Mock sample for your project: AWS X-Ray API

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AWS X-Ray

amazonaws.com

Version: 2016-04-12


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Speed up your application development by using "AWS X-Ray API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

Amazon Web Services X-Ray provides APIs for managing debug traces and retrieving service maps and other data created by processing those traces.

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