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AWS Identity and Access Management

amazonaws.com

Version: 2010-05-08


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Description

Identity and Access Management Identity and Access Management (IAM) is a web service for securely controlling access to Amazon Web Services services. With IAM, you can centrally manage users, security credentials such as access keys, and permissions that control which Amazon Web Services resources users and applications can access. For more information about IAM, see Identity and Access Management (IAM) and the Identity and Access Management User Guide.

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Amazon Personalize

Amazon Personalize is a machine learning service that makes it easy to add individualized recommendations to customers.

AWS CodeCommit

AWS CodeCommit This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects: Repositories, by calling the following: BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account. CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository. DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository. GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository. ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account. UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository. UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository can access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use. Branches, by calling the following: CreateBranch, which creates a branch in a specified repository. DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch. GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch. ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository. UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository. Files, by calling the following: DeleteFile, which deletes the content of a specified file from a specified branch. GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object in a repository. GetFile, which returns the base-64 encoded content of a specified file. GetFolder, which returns the contents of a specified folder or directory. PutFile, which adds or modifies a single file in a specified repository and branch. Commits, by calling the following: BatchGetCommits, which returns information about one or more commits in a repository. CreateCommit, which creates a commit for changes to a repository. GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information. GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID, or other fully qualified reference). Merges, by calling the following: BatchDescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about conflicts in a merge between commits in a repository. CreateUnreferencedMergeCommit, which creates an unreferenced commit between two branches or commits for the purpose of comparing them and identifying any potential conflicts. DescribeMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the base, source, and destination versions of a file in a potential merge. GetMergeCommit, which returns information about the merge between a source and destination commit. GetMergeConflicts, which returns information about merge conflicts between the source and destination branch in a pull request. GetMergeOptions, which returns information about the available merge options between two branches or commit specifiers. MergeBranchesByFastForward, which merges two branches using the fast-forward merge option. MergeBranchesBySquash, which merges two branches using the squash merge option. MergeBranchesByThreeWay, which merges two branches using the three-way merge option. Pull requests, by calling the following: CreatePullRequest, which creates a pull request in a specified repository. CreatePullRequestApprovalRule, which creates an approval rule for a specified pull request. DeletePullRequestApprovalRule, which deletes an approval rule for a specified pull request. DescribePullRequestEvents, which returns information about one or more pull request events. EvaluatePullRequestApprovalRules, which evaluates whether a pull request has met all the conditions specified in its associated approval rules. GetCommentsForPullRequest, which returns information about comments on a specified pull request. GetPullRequest, which returns information about a specified pull request. GetPullRequestApprovalStates, which returns information about the approval states for a specified pull request. GetPullRequestOverrideState, which returns information about whether approval rules have been set aside (overriden) for a pull request, and if so, the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the user or identity that overrode the rules and their requirements for the pull request. ListPullRequests, which lists all pull requests for a repository. MergePullRequestByFastForward, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the fast-forward merge option. MergePullRequestBySquash, which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the squash merge option. MergePullRequestByThreeWay. which merges the source destination branch of a pull request into the specified destination branch for that pull request using the three-way merge option. OverridePullRequestApprovalRules, which sets aside all approval rule requirements for a pull request. PostCommentForPullRequest, which posts a comment to a pull request at the specified line, file, or request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalRuleContent, which updates the structure of an approval rule for a pull request. UpdatePullRequestApprovalState, which updates the state of an approval on a pull request. UpdatePullRequestDescription, which updates the description of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestStatus, which updates the status of a pull request. UpdatePullRequestTitle, which updates the title of a pull request. Approval rule templates, by calling the following: AssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepository, which associates a template with a specified repository. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repository. BatchAssociateApprovalRuleTemplateWithRepositories, which associates a template with one or more specified repositories. After the template is associated with a repository, AWS CodeCommit creates approval rules that match the template conditions on every pull request created in the specified repositories. BatchDisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepositories, which removes the association between a template and specified repositories so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in those repositories. CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. ListRepositoriesForApprovalRuleTemplate, which lists all repositories associated with the specified approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateDescription, which updates the description of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateName, which updates the name of an approval rule template. UpdateApprovalRuleTemplateContent, which updates the content of an approval rule template. Comments in a repository, by calling the following: DeleteCommentContent, which deletes the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. GetComment, which returns information about a comment on a commit. GetCommentReactions, which returns information about emoji reactions to comments. GetCommentsForComparedCommit, which returns information about comments on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentForComparedCommit, which creates a comment on the comparison between two commit specifiers in a repository. PostCommentReply, which creates a reply to a comment. PutCommentReaction, which creates or updates an emoji reaction to a comment. UpdateComment, which updates the content of a comment on a commit in a repository. Tags used to tag resources in AWS CodeCommit (not Git tags), by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeCommit. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeCommit. Triggers, by calling the following: GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository. PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers. TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target. For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

