Mock sample for your project: Amazon Simple Workflow Service API

Integrate with "Amazon Simple Workflow Service API" from amazonaws.com in no time with Mockoon's ready to use mock sample

Amazon Simple Workflow Service

amazonaws.com

Version: 2012-01-25


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "Amazon Simple Workflow Service API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
Improve your integration tests by mocking third-party APIs and cover more edge cases: slow response time, random failures, etc.

Description

Amazon Simple Workflow Service The Amazon Simple Workflow Service (Amazon SWF) makes it easy to build applications that use Amazon's cloud to coordinate work across distributed components. In Amazon SWF, a task represents a logical unit of work that is performed by a component of your workflow. Coordinating tasks in a workflow involves managing intertask dependencies, scheduling, and concurrency in accordance with the logical flow of the application. Amazon SWF gives you full control over implementing tasks and coordinating them without worrying about underlying complexities such as tracking their progress and maintaining their state. This documentation serves as reference only. For a broader overview of the Amazon SWF programming model, see the Amazon SWF Developer Guide .

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Amazon Simple Storage Service

Amazon Chime

The Amazon Chime API (application programming interface) is designed for developers to perform key tasks, such as creating and managing Amazon Chime accounts, users, and Voice Connectors. This guide provides detailed information about the Amazon Chime API, including operations, types, inputs and outputs, and error codes. It also includes some server-side API actions to use with the Amazon Chime SDK. For more information about the Amazon Chime SDK, see Using the Amazon Chime SDK in the Amazon Chime Developer Guide. You can use an AWS SDK, the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or the REST API to make API calls. We recommend using an AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Each API operation includes links to information about using it with a language-specific AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Using an AWS SDK You don't need to write code to calculate a signature for request authentication. The SDK clients authenticate your requests by using access keys that you provide. For more information about AWS SDKs, see the AWS Developer Center. Using the AWS CLI Use your access keys with the AWS CLI to make API calls. For information about setting up the AWS CLI, see Installing the AWS Command Line Interface in the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide. For a list of available Amazon Chime commands, see the Amazon Chime commands in the AWS CLI Command Reference. Using REST APIs If you use REST to make API calls, you must authenticate your request by providing a signature. Amazon Chime supports signature version 4. For more information, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process in the Amazon Web Services General Reference. When making REST API calls, use the service name chime and REST endpoint https://service.chime.aws.amazon.com. Administrative permissions are controlled using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM). For more information, see Identity and Access Management for Amazon Chime in the Amazon Chime Administration Guide.

AWS CodeDeploy

AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy is a deployment service that automates application deployments to Amazon EC2 instances, on-premises instances running in your own facility, serverless AWS Lambda functions, or applications in an Amazon ECS service. You can deploy a nearly unlimited variety of application content, such as an updated Lambda function, updated applications in an Amazon ECS service, code, web and configuration files, executables, packages, scripts, multimedia files, and so on. AWS CodeDeploy can deploy application content stored in Amazon S3 buckets, GitHub repositories, or Bitbucket repositories. You do not need to make changes to your existing code before you can use AWS CodeDeploy. AWS CodeDeploy makes it easier for you to rapidly release new features, helps you avoid downtime during application deployment, and handles the complexity of updating your applications, without many of the risks associated with error-prone manual deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Components Use the information in this guide to help you work with the following AWS CodeDeploy components: Application : A name that uniquely identifies the application you want to deploy. AWS CodeDeploy uses this name, which functions as a container, to ensure the correct combination of revision, deployment configuration, and deployment group are referenced during a deployment. Deployment group : A set of individual instances, CodeDeploy Lambda deployment configuration settings, or an Amazon ECS service and network details. A Lambda deployment group specifies how to route traffic to a new version of a Lambda function. An Amazon ECS deployment group specifies the service created in Amazon ECS to deploy, a load balancer, and a listener to reroute production traffic to an updated containerized application. An EC2/On-premises deployment group contains individually tagged instances, Amazon EC2 instances in Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling groups, or both. All deployment groups can specify optional trigger, alarm, and rollback settings. Deployment configuration : A set of deployment rules and deployment success and failure conditions used by AWS CodeDeploy during a deployment. Deployment : The process and the components used when updating a Lambda function, a containerized application in an Amazon ECS service, or of installing content on one or more instances. Application revisions : For an AWS Lambda deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Lambda function to be updated and one or more functions to validate deployment lifecycle events. For an Amazon ECS deployment, this is an AppSpec file that specifies the Amazon ECS task definition, container, and port where production traffic is rerouted. For an EC2/On-premises deployment, this is an archive file that contains source contentβ€”source code, webpages, executable files, and deployment scriptsβ€”along with an AppSpec file. Revisions are stored in Amazon S3 buckets or GitHub repositories. For Amazon S3, a revision is uniquely identified by its Amazon S3 object key and its ETag, version, or both. For GitHub, a revision is uniquely identified by its commit ID. This guide also contains information to help you get details about the instances in your deployments, to make on-premises instances available for AWS CodeDeploy deployments, to get details about a Lambda function deployment, and to get details about Amazon ECS service deployments. AWS CodeDeploy Information Resources AWS CodeDeploy User Guide AWS CodeDeploy API Reference Guide AWS CLI Reference for AWS CodeDeploy AWS CodeDeploy Developer Forum

