Mock sample for your project: Provider API Client

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Provider API Client

azure.com

Version: 2019-08-01


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "Provider API Client" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

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AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

Amazon Relational Database Service

Amazon Relational Database Service Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud. It provides cost-efficient, resizeable capacity for an industry-standard relational database and manages common database administration tasks, freeing up developers to focus on what makes their applications and businesses unique. Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, or Amazon Aurora database server. These capabilities mean that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases work with Amazon RDS without modification. Amazon RDS automatically backs up your database and maintains the database software that powers your DB instance. Amazon RDS is flexible: you can scale your DB instance's compute resources and storage capacity to meet your application's demand. As with all Amazon Web Services, there are no up-front investments, and you pay only for the resources you use. This interface reference for Amazon RDS contains documentation for a programming or command line interface you can use to manage Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS is asynchronous, which means that some interfaces might require techniques such as polling or callback functions to determine when a command has been applied. In this reference, the parameter descriptions indicate whether a command is applied immediately, on the next instance reboot, or during the maintenance window. The reference structure is as follows, and we list following some related topics from the user guide. Amazon RDS API Reference For the alphabetical list of API actions, see API Actions. For the alphabetical list of data types, see Data Types. For a list of common query parameters, see Common Parameters. For descriptions of the error codes, see Common Errors. Amazon RDS User Guide For a summary of the Amazon RDS interfaces, see Available RDS Interfaces. For more information about how to use the Query API, see Using the Query API.

Amazon AppStream

Amazon AppStream 2.0 This is the Amazon AppStream 2.0 API Reference. This documentation provides descriptions and syntax for each of the actions and data types in AppStream 2.0. AppStream 2.0 is a fully managed, secure application streaming service that lets you stream desktop applications to users without rewriting applications. AppStream 2.0 manages the AWS resources that are required to host and run your applications, scales automatically, and provides access to your users on demand. You can call the AppStream 2.0 API operations by using an interface VPC endpoint (interface endpoint). For more information, see Access AppStream 2.0 API Operations and CLI Commands Through an Interface VPC Endpoint in the Amazon AppStream 2.0 Administration Guide. To learn more about AppStream 2.0, see the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 product page Amazon AppStream 2.0 documentation

Amazon Neptune

Amazon Neptune Amazon Neptune is a fast, reliable, fully-managed graph database service that makes it easy to build and run applications that work with highly connected datasets. The core of Amazon Neptune is a purpose-built, high-performance graph database engine optimized for storing billions of relationships and querying the graph with milliseconds latency. Amazon Neptune supports popular graph models Property Graph and W3C's RDF, and their respective query languages Apache TinkerPop Gremlin and SPARQL, allowing you to easily build queries that efficiently navigate highly connected datasets. Neptune powers graph use cases such as recommendation engines, fraud detection, knowledge graphs, drug discovery, and network security. This interface reference for Amazon Neptune contains documentation for a programming or command line interface you can use to manage Amazon Neptune. Note that Amazon Neptune is asynchronous, which means that some interfaces might require techniques such as polling or callback functions to determine when a command has been applied. In this reference, the parameter descriptions indicate whether a command is applied immediately, on the next instance reboot, or during the maintenance window. The reference structure is as follows, and we list following some related topics from the user guide.

AWS Mobile

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Amazon Augmented AI Runtime

Amazon Augmented AI (Amazon A2I) adds the benefit of human judgment to any machine learning application. When an AI application can't evaluate data with a high degree of confidence, human reviewers can take over. This human review is called a human review workflow. To create and start a human review workflow, you need three resources: a worker task template, a flow definition, and a human loop. For information about these resources and prerequisites for using Amazon A2I, see Get Started with Amazon Augmented AI in the Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide. This API reference includes information about API actions and data types that you can use to interact with Amazon A2I programmatically. Use this guide to: Start a human loop with the StartHumanLoop operation when using Amazon A2I with a custom task type. To learn more about the difference between custom and built-in task types, see Use Task Types. To learn how to start a human loop using this API, see Create and Start a Human Loop for a Custom Task Type in the Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide. Manage your human loops. You can list all human loops that you have created, describe individual human loops, and stop and delete human loops. To learn more, see Monitor and Manage Your Human Loop in the Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide. Amazon A2I integrates APIs from various AWS services to create and start human review workflows for those services. To learn how Amazon A2I uses these APIs, see Use APIs in Amazon A2I in the Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide.

Amazon Data Lifecycle Manager

Amazon Data Lifecycle Manager With Amazon Data Lifecycle Manager, you can manage the lifecycle of your Amazon Web Services resources. You create lifecycle policies, which are used to automate operations on the specified resources. Amazon DLM supports Amazon EBS volumes and snapshots. For information about using Amazon DLM with Amazon EBS, see Automating the Amazon EBS Snapshot Lifecycle in the Amazon EC2 User Guide.

AWS IoT 1-Click Devices Service

Describes all of the AWS IoT 1-Click device-related API operations for the service.
Also provides sample requests, responses, and errors for the supported web services
protocols.

Amazon Cognito Sync

Amazon Cognito Sync Amazon Cognito Sync provides an AWS service and client library that enable cross-device syncing of application-related user data. High-level client libraries are available for both iOS and Android. You can use these libraries to persist data locally so that it's available even if the device is offline. Developer credentials don't need to be stored on the mobile device to access the service. You can use Amazon Cognito to obtain a normalized user ID and credentials. User data is persisted in a dataset that can store up to 1 MB of key-value pairs, and you can have up to 20 datasets per user identity. With Amazon Cognito Sync, the data stored for each identity is accessible only to credentials assigned to that identity. In order to use the Cognito Sync service, you need to make API calls using credentials retrieved with Amazon Cognito Identity service. If you want to use Cognito Sync in an Android or iOS application, you will probably want to make API calls via the AWS Mobile SDK. To learn more, see the Developer Guide for Android and the Developer Guide for iOS.

Amazon Forecast Service

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AWS Data Pipeline

AWS Data Pipeline configures and manages a data-driven workflow called a pipeline. AWS Data Pipeline handles the details of scheduling and ensuring that data dependencies are met so that your application can focus on processing the data. AWS Data Pipeline provides a JAR implementation of a task runner called AWS Data Pipeline Task Runner. AWS Data Pipeline Task Runner provides logic for common data management scenarios, such as performing database queries and running data analysis using Amazon Elastic MapReduce (Amazon EMR). You can use AWS Data Pipeline Task Runner as your task runner, or you can write your own task runner to provide custom data management. AWS Data Pipeline implements two main sets of functionality. Use the first set to create a pipeline and define data sources, schedules, dependencies, and the transforms to be performed on the data. Use the second set in your task runner application to receive the next task ready for processing. The logic for performing the task, such as querying the data, running data analysis, or converting the data from one format to another, is contained within the task runner. The task runner performs the task assigned to it by the web service, reporting progress to the web service as it does so. When the task is done, the task runner reports the final success or failure of the task to the web service.