Mock sample for your project: Amazon Mobile Analytics API

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Amazon Mobile Analytics

amazonaws.com

Version: 2014-06-05


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "Amazon Mobile Analytics API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs: no more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, etc.

Description

Amazon Mobile Analytics is a service for collecting, visualizing, and understanding app usage data at scale.

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