Mock sample for your project: AWS MediaConnect API

Integrate with "AWS MediaConnect API" from amazonaws.com in no time with Mockoon's ready to use mock sample

AWS MediaConnect

amazonaws.com

Version: 2018-11-14


Use this API in your project

Start working with "AWS MediaConnect API" right away by using this ready-to-use mock sample. API mocking can greatly speed up your application development by removing all the tedious tasks or issues: API key provisioning, account creation, unplanned downtime, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

API for AWS Elemental MediaConnect

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Amazon Simple Workflow Service

Amazon Simple Workflow Service The Amazon Simple Workflow Service (Amazon SWF) makes it easy to build applications that use Amazon's cloud to coordinate work across distributed components. In Amazon SWF, a task represents a logical unit of work that is performed by a component of your workflow. Coordinating tasks in a workflow involves managing intertask dependencies, scheduling, and concurrency in accordance with the logical flow of the application. Amazon SWF gives you full control over implementing tasks and coordinating them without worrying about underlying complexities such as tracking their progress and maintaining their state. This documentation serves as reference only. For a broader overview of the Amazon SWF programming model, see the Amazon SWF Developer Guide .

AWS CodeStar

AWS CodeStar This is the API reference for AWS CodeStar. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeStar API to work with: Projects and their resources, by calling the following: DeleteProject, which deletes a project. DescribeProject, which lists the attributes of a project. ListProjects, which lists all projects associated with your AWS account. ListResources, which lists the resources associated with a project. ListTagsForProject, which lists the tags associated with a project. TagProject, which adds tags to a project. UntagProject, which removes tags from a project. UpdateProject, which updates the attributes of a project. Teams and team members, by calling the following: AssociateTeamMember, which adds an IAM user to the team for a project. DisassociateTeamMember, which removes an IAM user from the team for a project. ListTeamMembers, which lists all the IAM users in the team for a project, including their roles and attributes. UpdateTeamMember, which updates a team member's attributes in a project. Users, by calling the following: CreateUserProfile, which creates a user profile that contains data associated with the user across all projects. DeleteUserProfile, which deletes all user profile information across all projects. DescribeUserProfile, which describes the profile of a user. ListUserProfiles, which lists all user profiles. UpdateUserProfile, which updates the profile for a user.

AWS Certificate Manager

Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager You can use Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager (ACM) to manage SSL/TLS certificates for your Amazon Web Services-based websites and applications. For more information about using ACM, see the Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager User Guide.

AmazonApiGatewayV2

Amazon API Gateway V2

AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

AWS Device Farm

Welcome to the AWS Device Farm API documentation, which contains APIs for: Testing on desktop browsers Device Farm makes it possible for you to test your web applications on desktop browsers using Selenium. The APIs for desktop browser testing contain TestGrid in their names. For more information, see Testing Web Applications on Selenium with Device Farm. Testing on real mobile devices Device Farm makes it possible for you to test apps on physical phones, tablets, and other devices in the cloud. For more information, see the Device Farm Developer Guide.

Amazon Comprehend

Amazon Comprehend is an AWS service for gaining insight into the content of documents. Use these actions to determine the topics contained in your documents, the topics they discuss, the predominant sentiment expressed in them, the predominant language used, and more.

AWS Cost and Usage Report Service

The AWS Cost and Usage Report API enables you to programmatically create, query, and delete AWS Cost and Usage report definitions. AWS Cost and Usage reports track the monthly AWS costs and usage associated with your AWS account. The report contains line items for each unique combination of AWS product, usage type, and operation that your AWS account uses. You can configure the AWS Cost and Usage report to show only the data that you want, using the AWS Cost and Usage API. Service Endpoint The AWS Cost and Usage Report API provides the following endpoint: cur.us-east-1.amazonaws.com

