granular level policy administration down to individual resources or resource groups. These operations enable you to manage role definitions and role assignments. A role definition describes the set of actions that can be performed on resources. A role assignment grants access to Azure Active Directory users.

Linode API

Introduction
The Linode API provides the ability to programmatically manage the full
range of Linode products and services.
This reference is designed to assist application developers and system
administrators. Each endpoint includes descriptions, request syntax, and
examples using standard HTTP requests. Response data is returned in JSON
format.
This document was generated from our OpenAPI Specification. See the
OpenAPI website for more information.
Download the Linode OpenAPI Specification.
Changelog
View our Changelog to see release
notes on all changes made to our API.
Access and Authentication
Some endpoints are publicly accessible without requiring authentication.
All endpoints affecting your Account, however, require either a Personal
Access Token or OAuth authentication (when using third-party
applications).
Personal Access Token
The easiest way to access the API is with a Personal Access Token (PAT)
generated from the
Linode Cloud Manager or
the Create Personal Access Token endpoint.
All scopes for the OAuth security model (defined below) apply to this
security model as well.
Authentication
| Security Scheme Type: | HTTP |
|-----------------------|------|
| HTTP Authorization Scheme | bearer |
OAuth
If you only need to access the Linode API for personal use,
we recommend that you create a personal access token.
If you're designing an application that can authenticate with an arbitrary Linode user, then
you should use the OAuth 2.0 workflows presented in this section.
For a more detailed example of an OAuth 2.0 implementation, see our guide on How to Create an OAuth App with the Linode Python API Library.
Before you implement OAuth in your application, you first need to create an OAuth client. You can do this with the Linode API or via the Cloud Manager:
When creating the client, you'll supply a label and a redirect_uri (referred to as the Callback URL in the Cloud Manager).
The response from this endpoint will give you a client_id and a secret.
Clients can be public or private, and are private by default. You can choose to make the client public when it is created.
A private client is used with applications which can securely store the client secret (that is, the secret returned to you when you first created the client). For example, an application running on a secured server that only the developer has access to would use a private OAuth client. This is also called a confidential client in some OAuth documentation.
A public client is used with applications where the client secret is not guaranteed to be secure. For example, a native app running on a user's computer may not be able to keep the client secret safe, as a user could potentially inspect the source of the application. So, native apps or apps that run in a user's browser should use a public client.
Public and private clients follow different workflows, as described below.
OAuth Workflow
The OAuth workflow is a series of exchanges between your third-party app and Linode. The workflow is used
to authenticate a user before an application can start making API calls on the user's behalf.
Notes:
With respect to the diagram in section 1.2 of RFC 6749, login.linode.com (referred to in this section as the login server)
is the Resource Owner and the Authorization Server; api.linode.com (referred to here as the api server) is the Resource Server.
The OAuth spec refers to the private and public workflows listed below as the authorization code flow and implicit flow.
| PRIVATE WORKFLOW | PUBLIC WORKFLOW |
|------------------|------------------|
| 1. The user visits the application's website and is directed to login with Linode. | 1. The user visits the application's website and is directed to login with Linode. |
| 2. Your application then redirects the user to Linode's login server with the client application's clientid and requested OAuth scope, which should appear in the URL of the login page. | 2. Your application then redirects the user to Linode's login server with the client application's clientid and requested OAuth scope, which should appear in the URL of the login page. |
| 3. The user logs into the login server with their username and password. | 3. The user logs into the login server with their username and password. |
| 4. The login server redirects the user to the specificed redirect URL with a temporary authorization code (exchange code) in the URL. | 4. The login server redirects the user back to your application with an OAuth accesstoken embedded in the redirect URL's hash. This is temporary and expires in two hours. No refreshtoken is issued. Therefore, once the access_token expires, a new one will need to be issued by having the user log in again. |
| 5. The application issues a POST request (see below) to the login server with the exchange code, clientid, and the client application's clientsecret. | |
| 6. The login server responds to the client application with a new OAuth accesstoken and refreshtoken. The access_token is set to expire in two hours. | |
| 7. The refreshtoken can be used by contacting the login server with the clientid, clientsecret, granttype, and refreshtoken to get a new OAuth accesstoken and refreshtoken. The new accesstoken is good for another two hours, and the new refresh_token, can be used to extend the session again by this same method. | |
OAuth Private Workflow - Additional Details
The following information expands on steps 5 through 7 of the private workflow:
Once the user has logged into Linode and you have received an exchange code,
you will need to trade that exchange code for an accesstoken and refreshtoken. You
do this by making an HTTP POST request to the following address:
Rate Limiting
With the Linode API, you can make up to 1,600 general API requests every two minutes per user as
determined by IP adddress or by OAuth token. Additionally, there are endpoint specfic limits defined below.
Note: There may be rate limiting applied at other levels outside of the API, for example, at the load balancer.
/stats endpoints have their own dedicated limits of 100 requests per minute per user.
These endpoints are:
View Linode Statistics
View Linode Statistics (year/month)
View NodeBalancer Statistics
List Managed Stats
Object Storage endpoints have a dedicated limit of 750 requests per second per user.
The Object Storage endpoints are:
Object Storage Endpoints
Opening Support Tickets has a dedicated limit of 2 requests per minute per user.
That endpoint is:
Open Support Ticket
Accepting Service Transfers has a dedicated limit of 2 requests per minute per user.
That endpoint is:
Service Transfer Accept
CLI (Command Line Interface)
The Linode CLI allows you to easily
work with the API using intuitive and simple syntax. It requires a
Personal Access Token
for authentication, and gives you access to all of the features and functionality
of the Linode API that are documented here with CLI examples.
Endpoints that do not have CLI examples are currently unavailable through the CLI, but
can be accessed via other methods such as Shell commands and other third-party applications.

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
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SqlManagementClient

azure.com
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SqlManagementClient

azure.com
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SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
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SqlManagementClient

azure.com
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NetworkManagementClient

azure.com
The Microsoft Azure Network management API provides a RESTful set of web services that interact with Microsoft Azure Networks service to manage your network resources. The API has entities that capture the relationship between an end user and the Microsoft Azure Networks service.

MonitorManagementClient

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StorageManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure Storage Management API.