AWS IoT Fleet Hub

With Fleet Hub for AWS IoT Device Management you can build stand-alone web applications for monitoring the health of your device fleets. Fleet Hub for AWS IoT Device Management is in public preview and is subject to change.

AWS CodeStar connections

AWS CodeStar Connections This AWS CodeStar Connections API Reference provides descriptions and usage examples of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar Connections API. You can use the connections API to work with connections and installations. Connections are configurations that you use to connect AWS resources to external code repositories. Each connection is a resource that can be given to services such as CodePipeline to connect to a third-party repository such as Bitbucket. For example, you can add the connection in CodePipeline so that it triggers your pipeline when a code change is made to your third-party code repository. Each connection is named and associated with a unique ARN that is used to reference the connection. When you create a connection, the console initiates a third-party connection handshake. Installations are the apps that are used to conduct this handshake. For example, the installation for the Bitbucket provider type is the Bitbucket app. When you create a connection, you can choose an existing installation or create one. When you want to create a connection to an installed provider type such as GitHub Enterprise Server, you create a host for your connections. You can work with connections by calling: CreateConnection, which creates a uniquely named connection that can be referenced by services such as CodePipeline. DeleteConnection, which deletes the specified connection. GetConnection, which returns information about the connection, including the connection status. ListConnections, which lists the connections associated with your account. You can work with hosts by calling: CreateHost, which creates a host that represents the infrastructure where your provider is installed. DeleteHost, which deletes the specified host. GetHost, which returns information about the host, including the setup status. ListHosts, which lists the hosts associated with your account. You can work with tags in AWS CodeStar Connections by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeStar Connections. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeStar Connections. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeStar Connections. For information about how to use AWS CodeStar Connections, see the Developer Tools User Guide.

AWS Batch

Batch Using Batch, you can run batch computing workloads on the Cloud. Batch computing is a common means for developers, scientists, and engineers to access large amounts of compute resources. Batch uses the advantages of this computing workload to remove the undifferentiated heavy lifting of configuring and managing required infrastructure. At the same time, it also adopts a familiar batch computing software approach. Given these advantages, Batch can help you to efficiently provision resources in response to jobs submitted, thus effectively helping you to eliminate capacity constraints, reduce compute costs, and deliver your results more quickly. As a fully managed service, Batch can run batch computing workloads of any scale. Batch automatically provisions compute resources and optimizes workload distribution based on the quantity and scale of your specific workloads. With Batch, there's no need to install or manage batch computing software. This means that you can focus your time and energy on analyzing results and solving your specific problems.

AmazonApiGatewayManagementApi

The Amazon API Gateway Management API allows you to directly manage runtime aspects of your deployed APIs. To use it, you must explicitly set the SDK's endpoint to point to the endpoint of your deployed API. The endpoint will be of the form https://{api-id}.execute-api.{region}.amazonaws.com/{stage}, or will be the endpoint corresponding to your API's custom domain and base path, if applicable.

