Mock sample for your project: Amazon Interactive Video Service API

Integrate with "Amazon Interactive Video Service API" from amazonaws.com in no time with Mockoon's ready to use mock sample

Amazon Interactive Video Service

amazonaws.com

Version: 2020-07-14


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "Amazon Interactive Video Service API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and allow you to stop relying on an external API to get the job done. No more API keys to provision, accesses to configure or unplanned downtime, just work.
Enhance your development infrastructure by mocking third party APIs during integrating testing.

Description

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Data Exchange

AWS Data Exchange is a service that makes it easy for AWS customers to exchange data in the cloud. You can use the AWS Data Exchange APIs to create, update, manage, and access file-based data set in the AWS Cloud. As a subscriber, you can view and access the data sets that you have an entitlement to through a subscription. You can use the APIS to download or copy your entitled data sets to Amazon S3 for use across a variety of AWS analytics and machine learning services. As a provider, you can create and manage your data sets that you would like to publish to a product. Being able to package and provide your data sets into products requires a few steps to determine eligibility. For more information, visit the AWS Data Exchange User Guide. A data set is a collection of data that can be changed or updated over time. Data sets can be updated using revisions, which represent a new version or incremental change to a data set. A revision contains one or more assets. An asset in AWS Data Exchange is a piece of data that can be stored as an Amazon S3 object. The asset can be a structured data file, an image file, or some other data file. Jobs are asynchronous import or export operations used to create or copy assets.
The Amazon Braket API Reference provides information about the operations and structures supported in Amazon Braket.

AWS Storage Gateway

Storage Gateway Service Storage Gateway is the service that connects an on-premises software appliance with cloud-based storage to provide seamless and secure integration between an organization's on-premises IT environment and the Amazon Web Services storage infrastructure. The service enables you to securely upload data to the Cloud for cost effective backup and rapid disaster recovery. Use the following links to get started using the Storage Gateway Service API Reference : Storage Gateway required request headers : Describes the required headers that you must send with every POST request to Storage Gateway. Signing requests : Storage Gateway requires that you authenticate every request you send; this topic describes how sign such a request. Error responses : Provides reference information about Storage Gateway errors. Operations in Storage Gateway : Contains detailed descriptions of all Storage Gateway operations, their request parameters, response elements, possible errors, and examples of requests and responses. Storage Gateway endpoints and quotas : Provides a list of each Region and the endpoints available for use with Storage Gateway. Storage Gateway resource IDs are in uppercase. When you use these resource IDs with the Amazon EC2 API, EC2 expects resource IDs in lowercase. You must change your resource ID to lowercase to use it with the EC2 API. For example, in Storage Gateway the ID for a volume might be vol-AA22BB012345DAF670. When you use this ID with the EC2 API, you must change it to vol-aa22bb012345daf670. Otherwise, the EC2 API might not behave as expected. IDs for Storage Gateway volumes and Amazon EBS snapshots created from gateway volumes are changing to a longer format. Starting in December 2016, all new volumes and snapshots will be created with a 17-character string. Starting in April 2016, you will be able to use these longer IDs so you can test your systems with the new format. For more information, see Longer EC2 and EBS resource IDs. For example, a volume Amazon Resource Name (ARN) with the longer volume ID format looks like the following: arn:aws:storagegateway:us-west-2:111122223333:gateway/sgw-12A3456B/volume/vol-1122AABBCCDDEEFFG. A snapshot ID with the longer ID format looks like the following: snap-78e226633445566ee. For more information, see Announcement: Heads-up – Longer Storage Gateway volume and snapshot IDs coming in 2016.

AWS Amplify

Amplify enables developers to develop and deploy cloud-powered mobile and web apps. The Amplify Console provides a continuous delivery and hosting service for web applications. For more information, see the Amplify Console User Guide. The Amplify Framework is a comprehensive set of SDKs, libraries, tools, and documentation for client app development. For more information, see the Amplify Framework.

AWS Security Token Service

Security Token Service Security Token Service (STS) enables you to request temporary, limited-privilege credentials for Identity and Access Management (IAM) users or for users that you authenticate (federated users). This guide provides descriptions of the STS API. For more information about using this service, see Temporary Security Credentials.

