Mock sample for your project: AWS Elastic Beanstalk API

Integrate with "AWS Elastic Beanstalk API" from amazonaws.com in no time with Mockoon's ready to use mock sample

AWS Elastic Beanstalk

amazonaws.com

Version: 2010-12-01


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "AWS Elastic Beanstalk API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs: no more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, etc.

Description

AWS Elastic Beanstalk AWS Elastic Beanstalk makes it easy for you to create, deploy, and manage scalable, fault-tolerant applications running on the Amazon Web Services cloud. For more information about this product, go to the AWS Elastic Beanstalk details page. The location of the latest AWS Elastic Beanstalk WSDL is https://elasticbeanstalk.s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2010-12-01/AWSElasticBeanstalk.wsdl. To install the Software Development Kits (SDKs), Integrated Development Environment (IDE) Toolkits, and command line tools that enable you to access the API, go to Tools for Amazon Web Services. Endpoints For a list of region-specific endpoints that AWS Elastic Beanstalk supports, go to Regions and Endpoints in the Amazon Web Services Glossary.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Ground Station

Welcome to the AWS Ground Station API Reference. AWS Ground Station is a fully managed service that enables you to control satellite communications, downlink and process satellite data, and scale your satellite operations efficiently and cost-effectively without having to build or manage your own ground station infrastructure.

Amazon Prometheus Service

Amazon Managed Service for Prometheus

AWS License Manager

AWS License Manager AWS License Manager makes it easier to manage licenses from software vendors across multiple AWS accounts and on-premises servers.

Amazon Lex Runtime Service

Amazon Lex provides both build and runtime endpoints. Each endpoint provides a set of operations (API). Your conversational bot uses the runtime API to understand user utterances (user input text or voice). For example, suppose a user says "I want pizza", your bot sends this input to Amazon Lex using the runtime API. Amazon Lex recognizes that the user request is for the OrderPizza intent (one of the intents defined in the bot). Then Amazon Lex engages in user conversation on behalf of the bot to elicit required information (slot values, such as pizza size and crust type), and then performs fulfillment activity (that you configured when you created the bot). You use the build-time API to create and manage your Amazon Lex bot. For a list of build-time operations, see the build-time API, .

Amazon WorkSpaces

Amazon WorkSpaces Service Amazon WorkSpaces enables you to provision virtual, cloud-based Microsoft Windows and Amazon Linux desktops for your users.

AWS Batch

Batch Using Batch, you can run batch computing workloads on the Cloud. Batch computing is a common means for developers, scientists, and engineers to access large amounts of compute resources. Batch uses the advantages of this computing workload to remove the undifferentiated heavy lifting of configuring and managing required infrastructure. At the same time, it also adopts a familiar batch computing software approach. Given these advantages, Batch can help you to efficiently provision resources in response to jobs submitted, thus effectively helping you to eliminate capacity constraints, reduce compute costs, and deliver your results more quickly. As a fully managed service, Batch can run batch computing workloads of any scale. Batch automatically provisions compute resources and optimizes workload distribution based on the quantity and scale of your specific workloads. With Batch, there's no need to install or manage batch computing software. This means that you can focus your time and energy on analyzing results and solving your specific problems.

Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX)

DAX is a managed caching service engineered for Amazon DynamoDB. DAX dramatically speeds up database reads by caching frequently-accessed data from DynamoDB, so applications can access that data with sub-millisecond latency. You can create a DAX cluster easily, using the AWS Management Console. With a few simple modifications to your code, your application can begin taking advantage of the DAX cluster and realize significant improvements in read performance.

Amazon Augmented AI Runtime

Amazon Augmented AI (Amazon A2I) adds the benefit of human judgment to any machine learning application. When an AI application can't evaluate data with a high degree of confidence, human reviewers can take over. This human review is called a human review workflow. To create and start a human review workflow, you need three resources: a worker task template, a flow definition, and a human loop. For information about these resources and prerequisites for using Amazon A2I, see Get Started with Amazon Augmented AI in the Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide. This API reference includes information about API actions and data types that you can use to interact with Amazon A2I programmatically. Use this guide to: Start a human loop with the StartHumanLoop operation when using Amazon A2I with a custom task type. To learn more about the difference between custom and built-in task types, see Use Task Types. To learn how to start a human loop using this API, see Create and Start a Human Loop for a Custom Task Type in the Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide. Manage your human loops. You can list all human loops that you have created, describe individual human loops, and stop and delete human loops. To learn more, see Monitor and Manage Your Human Loop in the Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide. Amazon A2I integrates APIs from various AWS services to create and start human review workflows for those services. To learn how Amazon A2I uses these APIs, see Use APIs in Amazon A2I in the Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide.

AWS CodeBuild

CodeBuild CodeBuild is a fully managed build service in the cloud. CodeBuild compiles your source code, runs unit tests, and produces artifacts that are ready to deploy. CodeBuild eliminates the need to provision, manage, and scale your own build servers. It provides prepackaged build environments for the most popular programming languages and build tools, such as Apache Maven, Gradle, and more. You can also fully customize build environments in CodeBuild to use your own build tools. CodeBuild scales automatically to meet peak build requests. You pay only for the build time you consume. For more information about CodeBuild, see the CodeBuild User Guide.