Amazon Comprehend

Amazon Comprehend is an AWS service for gaining insight into the content of documents. Use these actions to determine the topics contained in your documents, the topics they discuss, the predominant sentiment expressed in them, the predominant language used, and more.

Amazon Interactive Video Service

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

AWS Budgets

The AWS Budgets API enables you to use AWS Budgets to plan your service usage, service costs, and instance reservations. The API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for AWS Budgets. Budgets provide you with a way to see the following information: How close your plan is to your budgeted amount or to the free tier limits Your usage-to-date, including how much you've used of your Reserved Instances (RIs) Your current estimated charges from AWS, and how much your predicted usage will accrue in charges by the end of the month How much of your budget has been used AWS updates your budget status several times a day. Budgets track your unblended costs, subscriptions, refunds, and RIs. You can create the following types of budgets: Cost budgets - Plan how much you want to spend on a service. Usage budgets - Plan how much you want to use one or more services. RI utilization budgets - Define a utilization threshold, and receive alerts when your RI usage falls below that threshold. This lets you see if your RIs are unused or under-utilized. RI coverage budgets - Define a coverage threshold, and receive alerts when the number of your instance hours that are covered by RIs fall below that threshold. This lets you see how much of your instance usage is covered by a reservation. Service Endpoint The AWS Budgets API provides the following endpoint: https://budgets.amazonaws.com For information about costs that are associated with the AWS Budgets API, see AWS Cost Management Pricing.

Amazon Prometheus Service

Amazon Managed Service for Prometheus

Auto Scaling

Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling is designed to automatically launch or terminate EC2 instances based on user-defined scaling policies, scheduled actions, and health checks. For more information about Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling, see the Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling User Guide. For information about granting IAM users required permissions for calls to Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling, see Granting IAM users required permissions for Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling resources in the Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling API Reference.

AWS Fault Injection Simulator

AWS Fault Injection Simulator is a managed service that enables you to perform fault injection experiments on your AWS workloads. For more information, see the AWS Fault Injection Simulator User Guide.

Application Auto Scaling

With Application Auto Scaling, you can configure automatic scaling for the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 fleets Amazon Aurora Replicas Amazon Comprehend document classification and entity recognizer endpoints Amazon DynamoDB tables and global secondary indexes throughput capacity Amazon ECS services Amazon ElastiCache for Redis clusters (replication groups) Amazon EMR clusters Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra) tables Lambda function provisioned concurrency Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka broker storage Amazon SageMaker endpoint variants Spot Fleet (Amazon EC2) requests Custom resources provided by your own applications or services API Summary The Application Auto Scaling service API includes three key sets of actions: Register and manage scalable targets - Register Amazon Web Services or custom resources as scalable targets (a resource that Application Auto Scaling can scale), set minimum and maximum capacity limits, and retrieve information on existing scalable targets. Configure and manage automatic scaling - Define scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources in response to CloudWatch alarms, schedule one-time or recurring scaling actions, and retrieve your recent scaling activity history. Suspend and resume scaling - Temporarily suspend and later resume automatic scaling by calling the RegisterScalableTarget API action for any Application Auto Scaling scalable target. You can suspend and resume (individually or in combination) scale-out activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, scale-in activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, and scheduled scaling. To learn more about Application Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for Application Auto Scaling actions, see the Application Auto Scaling User Guide.
The Amazon Braket API Reference provides information about the operations and structures supported in Amazon Braket.

