Mock sample for your project: AWS Lake Formation API

Integrate with "AWS Lake Formation API" from amazonaws.com in no time with Mockoon's ready to use mock sample

AWS Lake Formation

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-03-31


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "AWS Lake Formation API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
Improve your integration tests by mocking third-party APIs and cover more edge cases: slow response time, random failures, etc.

Description

AWS Lake Formation Defines the public endpoint for the AWS Lake Formation service.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Directory Service

Directory Service Directory Service is a web service that makes it easy for you to setup and run directories in the Amazon Web Services cloud, or connect your Amazon Web Services resources with an existing self-managed Microsoft Active Directory. This guide provides detailed information about Directory Service operations, data types, parameters, and errors. For information about Directory Services features, see Directory Service and the Directory Service Administration Guide. Amazon Web Services provides SDKs that consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .Net, iOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to Directory Service and other Amazon Web Services services. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services.

Amazon DevOps Guru

Amazon DevOps Guru is a fully managed service that helps you identify anomalous behavior in business critical operational applications. You specify the AWS resources that you want DevOps Guru to cover, then the Amazon CloudWatch metrics and AWS CloudTrail events related to those resources are analyzed. When anomalous behavior is detected, DevOps Guru creates an insight that includes recommendations, related events, and related metrics that can help you improve your operational applications. For more information, see What is Amazon DevOps Guru. You can specify 1 or 2 Amazon Simple Notification Service topics so you are notified every time a new insight is created. You can also enable DevOps Guru to generate an OpsItem in AWS Systems Manager for each insight to help you manage and track your work addressing insights. To learn about the DevOps Guru workflow, see How DevOps Guru works. To learn about DevOps Guru concepts, see Concepts in DevOps Guru.

AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

Amazon Cognito Identity

Amazon Cognito Federated Identities Amazon Cognito Federated Identities is a web service that delivers scoped temporary credentials to mobile devices and other untrusted environments. It uniquely identifies a device and supplies the user with a consistent identity over the lifetime of an application. Using Amazon Cognito Federated Identities, you can enable authentication with one or more third-party identity providers (Facebook, Google, or Login with Amazon) or an Amazon Cognito user pool, and you can also choose to support unauthenticated access from your app. Cognito delivers a unique identifier for each user and acts as an OpenID token provider trusted by AWS Security Token Service (STS) to access temporary, limited-privilege AWS credentials. For a description of the authentication flow from the Amazon Cognito Developer Guide see Authentication Flow. For more information see Amazon Cognito Federated Identities.

AWS CloudHSM V2

For more information about AWS CloudHSM, see AWS CloudHSM and the AWS CloudHSM User Guide.

Amazon CloudHSM

AWS CloudHSM Service This is documentation for AWS CloudHSM Classic. For more information, see AWS CloudHSM Classic FAQs, the AWS CloudHSM Classic User Guide, and the AWS CloudHSM Classic API Reference. For information about the current version of AWS CloudHSM, see AWS CloudHSM, the AWS CloudHSM User Guide, and the AWS CloudHSM API Reference.

AWS DataSync

DataSync DataSync is a managed data transfer service that makes it simpler for you to automate moving data between on-premises storage and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) or Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS). This API interface reference for DataSync contains documentation for a programming interface that you can use to manage DataSync.

Amazon Cognito Identity Provider

Using the Amazon Cognito User Pools API, you can create a user pool to manage directories and users. You can authenticate a user to obtain tokens related to user identity and access policies. This API reference provides information about user pools in Amazon Cognito User Pools. For more information, see the Amazon Cognito Documentation.

Amazon CloudSearch

Amazon CloudSearch Configuration Service You use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service to create, configure, and manage search domains. Configuration service requests are submitted using the AWS Query protocol. AWS Query requests are HTTP or HTTPS requests submitted via HTTP GET or POST with a query parameter named Action. The endpoint for configuration service requests is region-specific: cloudsearch. region.amazonaws.com. For example, cloudsearch.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. For a current list of supported regions and endpoints, see Regions and Endpoints.