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

AWS CodeStar connections

AWS CodeStar Connections This AWS CodeStar Connections API Reference provides descriptions and usage examples of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar Connections API. You can use the connections API to work with connections and installations. Connections are configurations that you use to connect AWS resources to external code repositories. Each connection is a resource that can be given to services such as CodePipeline to connect to a third-party repository such as Bitbucket. For example, you can add the connection in CodePipeline so that it triggers your pipeline when a code change is made to your third-party code repository. Each connection is named and associated with a unique ARN that is used to reference the connection. When you create a connection, the console initiates a third-party connection handshake. Installations are the apps that are used to conduct this handshake. For example, the installation for the Bitbucket provider type is the Bitbucket app. When you create a connection, you can choose an existing installation or create one. When you want to create a connection to an installed provider type such as GitHub Enterprise Server, you create a host for your connections. You can work with connections by calling: CreateConnection, which creates a uniquely named connection that can be referenced by services such as CodePipeline. DeleteConnection, which deletes the specified connection. GetConnection, which returns information about the connection, including the connection status. ListConnections, which lists the connections associated with your account. You can work with hosts by calling: CreateHost, which creates a host that represents the infrastructure where your provider is installed. DeleteHost, which deletes the specified host. GetHost, which returns information about the host, including the setup status. ListHosts, which lists the hosts associated with your account. You can work with tags in AWS CodeStar Connections by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeStar Connections. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeStar Connections. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeStar Connections. For information about how to use AWS CodeStar Connections, see the Developer Tools User Guide.

AWS Batch

Batch Using Batch, you can run batch computing workloads on the Cloud. Batch computing is a common means for developers, scientists, and engineers to access large amounts of compute resources. Batch uses the advantages of this computing workload to remove the undifferentiated heavy lifting of configuring and managing required infrastructure. At the same time, it also adopts a familiar batch computing software approach. Given these advantages, Batch can help you to efficiently provision resources in response to jobs submitted, thus effectively helping you to eliminate capacity constraints, reduce compute costs, and deliver your results more quickly. As a fully managed service, Batch can run batch computing workloads of any scale. Batch automatically provisions compute resources and optimizes workload distribution based on the quantity and scale of your specific workloads. With Batch, there's no need to install or manage batch computing software. This means that you can focus your time and energy on analyzing results and solving your specific problems.

Amazon Connect Contact Lens

Contact Lens for Amazon Connect enables you to analyze conversations between customer and agents, by using speech transcription, natural language processing, and intelligent search capabilities. It performs sentiment analysis, detects issues, and enables you to automatically categorize contacts. Contact Lens for Amazon Connect provides both real-time and post-call analytics of customer-agent conversations. For more information, see Analyze conversations using Contact Lens in the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide.

Other APIs in the same category

Amazon Textract

Amazon Textract detects and analyzes text in documents and converts it into machine-readable text. This is the API reference documentation for Amazon Textract.

Amazon Data Lifecycle Manager

Amazon Data Lifecycle Manager With Amazon Data Lifecycle Manager, you can manage the lifecycle of your Amazon Web Services resources. You create lifecycle policies, which are used to automate operations on the specified resources. Amazon DLM supports Amazon EBS volumes and snapshots. For information about using Amazon DLM with Amazon EBS, see Automating the Amazon EBS Snapshot Lifecycle in the Amazon EC2 User Guide.

AWSMarketplace Metering

AWS Marketplace Metering Service This reference provides descriptions of the low-level AWS Marketplace Metering Service API. AWS Marketplace sellers can use this API to submit usage data for custom usage dimensions. For information on the permissions you need to use this API, see AWS Marketing metering and entitlement API permissions in the AWS Marketplace Seller Guide. Submitting Metering Records MeterUsage - Submits the metering record for a Marketplace product. MeterUsage is called from an EC2 instance or a container running on EKS or ECS. BatchMeterUsage - Submits the metering record for a set of customers. BatchMeterUsage is called from a software-as-a-service (SaaS) application. Accepting New Customers ResolveCustomer - Called by a SaaS application during the registration process. When a buyer visits your website during the registration process, the buyer submits a Registration Token through the browser. The Registration Token is resolved through this API to obtain a CustomerIdentifier and Product Code. Entitlement and Metering for Paid Container Products Paid container software products sold through AWS Marketplace must integrate with the AWS Marketplace Metering Service and call the RegisterUsage operation for software entitlement and metering. Free and BYOL products for Amazon ECS or Amazon EKS aren't required to call RegisterUsage, but you can do so if you want to receive usage data in your seller reports. For more information on using the RegisterUsage operation, see Container-Based Products. BatchMeterUsage API calls are captured by AWS CloudTrail. You can use Cloudtrail to verify that the SaaS metering records that you sent are accurate by searching for records with the eventName of BatchMeterUsage. You can also use CloudTrail to audit records over time. For more information, see the AWS CloudTrail User Guide .

AWS License Manager

AWS License Manager AWS License Manager makes it easier to manage licenses from software vendors across multiple AWS accounts and on-premises servers.