Amazon Chime

The Amazon Chime API (application programming interface) is designed for developers to perform key tasks, such as creating and managing Amazon Chime accounts, users, and Voice Connectors. This guide provides detailed information about the Amazon Chime API, including operations, types, inputs and outputs, and error codes. It also includes some server-side API actions to use with the Amazon Chime SDK. For more information about the Amazon Chime SDK, see Using the Amazon Chime SDK in the Amazon Chime Developer Guide. You can use an AWS SDK, the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or the REST API to make API calls. We recommend using an AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Each API operation includes links to information about using it with a language-specific AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Using an AWS SDK You don't need to write code to calculate a signature for request authentication. The SDK clients authenticate your requests by using access keys that you provide. For more information about AWS SDKs, see the AWS Developer Center. Using the AWS CLI Use your access keys with the AWS CLI to make API calls. For information about setting up the AWS CLI, see Installing the AWS Command Line Interface in the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide. For a list of available Amazon Chime commands, see the Amazon Chime commands in the AWS CLI Command Reference. Using REST APIs If you use REST to make API calls, you must authenticate your request by providing a signature. Amazon Chime supports signature version 4. For more information, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process in the Amazon Web Services General Reference. When making REST API calls, use the service name chime and REST endpoint https://service.chime.aws.amazon.com. Administrative permissions are controlled using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM). For more information, see Identity and Access Management for Amazon Chime in the Amazon Chime Administration Guide.

Access Analyzer

Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer helps identify potential resource-access risks by enabling you to identify any policies that grant access to an external principal. It does this by using logic-based reasoning to analyze resource-based policies in your Amazon Web Services environment. An external principal can be another Amazon Web Services account, a root user, an IAM user or role, a federated user, an Amazon Web Services service, or an anonymous user. You can also use IAM Access Analyzer to preview and validate public and cross-account access to your resources before deploying permissions changes. This guide describes the Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about IAM Access Analyzer, see Identity and Access Management Access Analyzer in the IAM User Guide. To start using IAM Access Analyzer, you first need to create an analyzer.

Elastic Load Balancing

Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer can distribute incoming traffic across your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered instances and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy instances. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer and a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the instances. Elastic Load Balancing supports three types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. You can select a load balancer based on your application needs. For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. This reference covers the 2012-06-01 API, which supports Classic Load Balancers. The 2015-12-01 API supports Application Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers. To get started, create a load balancer with one or more listeners using CreateLoadBalancer. Register your instances with the load balancer using RegisterInstancesWithLoadBalancer. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds with a 200 OK response code.

Amazon Fraud Detector

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AWS IoT Events Data

AWS IoT Events monitors your equipment or device fleets for failures or changes in operation, and triggers actions when such events occur. You can use AWS IoT Events Data API commands to send inputs to detectors, list detectors, and view or update a detector's status. For more information, see What is AWS IoT Events? in the AWS IoT Events Developer Guide.

Application Auto Scaling

With Application Auto Scaling, you can configure automatic scaling for the following resources: Amazon AppStream 2.0 fleets Amazon Aurora Replicas Amazon Comprehend document classification and entity recognizer endpoints Amazon DynamoDB tables and global secondary indexes throughput capacity Amazon ECS services Amazon ElastiCache for Redis clusters (replication groups) Amazon EMR clusters Amazon Keyspaces (for Apache Cassandra) tables Lambda function provisioned concurrency Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka broker storage Amazon SageMaker endpoint variants Spot Fleet (Amazon EC2) requests Custom resources provided by your own applications or services API Summary The Application Auto Scaling service API includes three key sets of actions: Register and manage scalable targets - Register Amazon Web Services or custom resources as scalable targets (a resource that Application Auto Scaling can scale), set minimum and maximum capacity limits, and retrieve information on existing scalable targets. Configure and manage automatic scaling - Define scaling policies to dynamically scale your resources in response to CloudWatch alarms, schedule one-time or recurring scaling actions, and retrieve your recent scaling activity history. Suspend and resume scaling - Temporarily suspend and later resume automatic scaling by calling the RegisterScalableTarget API action for any Application Auto Scaling scalable target. You can suspend and resume (individually or in combination) scale-out activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, scale-in activities that are triggered by a scaling policy, and scheduled scaling. To learn more about Application Auto Scaling, including information about granting IAM users required permissions for Application Auto Scaling actions, see the Application Auto Scaling User Guide.