Access Analyzer

Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer helps identify potential resource-access risks by enabling you to identify any policies that grant access to an external principal. It does this by using logic-based reasoning to analyze resource-based policies in your Amazon Web Services environment. An external principal can be another Amazon Web Services account, a root user, an IAM user or role, a federated user, an Amazon Web Services service, or an anonymous user. You can also use IAM Access Analyzer to preview and validate public and cross-account access to your resources before deploying permissions changes. This guide describes the Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about IAM Access Analyzer, see Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer in the IAM User Guide. To start using IAM Access Analyzer, you first need to create an analyzer.

AWS Auto Scaling Plans

AWS Auto Scaling Use AWS Auto Scaling to create scaling plans for your applications to automatically scale your scalable AWS resources. API Summary You can use the AWS Auto Scaling service API to accomplish the following tasks: Create and manage scaling plans Define target tracking scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources based on utilization Scale Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups using predictive scaling and dynamic scaling to scale your Amazon EC2 capacity faster Set minimum and maximum capacity limits Retrieve information on existing scaling plans Access current forecast data and historical forecast data for up to 56 days previous To learn more about AWS Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for AWS Auto Scaling actions, see the AWS Auto Scaling User Guide.

Amazon Mechanical Turk

Amazon Mechanical Turk API Reference

Other APIs in the same category

MariaDBManagementClient

azure.com
The Microsoft Azure management API provides create, read, update, and delete functionality for Azure MariaDB resources including servers, databases, firewall rules, VNET rules, security alert policies, log files and configurations with new business model.

Amazon WorkSpaces

Amazon WorkSpaces Service Amazon WorkSpaces enables you to provision virtual, cloud-based Microsoft Windows and Amazon Linux desktops for your users.

AWS CloudTrail

CloudTrail This is the CloudTrail API Reference. It provides descriptions of actions, data types, common parameters, and common errors for CloudTrail. CloudTrail is a web service that records Amazon Web Services API calls for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. The recorded information includes the identity of the user, the start time of the Amazon Web Services API call, the source IP address, the request parameters, and the response elements returned by the service. As an alternative to the API, you can use one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs, which consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .NET, iOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide programmatic access to CloudTrail. For example, the SDKs handle cryptographically signing requests, managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools to Build on Amazon Web Services. See the CloudTrail User Guide for information about the data that is included with each Amazon Web Services API call listed in the log files.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on API entity and their Operations associated with your Azure API Management deployment.
This is AWS WAF Classic documentation. For more information, see AWS WAF Classic in the developer guide. For the latest version of AWS WAF, use the AWS WAFV2 API and see the AWS WAF Developer Guide. With the latest version, AWS WAF has a single set of endpoints for regional and global use. This is the AWS WAF Classic API Reference for using AWS WAF Classic with Amazon CloudFront. The AWS WAF Classic actions and data types listed in the reference are available for protecting Amazon CloudFront distributions. You can use these actions and data types via the endpoint waf.amazonaws.com. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the AWS WAF Classic API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about AWS WAF Classic features and an overview of how to use the AWS WAF Classic API, see the AWS WAF Classic in the developer guide.

AWS IoT Jobs Data Plane

AWS IoT Jobs is a service that allows you to define a set of jobs — remote operations that are sent to and executed on one or more devices connected to AWS IoT. For example, you can define a job that instructs a set of devices to download and install application or firmware updates, reboot, rotate certificates, or perform remote troubleshooting operations. To create a job, you make a job document which is a description of the remote operations to be performed, and you specify a list of targets that should perform the operations. The targets can be individual things, thing groups or both. AWS IoT Jobs sends a message to inform the targets that a job is available. The target starts the execution of the job by downloading the job document, performing the operations it specifies, and reporting its progress to AWS IoT. The Jobs service provides commands to track the progress of a job on a specific target and for all the targets of the job

Azure Stack Azure Bridge Client

azure.com

SubscriptionsManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Subscriptions Management Client.

AutomationManagement

azure.com

Managed Streaming for Kafka Connect

Platform API

The REST API specification for Ably.

AWS IoT 1-Click Devices Service

Describes all of the AWS IoT 1-Click device-related API operations for the service.
Also provides sample requests, responses, and errors for the supported web services
protocols.