Mock sample for your project: Amazon Comprehend API

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Amazon Comprehend

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-11-27


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Description

Amazon Comprehend is an AWS service for gaining insight into the content of documents. Use these actions to determine the topics contained in your documents, the topics they discuss, the predominant sentiment expressed in them, the predominant language used, and more.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Elastic Beanstalk

AWS Elastic Beanstalk AWS Elastic Beanstalk makes it easy for you to create, deploy, and manage scalable, fault-tolerant applications running on the Amazon Web Services cloud. For more information about this product, go to the AWS Elastic Beanstalk details page. The location of the latest AWS Elastic Beanstalk WSDL is https://elasticbeanstalk.s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2010-12-01/AWSElasticBeanstalk.wsdl. To install the Software Development Kits (SDKs), Integrated Development Environment (IDE) Toolkits, and command line tools that enable you to access the API, go to Tools for Amazon Web Services. Endpoints For a list of region-specific endpoints that AWS Elastic Beanstalk supports, go to Regions and Endpoints in the Amazon Web Services Glossary.

Amazon Import/Export Snowball

AWS Snow Family is a petabyte-scale data transport solution that uses secure devices to transfer large amounts of data between your on-premises data centers and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3). The Snow commands described here provide access to the same functionality that is available in the AWS Snow Family Management Console, which enables you to create and manage jobs for a Snow device. To transfer data locally with a Snow device, you'll need to use the Snowball Edge client or the Amazon S3 API Interface for Snowball or AWS OpsHub for Snow Family. For more information, see the User Guide.

Amazon Connect Participant Service

Amazon Connect is a cloud-based contact center solution that makes it easy to set up and manage a customer contact center and provide reliable customer engagement at any scale. Amazon Connect enables customer contacts through voice or chat. The APIs described here are used by chat participants, such as agents and customers.

Amazon AppStream

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Amazon Prometheus Service

Amazon Managed Service for Prometheus

Amazon CloudDirectory

Amazon Cloud Directory Amazon Cloud Directory is a component of the AWS Directory Service that simplifies the development and management of cloud-scale web, mobile, and IoT applications. This guide describes the Cloud Directory operations that you can call programmatically and includes detailed information on data types and errors. For information about Cloud Directory features, see AWS Directory Service and the Amazon Cloud Directory Developer Guide.

AWS Cost Explorer Service

You can use the Cost Explorer API to programmatically query your cost and usage data. You can query for aggregated data such as total monthly costs or total daily usage. You can also query for granular data. This might include the number of daily write operations for Amazon DynamoDB database tables in your production environment. Service Endpoint The Cost Explorer API provides the following endpoint: https://ce.us-east-1.amazonaws.com For information about the costs that are associated with the Cost Explorer API, see Amazon Web Services Cost Management Pricing.

AWS Amplify

Amplify enables developers to develop and deploy cloud-powered mobile and web apps. The Amplify Console provides a continuous delivery and hosting service for web applications. For more information, see the Amplify Console User Guide. The Amplify Framework is a comprehensive set of SDKs, libraries, tools, and documentation for client app development. For more information, see the Amplify Framework.

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

Amazon CloudSearch Domain

You use the AmazonCloudSearch2013 API to upload documents to a search domain and search those documents. The endpoints for submitting UploadDocuments, Search, and Suggest requests are domain-specific. To get the endpoints for your domain, use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service DescribeDomains action. The domain endpoints are also displayed on the domain dashboard in the Amazon CloudSearch console. You submit suggest requests to the search endpoint. For more information, see the Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide.

AWS Certificate Manager

Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager You can use Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager (ACM) to manage SSL/TLS certificates for your Amazon Web Services-based websites and applications. For more information about using ACM, see the Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager User Guide.

AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

Other APIs in the same category

AWS Data Exchange

AWS Data Exchange is a service that makes it easy for AWS customers to exchange data in the cloud. You can use the AWS Data Exchange APIs to create, update, manage, and access file-based data set in the AWS Cloud. As a subscriber, you can view and access the data sets that you have an entitlement to through a subscription. You can use the APIS to download or copy your entitled data sets to Amazon S3 for use across a variety of AWS analytics and machine learning services. As a provider, you can create and manage your data sets that you would like to publish to a product. Being able to package and provide your data sets into products requires a few steps to determine eligibility. For more information, visit the AWS Data Exchange User Guide. A data set is a collection of data that can be changed or updated over time. Data sets can be updated using revisions, which represent a new version or incremental change to a data set. A revision contains one or more assets. An asset in AWS Data Exchange is a piece of data that can be stored as an Amazon S3 object. The asset can be a structured data file, an image file, or some other data file. Jobs are asynchronous import or export operations used to create or copy assets.

VMwareCloudSimple

azure.com
Description of the new service

Amazon CodeGuru Profiler

This section provides documentation for the Amazon CodeGuru Profiler API operations. Amazon CodeGuru Profiler collects runtime performance data from your live applications, and provides recommendations that can help you fine-tune your application performance. Using machine learning algorithms, CodeGuru Profiler can help you find your most expensive lines of code and suggest ways you can improve efficiency and remove CPU bottlenecks. Amazon CodeGuru Profiler provides different visualizations of profiling data to help you identify what code is running on the CPU, see how much time is consumed, and suggest ways to reduce CPU utilization. Amazon CodeGuru Profiler currently supports applications written in all Java virtual machine (JVM) languages and Python. While CodeGuru Profiler supports both visualizations and recommendations for applications written in Java, it can also generate visualizations and a subset of recommendations for applications written in other JVM languages and Python. For more information, see What is Amazon CodeGuru Profiler in the Amazon CodeGuru Profiler User Guide.