AWS WAF Regional

This is AWS WAF Classic Regional documentation. For more information, see AWS WAF Classic in the developer guide. For the latest version of AWS WAF, use the AWS WAFV2 API and see the AWS WAF Developer Guide. With the latest version, AWS WAF has a single set of endpoints for regional and global use. This is the AWS WAF Regional Classic API Reference for using AWS WAF Classic with the AWS resources, Elastic Load Balancing (ELB) Application Load Balancers and API Gateway APIs. The AWS WAF Classic actions and data types listed in the reference are available for protecting Elastic Load Balancing (ELB) Application Load Balancers and API Gateway APIs. You can use these actions and data types by means of the endpoints listed in AWS Regions and Endpoints. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the AWS WAF Classic API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about AWS WAF Classic features and an overview of how to use the AWS WAF Classic API, see the AWS WAF Classic in the developer guide.

Amazon Route 53 Resolver

When you create a VPC using Amazon VPC, you automatically get DNS resolution within the VPC from Route 53 Resolver. By default, Resolver answers DNS queries for VPC domain names such as domain names for EC2 instances or Elastic Load Balancing load balancers. Resolver performs recursive lookups against public name servers for all other domain names. You can also configure DNS resolution between your VPC and your network over a Direct Connect or VPN connection: Forward DNS queries from resolvers on your network to Route 53 Resolver DNS resolvers on your network can forward DNS queries to Resolver in a specified VPC. This allows your DNS resolvers to easily resolve domain names for Amazon Web Services resources such as EC2 instances or records in a Route 53 private hosted zone. For more information, see How DNS Resolvers on Your Network Forward DNS Queries to Route 53 Resolver in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. Conditionally forward queries from a VPC to resolvers on your network You can configure Resolver to forward queries that it receives from EC2 instances in your VPCs to DNS resolvers on your network. To forward selected queries, you create Resolver rules that specify the domain names for the DNS queries that you want to forward (such as example.com), and the IP addresses of the DNS resolvers on your network that you want to forward the queries to. If a query matches multiple rules (example.com, acme.example.com), Resolver chooses the rule with the most specific match (acme.example.com) and forwards the query to the IP addresses that you specified in that rule. For more information, see How Route 53 Resolver Forwards DNS Queries from Your VPCs to Your Network in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. Like Amazon VPC, Resolver is Regional. In each Region where you have VPCs, you can choose whether to forward queries from your VPCs to your network (outbound queries), from your network to your VPCs (inbound queries), or both.

AmplifyBackend

AWS Amplify Admin API

Other APIs in the same category

Management Groups

azure.com
The Azure Management Groups API enables consolidation of multiple
subscriptions/resources into an organizational hierarchy and centrally
manage access control, policies, alerting and reporting for those resources.

Amazon EC2 Container Registry

Amazon Elastic Container Registry Amazon Elastic Container Registry (Amazon ECR) is a managed container image registry service. Customers can use the familiar Docker CLI, or their preferred client, to push, pull, and manage images. Amazon ECR provides a secure, scalable, and reliable registry for your Docker or Open Container Initiative (OCI) images. Amazon ECR supports private repositories with resource-based permissions using IAM so that specific users or Amazon EC2 instances can access repositories and images. Amazon ECR has service endpoints in each supported Region. For more information, see Amazon ECR endpoints in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations to retrieve Products by Tags in Azure API Management deployment.

UpdateAdminClient

azure.com
The Update Admin Management Client.

FabricAdminClient

azure.com
Fabric location operation endpoints and objects.

GalleryManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Gallery Management Client.

AWS Step Functions

AWS Step Functions AWS Step Functions is a service that lets you coordinate the components of distributed applications and microservices using visual workflows. You can use Step Functions to build applications from individual components, each of which performs a discrete function, or task, allowing you to scale and change applications quickly. Step Functions provides a console that helps visualize the components of your application as a series of steps. Step Functions automatically triggers and tracks each step, and retries steps when there are errors, so your application executes predictably and in the right order every time. Step Functions logs the state of each step, so you can quickly diagnose and debug any issues. Step Functions manages operations and underlying infrastructure to ensure your application is available at any scale. You can run tasks on AWS, your own servers, or any system that has access to AWS. You can access and use Step Functions using the console, the AWS SDKs, or an HTTP API. For more information about Step Functions, see the AWS Step Functions Developer Guide .

AWS Migration Hub

The AWS Migration Hub API methods help to obtain server and application migration status and integrate your resource-specific migration tool by providing a programmatic interface to Migration Hub. Remember that you must set your AWS Migration Hub home region before you call any of these APIs, or a HomeRegionNotSetException error will be returned. Also, you must make the API calls while in your home region.

AmplifyBackend

AWS Amplify Admin API

AmazonApiGatewayManagementApi

The Amazon API Gateway Management API allows you to directly manage runtime aspects of your deployed APIs. To use it, you must explicitly set the SDK's endpoint to point to the endpoint of your deployed API. The endpoint will be of the form https://{api-id}.execute-api.{region}.amazonaws.com/{stage}, or will be the endpoint corresponding to your API's custom domain and base path, if applicable.

AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

SubscriptionsManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Subscriptions Management Client.