ADHybridHealthService

azure.com
REST APIs for Azure Active Directory Connect Health

AWS Migration Hub

The AWS Migration Hub API methods help to obtain server and application migration status and integrate your resource-specific migration tool by providing a programmatic interface to Migration Hub. Remember that you must set your AWS Migration Hub home region before you call any of these APIs, or a HomeRegionNotSetException error will be returned. Also, you must make the API calls while in your home region.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on Certificate entity in your Azure API Management deployment. Certificates can be used to setup mutual authentication with your Backend in API Management. For more information refer to How to secure backend using Mutual Auth Certificate.

AWS WAFV2

WAF This is the latest version of the WAF API, released in November, 2019. The names of the entities that you use to access this API, like endpoints and namespaces, all have the versioning information added, like "V2" or "v2", to distinguish from the prior version. We recommend migrating your resources to this version, because it has a number of significant improvements. If you used WAF prior to this release, you can't use this WAFV2 API to access any WAF resources that you created before. You can access your old rules, web ACLs, and other WAF resources only through the WAF Classic APIs. The WAF Classic APIs have retained the prior names, endpoints, and namespaces. For information, including how to migrate your WAF resources to this version, see the WAF Developer Guide. WAF is a web application firewall that lets you monitor the HTTP and HTTPS requests that are forwarded to Amazon CloudFront, an Amazon API Gateway REST API, an Application Load Balancer, or an AppSync GraphQL API. WAF also lets you control access to your content. Based on conditions that you specify, such as the IP addresses that requests originate from or the values of query strings, the Amazon API Gateway REST API, CloudFront distribution, the Application Load Balancer, or the AppSync GraphQL API responds to requests either with the requested content or with an HTTP 403 status code (Forbidden). You also can configure CloudFront to return a custom error page when a request is blocked. This API guide is for developers who need detailed information about WAF API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about WAF features and an overview of how to use WAF, see the WAF Developer Guide. You can make calls using the endpoints listed in WAF endpoints and quotas. For regional applications, you can use any of the endpoints in the list. A regional application can be an Application Load Balancer (ALB), an Amazon API Gateway REST API, or an AppSync GraphQL API. For Amazon CloudFront applications, you must use the API endpoint listed for US East (N. Virginia): us-east-1. Alternatively, you can use one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs to access an API that's tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see Amazon Web Services SDKs. We currently provide two versions of the WAF API: this API and the prior versions, the classic WAF APIs. This new API provides the same functionality as the older versions, with the following major improvements: You use one API for both global and regional applications. Where you need to distinguish the scope, you specify a Scope parameter and set it to CLOUDFRONT or REGIONAL. You can define a web ACL or rule group with a single call, and update it with a single call. You define all rule specifications in JSON format, and pass them to your rule group or web ACL calls. The limits WAF places on the use of rules more closely reflects the cost of running each type of rule. Rule groups include capacity settings, so you know the maximum cost of a rule group when you use it.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for managing OAuth2 servers configuration in your Azure API Management deployment. OAuth 2.0 can be used to authorize developer accounts for Azure API Management. For more information refer to How to OAuth2.

Amazon CloudWatch

Amazon CloudWatch monitors your Amazon Web Services (Amazon Web Services) resources and the applications you run on Amazon Web Services in real time. You can use CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, which are the variables you want to measure for your resources and applications. CloudWatch alarms send notifications or automatically change the resources you are monitoring based on rules that you define. For example, you can monitor the CPU usage and disk reads and writes of your Amazon EC2 instances. Then, use this data to determine whether you should launch additional instances to handle increased load. You can also use this data to stop under-used instances to save money. In addition to monitoring the built-in metrics that come with Amazon Web Services, you can monitor your own custom metrics. With CloudWatch, you gain system-wide visibility into resource utilization, application performance, and operational health.

Elastic Load Balancing

Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer can distribute incoming traffic across your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered instances and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy instances. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer and a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the instances. Elastic Load Balancing supports three types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. You can select a load balancer based on your application needs. For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. This reference covers the 2012-06-01 API, which supports Classic Load Balancers. The 2015-12-01 API supports Application Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers. To get started, create a load balancer with one or more listeners using CreateLoadBalancer. Register your instances with the load balancer using RegisterInstancesWithLoadBalancer. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds with a 200 OK response code.

AWS Snow Device Management

Amazon Web Services Snow Device Management documentation.