AWS IoT Data Plane

IoT data IoT data enables secure, bi-directional communication between Internet-connected things (such as sensors, actuators, embedded devices, or smart appliances) and the Amazon Web Services cloud. It implements a broker for applications and things to publish messages over HTTP (Publish) and retrieve, update, and delete shadows. A shadow is a persistent representation of your things and their state in the Amazon Web Services cloud. Find the endpoint address for actions in IoT data by running this CLI command: aws iot describe-endpoint --endpoint-type iot:Data-ATS The service name used by Amazon Web ServicesSignature Version 4 to sign requests is: iotdevicegateway.

CertificateRegistrationProvider API Client

azure.com

AWS Network Firewall

This is the API Reference for AWS Network Firewall. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Network Firewall API actions, data types, and errors. The REST API requires you to handle connection details, such as calculating signatures, handling request retries, and error handling. For general information about using the AWS REST APIs, see AWS APIs. To access Network Firewall using the REST API endpoint: https://network-firewall..amazonaws.com Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that's tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. For descriptions of Network Firewall features, including and step-by-step instructions on how to use them through the Network Firewall console, see the Network Firewall Developer Guide. Network Firewall is a stateful, managed, network firewall and intrusion detection and prevention service for Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC). With Network Firewall, you can filter traffic at the perimeter of your VPC. This includes filtering traffic going to and coming from an internet gateway, NAT gateway, or over VPN or AWS Direct Connect. Network Firewall uses rules that are compatible with Suricata, a free, open source intrusion detection system (IDS) engine. For information about Suricata, see the Suricata website. You can use Network Firewall to monitor and protect your VPC traffic in a number of ways. The following are just a few examples: Allow domains or IP addresses for known AWS service endpoints, such as Amazon S3, and block all other forms of traffic. Use custom lists of known bad domains to limit the types of domain names that your applications can access. Perform deep packet inspection on traffic entering or leaving your VPC. Use stateful protocol detection to filter protocols like HTTPS, regardless of the port used. To enable Network Firewall for your VPCs, you perform steps in both Amazon VPC and in Network Firewall. For information about using Amazon VPC, see Amazon VPC User Guide. To start using Network Firewall, do the following: (Optional) If you don't already have a VPC that you want to protect, create it in Amazon VPC. In Amazon VPC, in each Availability Zone where you want to have a firewall endpoint, create a subnet for the sole use of Network Firewall. In Network Firewall, create stateless and stateful rule groups, to define the components of the network traffic filtering behavior that you want your firewall to have. In Network Firewall, create a firewall policy that uses your rule groups and specifies additional default traffic filtering behavior. In Network Firewall, create a firewall and specify your new firewall policy and VPC subnets. Network Firewall creates a firewall endpoint in each subnet that you specify, with the behavior that's defined in the firewall policy. In Amazon VPC, use ingress routing enhancements to route traffic through the new firewall endpoints.

AWS Config

Config Config provides a way to keep track of the configurations of all the Amazon Web Services resources associated with your Amazon Web Services account. You can use Config to get the current and historical configurations of each Amazon Web Services resource and also to get information about the relationship between the resources. An Amazon Web Services resource can be an Amazon Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance, an Elastic Block Store (EBS) volume, an elastic network Interface (ENI), or a security group. For a complete list of resources currently supported by Config, see Supported Amazon Web Services resources. You can access and manage Config through the Amazon Web Services Management Console, the Amazon Web Services Command Line Interface (Amazon Web Services CLI), the Config API, or the Amazon Web Services SDKs for Config. This reference guide contains documentation for the Config API and the Amazon Web Services CLI commands that you can use to manage Config. The Config API uses the Signature Version 4 protocol for signing requests. For more information about how to sign a request with this protocol, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process. For detailed information about Config features and their associated actions or commands, as well as how to work with Amazon Web Services Management Console, see What Is Config in the Config Developer Guide.

Visual Search Client

microsoft.com
Visual Search API lets you discover insights about an image such as visually similar images, shopping sources, and related searches. The API can also perform text recognition, identify entities (people, places, things), return other topical content for the user to explore, and more. For more information, see Visual Search Overview. NOTE: To comply with the new EU Copyright Directive in France, the Bing Visual Search API must omit some content from certain EU News sources for French users. The removed content may include thumbnail images and videos, video previews, and snippets which accompany search results from these sources. As a consequence, the Bing APIs may serve fewer results with thumbnail images and videos, video previews, and snippets to French users.

Amazon Cognito Identity Provider

Using the Amazon Cognito User Pools API, you can create a user pool to manage directories and users. You can authenticate a user to obtain tokens related to user identity and access policies. This API reference provides information about user pools in Amazon Cognito User Pools. For more information, see the Amazon Cognito Documentation.

AWS CloudTrail

CloudTrail This is the CloudTrail API Reference. It provides descriptions of actions, data types, common parameters, and common errors for CloudTrail. CloudTrail is a web service that records Amazon Web Services API calls for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. The recorded information includes the identity of the user, the start time of the Amazon Web Services API call, the source IP address, the request parameters, and the response elements returned by the service. As an alternative to the API, you can use one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs, which consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .NET, iOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide programmatic access to CloudTrail. For example, the SDKs handle cryptographically signing requests, managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools to Build on Amazon Web Services. See the CloudTrail User Guide for information about the data that is included with each Amazon Web Services API call listed in the log files.

AWS MediaConnect

API for AWS Elemental MediaConnect

Entity Search Client

microsoft.com
The Entity Search API lets you send a search query to Bing and get back search results that include entities and places. Place results include restaurants, hotel, or other local businesses. For places, the query can specify the name of the local business or it can ask for a list (for example, restaurants near me). Entity results include persons, places, or things. Place in this context is tourist attractions, states, countries, etc.