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Amazon CodeGuru Profiler

amazonaws.com

Version: 2019-07-18


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "Amazon CodeGuru Profiler API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

This section provides documentation for the Amazon CodeGuru Profiler API operations. Amazon CodeGuru Profiler collects runtime performance data from your live applications, and provides recommendations that can help you fine-tune your application performance. Using machine learning algorithms, CodeGuru Profiler can help you find your most expensive lines of code and suggest ways you can improve efficiency and remove CPU bottlenecks. Amazon CodeGuru Profiler provides different visualizations of profiling data to help you identify what code is running on the CPU, see how much time is consumed, and suggest ways to reduce CPU utilization. Amazon CodeGuru Profiler currently supports applications written in all Java virtual machine (JVM) languages and Python. While CodeGuru Profiler supports both visualizations and recommendations for applications written in Java, it can also generate visualizations and a subset of recommendations for applications written in other JVM languages and Python. For more information, see What is Amazon CodeGuru Profiler in the Amazon CodeGuru Profiler User Guide.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Amazon EMR Containers

Amazon EMR on EKS provides a deployment option for Amazon EMR that allows you to run open-source big data frameworks on Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS). With this deployment option, you can focus on running analytics workloads while Amazon EMR on EKS builds, configures, and manages containers for open-source applications. For more information about Amazon EMR on EKS concepts and tasks, see What is Amazon EMR on EKS. Amazon EMR containers is the API name for Amazon EMR on EKS. The emr-containers prefix is used in the following scenarios: It is the prefix in the CLI commands for Amazon EMR on EKS. For example, aws emr-containers start-job-run. It is the prefix before IAM policy actions for Amazon EMR on EKS. For example,"Action": [ "emr-containers:StartJobRun"]. For more information, see Policy actions for Amazon EMR on EKS. It is the prefix used in Amazon EMR on EKS service endpoints. For example, emr-containers.us-east-2.amazonaws.com. For more information, see Amazon EMR on EKS Service Endpoints.

Amazon CloudSearch Domain

You use the AmazonCloudSearch2013 API to upload documents to a search domain and search those documents. The endpoints for submitting UploadDocuments, Search, and Suggest requests are domain-specific. To get the endpoints for your domain, use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service DescribeDomains action. The domain endpoints are also displayed on the domain dashboard in the Amazon CloudSearch console. You submit suggest requests to the search endpoint. For more information, see the Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide.

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

AWS Config

Config Config provides a way to keep track of the configurations of all the Amazon Web Services resources associated with your Amazon Web Services account. You can use Config to get the current and historical configurations of each Amazon Web Services resource and also to get information about the relationship between the resources. An Amazon Web Services resource can be an Amazon Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance, an Elastic Block Store (EBS) volume, an elastic network Interface (ENI), or a security group. For a complete list of resources currently supported by Config, see Supported Amazon Web Services resources. You can access and manage Config through the Amazon Web Services Management Console, the Amazon Web Services Command Line Interface (Amazon Web Services CLI), the Config API, or the Amazon Web Services SDKs for Config. This reference guide contains documentation for the Config API and the Amazon Web Services CLI commands that you can use to manage Config. The Config API uses the Signature Version 4 protocol for signing requests. For more information about how to sign a request with this protocol, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process. For detailed information about Config features and their associated actions or commands, as well as how to work with Amazon Web Services Management Console, see What Is Config in the Config Developer Guide.

AWS Glue DataBrew

Glue DataBrew is a visual, cloud-scale data-preparation service. DataBrew simplifies data preparation tasks, targeting data issues that are hard to spot and time-consuming to fix. DataBrew empowers users of all technical levels to visualize the data and perform one-click data transformations, with no coding required.

Amazon Athena

Amazon Athena is an interactive query service that lets you use standard SQL to analyze data directly in Amazon S3. You can point Athena at your data in Amazon S3 and run ad-hoc queries and get results in seconds. Athena is serverless, so there is no infrastructure to set up or manage. You pay only for the queries you run. Athena scales automatically—executing queries in parallel—so results are fast, even with large datasets and complex queries. For more information, see What is Amazon Athena in the Amazon Athena User Guide. If you connect to Athena using the JDBC driver, use version 1.1.0 of the driver or later with the Amazon Athena API. Earlier version drivers do not support the API. For more information and to download the driver, see Accessing Amazon Athena with JDBC. For code samples using the Amazon Web Services SDK for Java, see Examples and Code Samples in the Amazon Athena User Guide.

