Mock sample for your project: SubscriptionsManagementClient API

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SubscriptionsManagementClient

azure.com

Version: 2015-11-01


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Speed up your application development by using "SubscriptionsManagementClient API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and allow you to stop relying on an external API to get the job done. No more API keys to provision, accesses to configure or unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

The Admin Subscriptions Management Client.

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AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

AWS Proton

This is the AWS Proton Service API Reference. It provides descriptions, syntax and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for the AWS Proton service. The documentation for each action shows the Query API request parameters and the XML response. Alternatively, you can use the AWS CLI to access an API. For more information, see the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide. The AWS Proton service is a two-pronged automation framework. Administrators create service templates to provide standardized infrastructure and deployment tooling for serverless and container based applications. Developers, in turn, select from the available service templates to automate their application or service deployments. Because administrators define the infrastructure and tooling that AWS Proton deploys and manages, they need permissions to use all of the listed API operations. When developers select a specific infrastructure and tooling set, AWS Proton deploys their applications. To monitor their applications that are running on AWS Proton, developers need permissions to the service create, list, update and delete API operations and the service instance list and update API operations. To learn more about AWS Proton administration, see the AWS Proton Administrator Guide. To learn more about deploying serverless and containerized applications on AWS Proton, see the AWS Proton User Guide. Ensuring Idempotency When you make a mutating API request, the request typically returns a result before the asynchronous workflows of the operation are complete. Operations might also time out or encounter other server issues before they're complete, even if the request already returned a result. This might make it difficult to determine whether the request succeeded. Moreover, you might need to retry the request multiple times to ensure that the operation completes successfully. However, if the original request and the subsequent retries are successful, the operation occurs multiple times. This means that you might create more resources than you intended. Idempotency ensures that an API request action completes no more than one time. With an idempotent request, if the original request action completes successfully, any subsequent retries complete successfully without performing any further actions. However, the result might contain updated information, such as the current creation status. The following lists of APIs are grouped according to methods that ensure idempotency. Idempotent create APIs with a client token The API actions in this list support idempotency with the use of a client token. The corresponding AWS CLI commands also support idempotency using a client token. A client token is a unique, case-sensitive string of up to 64 ASCII characters. To make an idempotent API request using one of these actions, specify a client token in the request. We recommend that you don't reuse the same client token for other API requests. If you don’t provide a client token for these APIs, a default client token is automatically provided by SDKs. Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request using the same client token and the same parameters, the retry succeeds without performing any further actions other than returning the original resource detail data in the response. If you retry the request using the same client token, but one or more of the parameters are different, the retry throws a ValidationException with an IdempotentParameterMismatch error. Client tokens expire eight hours after a request is made. If you retry the request with the expired token, a new resource is created. If the original resource is deleted and you retry the request, a new resource is created. Idempotent create APIs with a client token: CreateEnvironmentTemplateVersion CreateServiceTemplateVersion CreateEnvironmentAccountConnection Idempotent create APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request with an API from this group, and the original resource hasn't been modified, the retry succeeds without performing any further actions other than returning the original resource detail data in the response. If the original resource has been modified, the retry throws a ConflictException. If you retry with different input parameters, the retry throws a ValidationException with an IdempotentParameterMismatch error. Idempotent create APIs: CreateEnvironmentTemplate CreateServiceTemplate CreateEnvironment CreateService Idempotent delete APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: When you retry the request with an API from this group and the resource was deleted, its metadata is returned in the response. If you retry and the resource doesn't exist, the response is empty. In both cases, the retry succeeds. Idempotent delete APIs: DeleteEnvironmentTemplate DeleteEnvironmentTemplateVersion DeleteServiceTemplate DeleteServiceTemplateVersion DeleteEnvironmentAccountConnection Asynchronous idempotent delete APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request with an API from this group, if the original request delete operation status is DELETEINPROGRESS, the retry returns the resource detail data in the response without performing any further actions. If the original request delete operation is complete, a retry returns an empty response. Asynchronous idempotent delete APIs: DeleteEnvironment DeleteService

AWS Backup

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AWS Server Migration Service

AWS Server Migration Service AWS Server Migration Service (AWS SMS) makes it easier and faster for you to migrate your on-premises workloads to AWS. To learn more about AWS SMS, see the following resources: AWS Server Migration Service product page AWS Server Migration Service User Guide

Amazon Connect Service

Amazon Connect is a cloud-based contact center solution that you use to set up and manage a customer contact center and provide reliable customer engagement at any scale. Amazon Connect provides metrics and real-time reporting that enable you to optimize contact routing. You can also resolve customer issues more efficiently by getting customers in touch with the appropriate agents. There are limits to the number of Amazon Connect resources that you can create. There are also limits to the number of requests that you can make per second. For more information, see Amazon Connect Service Quotas in the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide. You can connect programmatically to an AWS service by using an endpoint. For a list of Amazon Connect endpoints, see Amazon Connect Endpoints. Working with contact flows? Check out the Amazon Connect Flow language.