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Amazon CloudWatch

Amazon CloudWatch monitors your Amazon Web Services (Amazon Web Services) resources and the applications you run on Amazon Web Services in real time. You can use CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, which are the variables you want to measure for your resources and applications. CloudWatch alarms send notifications or automatically change the resources you are monitoring based on rules that you define. For example, you can monitor the CPU usage and disk reads and writes of your Amazon EC2 instances. Then, use this data to determine whether you should launch additional instances to handle increased load. You can also use this data to stop under-used instances to save money. In addition to monitoring the built-in metrics that come with Amazon Web Services, you can monitor your own custom metrics. With CloudWatch, you gain system-wide visibility into resource utilization, application performance, and operational health.

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles

Amazon Connect Customer Profiles Welcome to the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API Reference. This guide provides information about the Amazon Connect Customer Profiles API, including supported operations, data types, parameters, and schemas. Amazon Connect Customer Profiles is a unified customer profile for your contact center that has pre-built connectors powered by AppFlow that make it easy to combine customer information from third party applications, such as Salesforce (CRM), ServiceNow (ITSM), and your enterprise resource planning (ERP), with contact history from your Amazon Connect contact center. If you're new to Amazon Connect , you might find it helpful to also review the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide.

Amazon QuickSight

Amazon QuickSight API Reference Amazon QuickSight is a fully managed, serverless business intelligence service for the Amazon Web Services Cloud that makes it easy to extend data and insights to every user in your organization. This API reference contains documentation for a programming interface that you can use to manage Amazon QuickSight.

AWS Systems Manager Incident Manager

AWS Systems Manager Incident Manager is an incident management console designed to help users mitigate and recover from incidents affecting their AWS-hosted applications. An incident is any unplanned interruption or reduction in quality of services. Incident Manager increases incident resolution by notifying responders of impact, highlighting relevant troubleshooting data, and providing collaboration tools to get services back up and running. To achieve the primary goal of reducing the time-to-resolution of critical incidents, Incident Manager automates response plans and enables responder team escalation.

AWS CodeStar connections

AWS CodeStar Connections This AWS CodeStar Connections API Reference provides descriptions and usage examples of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar Connections API. You can use the connections API to work with connections and installations. Connections are configurations that you use to connect AWS resources to external code repositories. Each connection is a resource that can be given to services such as CodePipeline to connect to a third-party repository such as Bitbucket. For example, you can add the connection in CodePipeline so that it triggers your pipeline when a code change is made to your third-party code repository. Each connection is named and associated with a unique ARN that is used to reference the connection. When you create a connection, the console initiates a third-party connection handshake. Installations are the apps that are used to conduct this handshake. For example, the installation for the Bitbucket provider type is the Bitbucket app. When you create a connection, you can choose an existing installation or create one. When you want to create a connection to an installed provider type such as GitHub Enterprise Server, you create a host for your connections. You can work with connections by calling: CreateConnection, which creates a uniquely named connection that can be referenced by services such as CodePipeline. DeleteConnection, which deletes the specified connection. GetConnection, which returns information about the connection, including the connection status. ListConnections, which lists the connections associated with your account. You can work with hosts by calling: CreateHost, which creates a host that represents the infrastructure where your provider is installed. DeleteHost, which deletes the specified host. GetHost, which returns information about the host, including the setup status. ListHosts, which lists the hosts associated with your account. You can work with tags in AWS CodeStar Connections by calling the following: ListTagsForResource, which gets information about AWS tags for a specified Amazon Resource Name (ARN) in AWS CodeStar Connections. TagResource, which adds or updates tags for a resource in AWS CodeStar Connections. UntagResource, which removes tags for a resource in AWS CodeStar Connections. For information about how to use AWS CodeStar Connections, see the Developer Tools User Guide.