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights is a service that helps you detect common problems with your applications. It enables you to pinpoint the source of issues in your applications (built with technologies such as Microsoft IIS, .NET, and Microsoft SQL Server), by providing key insights into detected problems. After you onboard your application, CloudWatch Application Insights identifies, recommends, and sets up metrics and logs. It continuously analyzes and correlates your metrics and logs for unusual behavior to surface actionable problems with your application. For example, if your application is slow and unresponsive and leading to HTTP 500 errors in your Application Load Balancer (ALB), Application Insights informs you that a memory pressure problem with your SQL Server database is occurring. It bases this analysis on impactful metrics and log errors.

Other APIs in the same category

HDInsightManagementClient

azure.com
The HDInsight Management Client.

StorageManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Storage Management Client.

AWS Elastic Beanstalk

AWS Elastic Beanstalk AWS Elastic Beanstalk makes it easy for you to create, deploy, and manage scalable, fault-tolerant applications running on the Amazon Web Services cloud. For more information about this product, go to the AWS Elastic Beanstalk details page. The location of the latest AWS Elastic Beanstalk WSDL is https://elasticbeanstalk.s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2010-12-01/AWSElasticBeanstalk.wsdl. To install the Software Development Kits (SDKs), Integrated Development Environment (IDE) Toolkits, and command line tools that enable you to access the API, go to Tools for Amazon Web Services. Endpoints For a list of region-specific endpoints that AWS Elastic Beanstalk supports, go to Regions and Endpoints in the Amazon Web Services Glossary.

Amazon Macie 2

Amazon Macie is a fully managed data security and data privacy service that uses machine learning and pattern matching to discover and protect your sensitive data in AWS. Macie automates the discovery of sensitive data, such as PII and intellectual property, to provide you with insight into the data that your organization stores in AWS. Macie also provides an inventory of your Amazon S3 buckets, which it continually monitors for you. If Macie detects sensitive data or potential data access issues, it generates detailed findings for you to review and act upon as necessary.

AWS Elemental MediaLive

API for AWS Elemental MediaLive

Amazon Elastic Inference

Elastic Inference public APIs.

MonitorManagementClient

azure.com

Azure Machine Learning Model Management Service

azure.com
These APIs allow end users to manage Azure Machine Learning Models, Images, Profiles, and Services.

SqlManagementClient

azure.com
The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.
IoT IoT provides secure, bi-directional communication between Internet-connected devices (such as sensors, actuators, embedded devices, or smart appliances) and the Amazon Web Services cloud. You can discover your custom IoT-Data endpoint to communicate with, configure rules for data processing and integration with other services, organize resources associated with each device (Registry), configure logging, and create and manage policies and credentials to authenticate devices. The service endpoints that expose this API are listed in Amazon Web Services IoT Core Endpoints and Quotas. You must use the endpoint for the region that has the resources you want to access. The service name used by Amazon Web Services Signature Version 4 to sign the request is: execute-api. For more information about how IoT works, see the Developer Guide. For information about how to use the credentials provider for IoT, see Authorizing Direct Calls to Amazon Web Services Services.

Visual Studio Projects Resource Provider Client

azure.com
Use these APIs to manage Visual Studio Team Services resources through the Azure Resource Manager. All task operations conform to the HTTP/1.1 protocol specification and each operation returns an x-ms-request-id header that can be used to obtain information about the request. You must make sure that requests made to these resources are secure. For more information, see https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/rest/api/index.

StreamAnalyticsManagementClient

azure.com