Mock sample for your project: AWS Network Manager API

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AWS Network Manager

amazonaws.com

Version: 2019-07-05


Use this API in your project

Start working with "AWS Network Manager API" right away by using this ready-to-use mock sample. API mocking can greatly speed up your application development by removing all the tedious tasks or issues: API key provisioning, account creation, unplanned downtime, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

Transit Gateway Network Manager (Network Manager) enables you to create a global network, in which you can monitor your AWS and on-premises networks that are built around transit gateways. The Network Manager APIs are supported in the US West (Oregon) Region only. You must specify the us-west-2 Region in all requests made to Network Manager.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Application Migration Service

The Application Migration Service service.

Amazon CloudWatch

Amazon CloudWatch monitors your Amazon Web Services (Amazon Web Services) resources and the applications you run on Amazon Web Services in real time. You can use CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, which are the variables you want to measure for your resources and applications. CloudWatch alarms send notifications or automatically change the resources you are monitoring based on rules that you define. For example, you can monitor the CPU usage and disk reads and writes of your Amazon EC2 instances. Then, use this data to determine whether you should launch additional instances to handle increased load. You can also use this data to stop under-used instances to save money. In addition to monitoring the built-in metrics that come with Amazon Web Services, you can monitor your own custom metrics. With CloudWatch, you gain system-wide visibility into resource utilization, application performance, and operational health.

AWS Resource Groups

AWS Resource Groups AWS Resource Groups lets you organize AWS resources such as Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon Relational Database Service databases, and Amazon S3 buckets into groups using criteria that you define as tags. A resource group is a collection of resources that match the resource types specified in a query, and share one or more tags or portions of tags. You can create a group of resources based on their roles in your cloud infrastructure, lifecycle stages, regions, application layers, or virtually any criteria. Resource Groups enable you to automate management tasks, such as those in AWS Systems Manager Automation documents, on tag-related resources in AWS Systems Manager. Groups of tagged resources also let you quickly view a custom console in AWS Systems Manager that shows AWS Config compliance and other monitoring data about member resources. To create a resource group, build a resource query, and specify tags that identify the criteria that members of the group have in common. Tags are key-value pairs. For more information about Resource Groups, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide. AWS Resource Groups uses a REST-compliant API that you can use to perform the following types of operations. Create, Read, Update, and Delete (CRUD) operations on resource groups and resource query entities Applying, editing, and removing tags from resource groups Resolving resource group member ARNs so they can be returned as search results Getting data about resources that are members of a group Searching AWS resources based on a resource query

Amazon Simple Storage Service

Amazon Timestream Query

Amazon CloudWatch Logs

You can use Amazon CloudWatch Logs to monitor, store, and access your log files from EC2 instances, CloudTrail, and other sources. You can then retrieve the associated log data from CloudWatch Logs using the CloudWatch console, CloudWatch Logs commands in the Amazon Web Services CLI, CloudWatch Logs API, or CloudWatch Logs SDK. You can use CloudWatch Logs to: Monitor logs from EC2 instances in real-time : You can use CloudWatch Logs to monitor applications and systems using log data. For example, CloudWatch Logs can track the number of errors that occur in your application logs and send you a notification whenever the rate of errors exceeds a threshold that you specify. CloudWatch Logs uses your log data for monitoring so no code changes are required. For example, you can monitor application logs for specific literal terms (such as "NullReferenceException") or count the number of occurrences of a literal term at a particular position in log data (such as "404" status codes in an Apache access log). When the term you are searching for is found, CloudWatch Logs reports the data to a CloudWatch metric that you specify. Monitor CloudTrail logged events : You can create alarms in CloudWatch and receive notifications of particular API activity as captured by CloudTrail. You can use the notification to perform troubleshooting. Archive log data : You can use CloudWatch Logs to store your log data in highly durable storage. You can change the log retention setting so that any log events older than this setting are automatically deleted. The CloudWatch Logs agent makes it easy to quickly send both rotated and non-rotated log data off of a host and into the log service. You can then access the raw log data when you need it.

AWS Savings Plans

Savings Plans are a pricing model that offer significant savings on AWS usage (for example, on Amazon EC2 instances). You commit to a consistent amount of usage, in USD per hour, for a term of 1 or 3 years, and receive a lower price for that usage. For more information, see the AWS Savings Plans User Guide.

Amazon Lex Runtime Service

Amazon Lex provides both build and runtime endpoints. Each endpoint provides a set of operations (API). Your conversational bot uses the runtime API to understand user utterances (user input text or voice). For example, suppose a user says "I want pizza", your bot sends this input to Amazon Lex using the runtime API. Amazon Lex recognizes that the user request is for the OrderPizza intent (one of the intents defined in the bot). Then Amazon Lex engages in user conversation on behalf of the bot to elicit required information (slot values, such as pizza size and crust type), and then performs fulfillment activity (that you configured when you created the bot). You use the build-time API to create and manage your Amazon Lex bot. For a list of build-time operations, see the build-time API, .

AWS Key Management Service

Key Management Service Key Management Service (KMS) is an encryption and key management web service. This guide describes the KMS operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about KMS, see the Key Management Service Developer Guide . KMS is replacing the term customer master key (CMK) with KMS key and KMS key. The concept has not changed. To prevent breaking changes, KMS is keeping some variations of this term. Amazon Web Services provides SDKs that consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .Net, macOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to KMS and other Amazon Web Services services. For example, the SDKs take care of tasks such as signing requests (see below), managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services. We recommend that you use the Amazon Web Services SDKs to make programmatic API calls to KMS. Clients must support TLS (Transport Layer Security) 1.0. We recommend TLS 1.2. Clients must also support cipher suites with Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) such as Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (DHE) or Elliptic Curve Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (ECDHE). Most modern systems such as Java 7 and later support these modes. Signing Requests Requests must be signed by using an access key ID and a secret access key. We strongly recommend that you do not use your Amazon Web Services account (root) access key ID and secret key for everyday work with KMS. Instead, use the access key ID and secret access key for an IAM user. You can also use the Amazon Web Services Security Token Service to generate temporary security credentials that you can use to sign requests. All KMS operations require Signature Version 4. Logging API Requests KMS supports CloudTrail, a service that logs Amazon Web Services API calls and related events for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers them to an Amazon S3 bucket that you specify. By using the information collected by CloudTrail, you can determine what requests were made to KMS, who made the request, when it was made, and so on. To learn more about CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the CloudTrail User Guide. Additional Resources For more information about credentials and request signing, see the following: Amazon Web Services Security Credentials - This topic provides general information about the types of credentials used to access Amazon Web Services. Temporary Security Credentials - This section of the IAM User Guide describes how to create and use temporary security credentials. Signature Version 4 Signing Process - This set of topics walks you through the process of signing a request using an access key ID and a secret access key. Commonly Used API Operations Of the API operations discussed in this guide, the following will prove the most useful for most applications. You will likely perform operations other than these, such as creating keys and assigning policies, by using the console. Encrypt Decrypt GenerateDataKey GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

AWS RDS DataService

Amazon RDS Data Service Amazon RDS provides an HTTP endpoint to run SQL statements on an Amazon Aurora Serverless DB cluster. To run these statements, you work with the Data Service API. For more information about the Data Service API, see Using the Data API for Aurora Serverless in the Amazon Aurora User Guide.

Amazon Sagemaker Edge Manager

SageMaker Edge Manager dataplane service for communicating with active agents.

Amazon Lex Model Building V2

Other APIs in the same category

Amazon CloudSearch Domain

You use the AmazonCloudSearch2013 API to upload documents to a search domain and search those documents. The endpoints for submitting UploadDocuments, Search, and Suggest requests are domain-specific. To get the endpoints for your domain, use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service DescribeDomains action. The domain endpoints are also displayed on the domain dashboard in the Amazon CloudSearch console. You submit suggest requests to the search endpoint. For more information, see the Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide.