Amazon Relational Database Service

Amazon Relational Database Service Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud. It provides cost-efficient, resizeable capacity for an industry-standard relational database and manages common database administration tasks, freeing up developers to focus on what makes their applications and businesses unique. Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, or Amazon Aurora database server. These capabilities mean that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases work with Amazon RDS without modification. Amazon RDS automatically backs up your database and maintains the database software that powers your DB instance. Amazon RDS is flexible: you can scale your DB instance's compute resources and storage capacity to meet your application's demand. As with all Amazon Web Services, there are no up-front investments, and you pay only for the resources you use. This interface reference for Amazon RDS contains documentation for a programming or command line interface you can use to manage Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS is asynchronous, which means that some interfaces might require techniques such as polling or callback functions to determine when a command has been applied. In this reference, the parameter descriptions indicate whether a command is applied immediately, on the next instance reboot, or during the maintenance window. The reference structure is as follows, and we list following some related topics from the user guide. Amazon RDS API Reference For the alphabetical list of API actions, see API Actions. For the alphabetical list of data types, see Data Types. For a list of common query parameters, see Common Parameters. For descriptions of the error codes, see Common Errors. Amazon RDS User Guide For a summary of the Amazon RDS interfaces, see Available RDS Interfaces. For more information about how to use the Query API, see Using the Query API.

Redshift Data API Service

You can use the Amazon Redshift Data API to run queries on Amazon Redshift tables. You can run SQL statements, which are committed if the statement succeeds. For more information about the Amazon Redshift Data API, see Using the Amazon Redshift Data API in the Amazon Redshift Cluster Management Guide.

AWS Secrets Manager

Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager provides a service to enable you to store, manage, and retrieve, secrets. This guide provides descriptions of the Secrets Manager API. For more information about using this service, see the Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager User Guide. API Version This version of the Secrets Manager API Reference documents the Secrets Manager API version 2017-10-17. As an alternative to using the API, you can use one of the Amazon Web Services SDKs, which consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms such as Java, Ruby, .NET, iOS, and Android. The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager. For example, the SDKs provide cryptographically signing requests, managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including downloading and installing them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services. We recommend you use the Amazon Web Services SDKs to make programmatic API calls to Secrets Manager. However, you also can use the Secrets Manager HTTP Query API to make direct calls to the Secrets Manager web service. To learn more about the Secrets Manager HTTP Query API, see Making Query Requests in the Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager User Guide. Secrets Manager API supports GET and POST requests for all actions, and doesn't require you to use GET for some actions and POST for others. However, GET requests are subject to the limitation size of a URL. Therefore, for operations that require larger sizes, use a POST request. Support and Feedback for Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager We welcome your feedback. Send your comments to [email protected], or post your feedback and questions in the Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager Discussion Forum. For more information about the Amazon Web Services Discussion Forums, see Forums Help. How examples are presented The JSON that Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager expects as your request parameters and the service returns as a response to HTTP query requests contain single, long strings without line breaks or white space formatting. The JSON shown in the examples displays the code formatted with both line breaks and white space to improve readability. When example input parameters can also cause long strings extending beyond the screen, you can insert line breaks to enhance readability. You should always submit the input as a single JSON text string. Logging API Requests Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager supports Amazon Web Services CloudTrail, a service that records Amazon Web Services API calls for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. By using information that's collected by Amazon Web Services CloudTrail, you can determine the requests successfully made to Secrets Manager, who made the request, when it was made, and so on. For more about Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager and support for Amazon Web Services CloudTrail, see Logging Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager Events with Amazon Web Services CloudTrail in the Amazon Web Services Secrets Manager User Guide. To learn more about CloudTrail, including enabling it and find your log files, see the Amazon Web Services CloudTrail User Guide.

Amazon Polly

Amazon Polly is a web service that makes it easy to synthesize speech from text. The Amazon Polly service provides API operations for synthesizing high-quality speech from plain text and Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML), along with managing pronunciations lexicons that enable you to get the best results for your application domain.

AWS OpsWorks CM

AWS OpsWorks CM AWS OpsWorks for configuration management (CM) is a service that runs and manages configuration management servers. You can use AWS OpsWorks CM to create and manage AWS OpsWorks for Chef Automate and AWS OpsWorks for Puppet Enterprise servers, and add or remove nodes for the servers to manage. Glossary of terms Server : A configuration management server that can be highly-available. The configuration management server runs on an Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instance, and may use various other AWS services, such as Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) and Elastic Load Balancing. A server is a generic abstraction over the configuration manager that you want to use, much like Amazon RDS. In AWS OpsWorks CM, you do not start or stop servers. After you create servers, they continue to run until they are deleted. Engine : The engine is the specific configuration manager that you want to use. Valid values in this release include ChefAutomate and Puppet. Backup : This is an application-level backup of the data that the configuration manager stores. AWS OpsWorks CM creates an S3 bucket for backups when you launch the first server. A backup maintains a snapshot of a server's configuration-related attributes at the time the backup starts. Events : Events are always related to a server. Events are written during server creation, when health checks run, when backups are created, when system maintenance is performed, etc. When you delete a server, the server's events are also deleted. Account attributes : Every account has attributes that are assigned in the AWS OpsWorks CM database. These attributes store information about configuration limits (servers, backups, etc.) and your customer account. Endpoints AWS OpsWorks CM supports the following endpoints, all HTTPS. You must connect to one of the following endpoints. Your servers can only be accessed or managed within the endpoint in which they are created. opsworks-cm.us-east-1.amazonaws.com opsworks-cm.us-east-2.amazonaws.com opsworks-cm.us-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks-cm.us-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks-cm.ap-northeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks-cm.ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks-cm.ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks-cm.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com opsworks-cm.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com For more information, see AWS OpsWorks endpoints and quotas in the AWS General Reference. Throttling limits All API operations allow for five requests per second with a burst of 10 requests per second.

portal

azure.com
Allows creation and deletion of Azure Shared Dashboards.