AWS Budgets

The AWS Budgets API enables you to use AWS Budgets to plan your service usage, service costs, and instance reservations. The API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for AWS Budgets. Budgets provide you with a way to see the following information: How close your plan is to your budgeted amount or to the free tier limits Your usage-to-date, including how much you've used of your Reserved Instances (RIs) Your current estimated charges from AWS, and how much your predicted usage will accrue in charges by the end of the month How much of your budget has been used AWS updates your budget status several times a day. Budgets track your unblended costs, subscriptions, refunds, and RIs. You can create the following types of budgets: Cost budgets - Plan how much you want to spend on a service. Usage budgets - Plan how much you want to use one or more services. RI utilization budgets - Define a utilization threshold, and receive alerts when your RI usage falls below that threshold. This lets you see if your RIs are unused or under-utilized. RI coverage budgets - Define a coverage threshold, and receive alerts when the number of your instance hours that are covered by RIs fall below that threshold. This lets you see how much of your instance usage is covered by a reservation. Service Endpoint The AWS Budgets API provides the following endpoint: https://budgets.amazonaws.com For information about costs that are associated with the AWS Budgets API, see AWS Cost Management Pricing.

Amazon EMR Containers

Amazon EMR on EKS provides a deployment option for Amazon EMR that allows you to run open-source big data frameworks on Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS). With this deployment option, you can focus on running analytics workloads while Amazon EMR on EKS builds, configures, and manages containers for open-source applications. For more information about Amazon EMR on EKS concepts and tasks, see What is Amazon EMR on EKS. Amazon EMR containers is the API name for Amazon EMR on EKS. The emr-containers prefix is used in the following scenarios: It is the prefix in the CLI commands for Amazon EMR on EKS. For example, aws emr-containers start-job-run. It is the prefix before IAM policy actions for Amazon EMR on EKS. For example,"Action": [ "emr-containers:StartJobRun"]. For more information, see Policy actions for Amazon EMR on EKS. It is the prefix used in Amazon EMR on EKS service endpoints. For example, emr-containers.us-east-2.amazonaws.com. For more information, see Amazon EMR on EKS Service Endpoints.

AWS S3 Control

Amazon Web Services S3 Control provides access to Amazon S3 control plane actions.

Amazon Transcribe Service

Operations and objects for transcribing speech to text.

Amazon Elasticsearch Service

Amazon Elasticsearch Configuration Service Use the Amazon Elasticsearch Configuration API to create, configure, and manage Elasticsearch domains. For sample code that uses the Configuration API, see the Amazon Elasticsearch Service Developer Guide. The guide also contains sample code for sending signed HTTP requests to the Elasticsearch APIs. The endpoint for configuration service requests is region-specific: es. region.amazonaws.com. For example, es.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. For a current list of supported regions and endpoints, see Regions and Endpoints.

Amazon Route 53 Domains

Amazon Route 53 API actions let you register domain names and perform related operations.

Amazon Timestream Query

Other APIs in the same category

Cosmos DB

azure.com
Azure Cosmos DB Database Service Resource Provider REST API

AWS Budgets

The AWS Budgets API enables you to use AWS Budgets to plan your service usage, service costs, and instance reservations. The API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for AWS Budgets. Budgets provide you with a way to see the following information: How close your plan is to your budgeted amount or to the free tier limits Your usage-to-date, including how much you've used of your Reserved Instances (RIs) Your current estimated charges from AWS, and how much your predicted usage will accrue in charges by the end of the month How much of your budget has been used AWS updates your budget status several times a day. Budgets track your unblended costs, subscriptions, refunds, and RIs. You can create the following types of budgets: Cost budgets - Plan how much you want to spend on a service. Usage budgets - Plan how much you want to use one or more services. RI utilization budgets - Define a utilization threshold, and receive alerts when your RI usage falls below that threshold. This lets you see if your RIs are unused or under-utilized. RI coverage budgets - Define a coverage threshold, and receive alerts when the number of your instance hours that are covered by RIs fall below that threshold. This lets you see how much of your instance usage is covered by a reservation. Service Endpoint The AWS Budgets API provides the following endpoint: https://budgets.amazonaws.com For information about costs that are associated with the AWS Budgets API, see AWS Cost Management Pricing.

AWS App Mesh

App Mesh is a service mesh based on the Envoy proxy that makes it easy to monitor and control microservices. App Mesh standardizes how your microservices communicate, giving you end-to-end visibility and helping to ensure high availability for your applications. App Mesh gives you consistent visibility and network traffic controls for every microservice in an application. You can use App Mesh with Amazon Web Services Fargate, Amazon ECS, Amazon EKS, Kubernetes on Amazon Web Services, and Amazon EC2. App Mesh supports microservice applications that use service discovery naming for their components. For more information about service discovery on Amazon ECS, see Service Discovery in the Amazon Elastic Container Service Developer Guide. Kubernetes kube-dns and coredns are supported. For more information, see DNS for Services and Pods in the Kubernetes documentation.