Amazon Lex Runtime Service

Amazon Lex provides both build and runtime endpoints. Each endpoint provides a set of operations (API). Your conversational bot uses the runtime API to understand user utterances (user input text or voice). For example, suppose a user says "I want pizza", your bot sends this input to Amazon Lex using the runtime API. Amazon Lex recognizes that the user request is for the OrderPizza intent (one of the intents defined in the bot). Then Amazon Lex engages in user conversation on behalf of the bot to elicit required information (slot values, such as pizza size and crust type), and then performs fulfillment activity (that you configured when you created the bot). You use the build-time API to create and manage your Amazon Lex bot. For a list of build-time operations, see the build-time API, .

AWS CloudHSM V2

For more information about AWS CloudHSM, see AWS CloudHSM and the AWS CloudHSM User Guide.

AWS Organizations

AWS Organizations is a web service that enables you to consolidate your multiple AWS accounts into an organization and centrally manage your accounts and their resources. This guide provides descriptions of the Organizations operations. For more information about using this service, see the AWS Organizations User Guide. Support and feedback for AWS Organizations We welcome your feedback. Send your comments to [email protected] or post your feedback and questions in the AWS Organizations support forum. For more information about the AWS support forums, see Forums Help. Endpoint to call When using the AWS CLI or the AWS SDK For the current release of Organizations, specify the us-east-1 region for all AWS API and AWS CLI calls made from the commercial AWS Regions outside of China. If calling from one of the AWS Regions in China, then specify cn-northwest-1. You can do this in the AWS CLI by using these parameters and commands: Use the following parameter with each command to specify both the endpoint and its region: --endpoint-url https://organizations.us-east-1.amazonaws.com (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or --endpoint-url https://organizations.cn-northwest-1.amazonaws.com.cn (from AWS Regions in China) Use the default endpoint, but configure your default region with this command: aws configure set default.region us-east-1 (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or aws configure set default.region cn-northwest-1 (from AWS Regions in China) Use the following parameter with each command to specify the endpoint: --region us-east-1 (from commercial AWS Regions outside of China) or --region cn-northwest-1 (from AWS Regions in China) Recording API Requests AWS Organizations supports AWS CloudTrail, a service that records AWS API calls for your AWS account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. By using information collected by AWS CloudTrail, you can determine which requests the Organizations service received, who made the request and when, and so on. For more about AWS Organizations and its support for AWS CloudTrail, see Logging AWS Organizations Events with AWS CloudTrail in the AWS Organizations User Guide. To learn more about AWS CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the AWS CloudTrail User Guide.

AWS Outposts

AWS Outposts is a fully managed service that extends AWS infrastructure, APIs, and tools to customer premises. By providing local access to AWS managed infrastructure, AWS Outposts enables customers to build and run applications on premises using the same programming interfaces as in AWS Regions, while using local compute and storage resources for lower latency and local data processing needs.

AWS Shield

Shield Advanced This is the Shield Advanced API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Shield Advanced API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about WAF and Shield Advanced features and an overview of how to use the WAF and Shield Advanced APIs, see the WAF and Shield Developer Guide.

Amazon ElastiCache

Amazon ElastiCache Amazon ElastiCache is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a distributed cache in the cloud. With ElastiCache, customers get all of the benefits of a high-performance, in-memory cache with less of the administrative burden involved in launching and managing a distributed cache. The service makes setup, scaling, and cluster failure handling much simpler than in a self-managed cache deployment. In addition, through integration with Amazon CloudWatch, customers get enhanced visibility into the key performance statistics associated with their cache and can receive alarms if a part of their cache runs hot.