Amazon DevOps Guru

Amazon DevOps Guru is a fully managed service that helps you identify anomalous behavior in business critical operational applications. You specify the AWS resources that you want DevOps Guru to cover, then the Amazon CloudWatch metrics and AWS CloudTrail events related to those resources are analyzed. When anomalous behavior is detected, DevOps Guru creates an insight that includes recommendations, related events, and related metrics that can help you improve your operational applications. For more information, see What is Amazon DevOps Guru. You can specify 1 or 2 Amazon Simple Notification Service topics so you are notified every time a new insight is created. You can also enable DevOps Guru to generate an OpsItem in AWS Systems Manager for each insight to help you manage and track your work addressing insights. To learn about the DevOps Guru workflow, see How DevOps Guru works. To learn about DevOps Guru concepts, see Concepts in DevOps Guru.

Application Auto Scaling

With Application Auto Scaling, you can configure automatic scaling for the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 fleets Amazon Aurora Replicas Amazon Comprehend document classification and entity recognizer endpoints Amazon DynamoDB tables and global secondary indexes throughput capacity Amazon ECS services Amazon ElastiCache for Redis clusters (replication groups) Amazon EMR clusters Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra) tables Lambda function provisioned concurrency Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka broker storage Amazon SageMaker endpoint variants Spot Fleet (Amazon EC2) requests Custom resources provided by your own applications or services API Summary The Application Auto Scaling service API includes three key sets of actions: Register and manage scalable targets - Register Amazon Web Services or custom resources as scalable targets (a resource that Application Auto Scaling can scale), set minimum and maximum capacity limits, and retrieve information on existing scalable targets. Configure and manage automatic scaling - Define scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources in response to CloudWatch alarms, schedule one-time or recurring scaling actions, and retrieve your recent scaling activity history. Suspend and resume scaling - Temporarily suspend and later resume automatic scaling by calling the RegisterScalableTarget API action for any Application Auto Scaling scalable target. You can suspend and resume (individually or in combination) scale-out activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, scale-in activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, and scheduled scaling. To learn more about Application Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for Application Auto Scaling actions, see the Application Auto Scaling User Guide.

AWS Device Farm

Welcome to the AWS Device Farm API documentation, which contains APIs for: Testing on desktop browsers Device Farm makes it possible for you to test your web applications on desktop browsers using Selenium. The APIs for desktop browser testing contain TestGrid in their names. For more information, see Testing Web Applications on Selenium with Device Farm. Testing on real mobile devices Device Farm makes it possible for you to test apps on physical phones, tablets, and other devices in the cloud. For more information, see the Device Farm Developer Guide.

Amazon CloudSearch

Amazon CloudSearch Configuration Service You use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service to create, configure, and manage search domains. Configuration service requests are submitted using the AWS Query protocol. AWS Query requests are HTTP or HTTPS requests submitted via HTTP GET or POST with a query parameter named Action. The endpoint for configuration service requests is region-specific: cloudsearch. region.amazonaws.com. For example, cloudsearch.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. For a current list of supported regions and endpoints, see Regions and Endpoints.

AWS CloudTrail

CloudTrail This is the CloudTrail API Reference. It provides descriptions of actions, data types, common parameters, and common errors for CloudTrail. CloudTrail is a web service that records Amazon Web Services API calls for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. The recorded information includes the identity of the user, the start time of the Amazon Web Services API call, the source IP address, the request parameters, and the response elements returned by the service. As an alternative to the API, you can use one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs, which consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .NET, iOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide programmatic access to CloudTrail. For example, the SDKs handle cryptographically signing requests, managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools to Build on Amazon Web Services. See the CloudTrail User Guide for information about the data that is included with each Amazon Web Services API call listed in the log files.

Amazon Chime

The Amazon Chime API (application programming interface) is designed for developers to perform key tasks, such as creating and managing Amazon Chime accounts, users, and Voice Connectors. This guide provides detailed information about the Amazon Chime API, including operations, types, inputs and outputs, and error codes. It also includes some server-side API actions to use with the Amazon Chime SDK. For more information about the Amazon Chime SDK, see Using the Amazon Chime SDK in the Amazon Chime Developer Guide. You can use an AWS SDK, the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or the REST API to make API calls. We recommend using an AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Each API operation includes links to information about using it with a language-specific AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Using an AWS SDK You don't need to write code to calculate a signature for request authentication. The SDK clients authenticate your requests by using access keys that you provide. For more information about AWS SDKs, see the AWS Developer Center. Using the AWS CLI Use your access keys with the AWS CLI to make API calls. For information about setting up the AWS CLI, see Installing the AWS Command Line Interface in the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide. For a list of available Amazon Chime commands, see the Amazon Chime commands in the AWS CLI Command Reference. Using REST APIs If you use REST to make API calls, you must authenticate your request by providing a signature. Amazon Chime supports signature version 4. For more information, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process in the Amazon Web Services General Reference. When making REST API calls, use the service name chime and REST endpoint https://service.chime.aws.amazon.com. Administrative permissions are controlled using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM). For more information, see Identity and Access Management for Amazon Chime in the Amazon Chime Administration Guide.

Other APIs in the same category

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

Amazon AppConfig

AWS AppConfig Use AWS AppConfig, a capability of AWS Systems Manager, to create, manage, and quickly deploy application configurations. AppConfig supports controlled deployments to applications of any size and includes built-in validation checks and monitoring. You can use AppConfig with applications hosted on Amazon EC2 instances, AWS Lambda, containers, mobile applications, or IoT devices. To prevent errors when deploying application configurations, especially for production systems where a simple typo could cause an unexpected outage, AppConfig includes validators. A validator provides a syntactic or semantic check to ensure that the configuration you want to deploy works as intended. To validate your application configuration data, you provide a schema or a Lambda function that runs against the configuration. The configuration deployment or update can only proceed when the configuration data is valid. During a configuration deployment, AppConfig monitors the application to ensure that the deployment is successful. If the system encounters an error, AppConfig rolls back the change to minimize impact for your application users. You can configure a deployment strategy for each application or environment that includes deployment criteria, including velocity, bake time, and alarms to monitor. Similar to error monitoring, if a deployment triggers an alarm, AppConfig automatically rolls back to the previous version. AppConfig supports multiple use cases. Here are some examples. Application tuning : Use AppConfig to carefully introduce changes to your application that can only be tested with production traffic. Feature toggle : Use AppConfig to turn on new features that require a timely deployment, such as a product launch or announcement. Allow list : Use AppConfig to allow premium subscribers to access paid content. Operational issues : Use AppConfig to reduce stress on your application when a dependency or other external factor impacts the system. This reference is intended to be used with the AWS AppConfig User Guide.

Service Quotas

With Service Quotas, you can view and manage your quotas easily as your AWS workloads grow. Quotas, also referred to as limits, are the maximum number of resources that you can create in your AWS account. For more information, see the Service Quotas User Guide.

BackupManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Backup Management Client.

AutomationManagement

azure.com

AzureAnalysisServices

azure.com
The Azure Analysis Services Web API provides a RESTful set of web services that enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete Analysis Services servers

Amazon Timestream Query

AWS Transfer Family

Amazon Web Services Transfer Family is a fully managed service that enables the transfer of files over the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), File Transfer Protocol over SSL (FTPS), or Secure Shell (SSH) File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) directly into and out of Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3). Amazon Web Services helps you seamlessly migrate your file transfer workflows to Amazon Web Services Transfer Family by integrating with existing authentication systems, and providing DNS routing with Amazon Route 53 so nothing changes for your customers and partners, or their applications. With your data in Amazon S3, you can use it with Amazon Web Services services for processing, analytics, machine learning, and archiving. Getting started with Amazon Web Services Transfer Family is easy since there is no infrastructure to buy and set up.

Amazon Mechanical Turk

Amazon Mechanical Turk API Reference

AWS Performance Insights

Amazon RDS Performance Insights Amazon RDS Performance Insights enables you to monitor and explore different dimensions of database load based on data captured from a running DB instance. The guide provides detailed information about Performance Insights data types, parameters and errors. When Performance Insights is enabled, the Amazon RDS Performance Insights API provides visibility into the performance of your DB instance. Amazon CloudWatch provides the authoritative source for AWS service-vended monitoring metrics. Performance Insights offers a domain-specific view of DB load. DB load is measured as Average Active Sessions. Performance Insights provides the data to API consumers as a two-dimensional time-series dataset. The time dimension provides DB load data for each time point in the queried time range. Each time point decomposes overall load in relation to the requested dimensions, measured at that time point. Examples include SQL, Wait event, User, and Host. To learn more about Performance Insights and Amazon Aurora DB instances, go to the Amazon Aurora User Guide. To learn more about Performance Insights and Amazon RDS DB instances, go to the Amazon RDS User Guide.

AWS Data Exchange

AWS Data Exchange is a service that makes it easy for AWS customers to exchange data in the cloud. You can use the AWS Data Exchange APIs to create, update, manage, and access file-based data set in the AWS Cloud. As a subscriber, you can view and access the data sets that you have an entitlement to through a subscription. You can use the APIS to download or copy your entitled data sets to Amazon S3 for use across a variety of AWS analytics and machine learning services. As a provider, you can create and manage your data sets that you would like to publish to a product. Being able to package and provide your data sets into products requires a few steps to determine eligibility. For more information, visit the AWS Data Exchange User Guide. A data set is a collection of data that can be changed or updated over time. Data sets can be updated using revisions, which represent a new version or incremental change to a data set. A revision contains one or more assets. An asset in AWS Data Exchange is a piece of data that can be stored as an Amazon S3 object. The asset can be a structured data file, an image file, or some other data file. Jobs are asynchronous import or export operations used to create or copy assets.

AWS Support

AWS Support The AWS Support API Reference is intended for programmers who need detailed information about the AWS Support operations and data types. You can use the API to manage your support cases programmatically. The AWS Support API uses HTTP methods that return results in JSON format. You must have a Business or Enterprise Support plan to use the AWS Support API. If you call the AWS Support API from an account that does not have a Business or Enterprise Support plan, the SubscriptionRequiredException error message appears. For information about changing your support plan, see AWS Support. The AWS Support service also exposes a set of AWS Trusted Advisor features. You can retrieve a list of checks and their descriptions, get check results, specify checks to refresh, and get the refresh status of checks. The following list describes the AWS Support case management operations: Service names, issue categories, and available severity levels - The DescribeServices and DescribeSeverityLevels operations return AWS service names, service codes, service categories, and problem severity levels. You use these values when you call the CreateCase operation. Case creation, case details, and case resolution - The CreateCase, DescribeCases, DescribeAttachment, and ResolveCase operations create AWS Support cases, retrieve information about cases, and resolve cases. Case communication - The DescribeCommunications, AddCommunicationToCase, and AddAttachmentsToSet operations retrieve and add communications and attachments to AWS Support cases. The following list describes the operations available from the AWS Support service for Trusted Advisor: DescribeTrustedAdvisorChecks returns the list of checks that run against your AWS resources. Using the checkId for a specific check returned by DescribeTrustedAdvisorChecks, you can call DescribeTrustedAdvisorCheckResult to obtain the results for the check that you specified. DescribeTrustedAdvisorCheckSummaries returns summarized results for one or more Trusted Advisor checks. RefreshTrustedAdvisorCheck requests that Trusted Advisor rerun a specified check. DescribeTrustedAdvisorCheckRefreshStatuses reports the refresh status of one or more checks. For authentication of requests, AWS Support uses Signature Version 4 Signing Process. See About the AWS Support API in the AWS Support User Guide for information about how to use this service to create and manage your support cases, and how to call Trusted Advisor for results of checks on your resources.