Mock sample for your project: AWS IoT Events API

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AWS IoT Events

amazonaws.com

Version: 2018-07-27


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "AWS IoT Events API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

AWS IoT Events monitors your equipment or device fleets for failures or changes in operation, and triggers actions when such events occur. You can use AWS IoT Events API operations to create, read, update, and delete inputs and detector models, and to list their versions.

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