Azure SQL Database

azure.com
Provides create, read, update and delete functionality for Azure SQL Database resources including servers, databases, elastic pools, recommendations, and operations.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing retrieving a collection of policy snippets available in Azure API Management deployment.

AWS DataSync

DataSync DataSync is a managed data transfer service that makes it simpler for you to automate moving data between on-premises storage and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) or Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS). This API interface reference for DataSync contains documentation for a programming interface that you can use to manage DataSync.

AWS AppSync

AppSync provides API actions for creating and interacting with data sources using GraphQL from your application.

Amazon Simple Email Service

Amazon Simple Email Service This document contains reference information for the Amazon Simple Email Service (Amazon SES) API, version 2010-12-01. This document is best used in conjunction with the Amazon SES Developer Guide. For a list of Amazon SES endpoints to use in service requests, see Regions and Amazon SES in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

Application Insights Data Plane

This API exposes AI metric & event information and associated metadata

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on Email Templates associated with your Azure API Management deployment.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on Cache entity in your Azure API Management deployment. Azure API Management also allows for caching responses in an external Azure Cache for Redis. For more information refer to External Redis Cache in ApiManagement.

AWS Direct Connect

Direct Connect links your internal network to an Direct Connect location over a standard Ethernet fiber-optic cable. One end of the cable is connected to your router, the other to an Direct Connect router. With this connection in place, you can create virtual interfaces directly to the Cloud (for example, to Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3) and to Amazon VPC, bypassing Internet service providers in your network path. A connection provides access to all Regions except the China (Beijing) and (China) Ningxia Regions. Amazon Web Services resources in the China Regions can only be accessed through locations associated with those Regions.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations to retrieve Products by Tags in Azure API Management deployment.

AWS WAFV2

WAF This is the latest version of the WAF API, released in November, 2019. The names of the entities that you use to access this API, like endpoints and namespaces, all have the versioning information added, like "V2" or "v2", to distinguish from the prior version. We recommend migrating your resources to this version, because it has a number of significant improvements. If you used WAF prior to this release, you can't use this WAFV2 API to access any WAF resources that you created before. You can access your old rules, web ACLs, and other WAF resources only through the WAF Classic APIs. The WAF Classic APIs have retained the prior names, endpoints, and namespaces. For information, including how to migrate your WAF resources to this version, see the WAF Developer Guide. WAF is a web application firewall that lets you monitor the HTTP and HTTPS requests that are forwarded to Amazon CloudFront, an Amazon API Gateway REST API, an Application Load Balancer, or an AppSync GraphQL API. WAF also lets you control access to your content. Based on conditions that you specify, such as the IP addresses that requests originate from or the values of query strings, the Amazon API Gateway REST API, CloudFront distribution, the Application Load Balancer, or the AppSync GraphQL API responds to requests either with the requested content or with an HTTP 403 status code (Forbidden). You also can configure CloudFront to return a custom error page when a request is blocked. This API guide is for developers who need detailed information about WAF API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about WAF features and an overview of how to use WAF, see the WAF Developer Guide. You can make calls using the endpoints listed in WAF endpoints and quotas. For regional applications, you can use any of the endpoints in the list. A regional application can be an Application Load Balancer (ALB), an Amazon API Gateway REST API, or an AppSync GraphQL API. For Amazon CloudFront applications, you must use the API endpoint listed for US East (N. Virginia): us-east-1. Alternatively, you can use one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs to access an API that's tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see Amazon Web Services SDKs. We currently provide two versions of the WAF API: this API and the prior versions, the classic WAF APIs. This new API provides the same functionality as the older versions, with the following major improvements: You use one API for both global and regional applications. Where you need to distinguish the scope, you specify a Scope parameter and set it to CLOUDFRONT or REGIONAL. You can define a web ACL or rule group with a single call, and update it with a single call. You define all rule specifications in JSON format, and pass them to your rule group or web ACL calls. The limits WAF places on the use of rules more closely reflects the cost of running each type of rule. Rule groups include capacity settings, so you know the maximum cost of a rule group when you use it.