Amazon Athena

Amazon Athena is an interactive query service that lets you use standard SQL to analyze data directly in Amazon S3. You can point Athena at your data in Amazon S3 and run ad-hoc queries and get results in seconds. Athena is serverless, so there is no infrastructure to set up or manage. You pay only for the queries you run. Athena scales automaticallyβ€”executing queries in parallelβ€”so results are fast, even with large datasets and complex queries. For more information, see What is Amazon Athena in the Amazon Athena User Guide. If you connect to Athena using the JDBC driver, use version 1.1.0 of the driver or later with the Amazon Athena API. Earlier version drivers do not support the API. For more information and to download the driver, see Accessing Amazon Athena with JDBC. For code samples using the Amazon Web Services SDK for Java, see Examples and Code Samples in the Amazon Athena User Guide.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing retrieving a collection of policy snippets available in Azure API Management deployment.

Elastic Load Balancing

Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer can distribute incoming traffic across your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered instances and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy instances. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer and a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the instances. Elastic Load Balancing supports three types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. You can select a load balancer based on your application needs. For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. This reference covers the 2012-06-01 API, which supports Classic Load Balancers. The 2015-12-01 API supports Application Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers. To get started, create a load balancer with one or more listeners using CreateLoadBalancer. Register your instances with the load balancer using RegisterInstancesWithLoadBalancer. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds with a 200 OK response code.

AutomationManagement

azure.com

StorageManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Storage Management Client.

AWS CodeStar

AWS CodeStar This is the API reference for AWS CodeStar. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeStar API to work with: Projects and their resources, by calling the following: DeleteProject, which deletes a project. DescribeProject, which lists the attributes of a project. ListProjects, which lists all projects associated with your AWS account. ListResources, which lists the resources associated with a project. ListTagsForProject, which lists the tags associated with a project. TagProject, which adds tags to a project. UntagProject, which removes tags from a project. UpdateProject, which updates the attributes of a project. Teams and team members, by calling the following: AssociateTeamMember, which adds an IAM user to the team for a project. DisassociateTeamMember, which removes an IAM user from the team for a project. ListTeamMembers, which lists all the IAM users in the team for a project, including their roles and attributes. UpdateTeamMember, which updates a team member's attributes in a project. Users, by calling the following: CreateUserProfile, which creates a user profile that contains data associated with the user across all projects. DeleteUserProfile, which deletes all user profile information across all projects. DescribeUserProfile, which describes the profile of a user. ListUserProfiles, which lists all user profiles. UpdateUserProfile, which updates the profile for a user.

AWS Resource Groups

AWS Resource Groups AWS Resource Groups lets you organize AWS resources such as Amazon EC2 instances, Amazon Relational Database Service databases, and Amazon S3 buckets into groups using criteria that you define as tags. A resource group is a collection of resources that match the resource types specified in a query, and share one or more tags or portions of tags. You can create a group of resources based on their roles in your cloud infrastructure, lifecycle stages, regions, application layers, or virtually any criteria. Resource Groups enable you to automate management tasks, such as those in AWS Systems Manager Automation documents, on tag-related resources in AWS Systems Manager. Groups of tagged resources also let you quickly view a custom console in AWS Systems Manager that shows AWS Config compliance and other monitoring data about member resources. To create a resource group, build a resource query, and specify tags that identify the criteria that members of the group have in common. Tags are key-value pairs. For more information about Resource Groups, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide. AWS Resource Groups uses a REST-compliant API that you can use to perform the following types of operations. Create, Read, Update, and Delete (CRUD) operations on resource groups and resource query entities Applying, editing, and removing tags from resource groups Resolving resource group member ARNs so they can be returned as search results Getting data about resources that are members of a group Searching AWS resources based on a resource query

AWS Marketplace Commerce Analytics

Provides AWS Marketplace business intelligence data on-demand.

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles Welcome to the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API Reference. This guide provides information about the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API, including supported operations, data types, parameters, and schemas. Amazon Connect Customer Profiles is a unified customer profile for your contact center that has pre-built connectors powered by AppFlow that make it easy to combine customer information from third party applications, such as Salesforce (CRM), ServiceNow (ITSM), and your enterprise resource planning (ERP), with contact history from your Amazon Connect contact center. If you're new to Amazon Connect , you might find it helpful to also review the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide.