Mock sample for your project: Amazon EventBridge API

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Amazon EventBridge

amazonaws.com

Version: 2015-10-07


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "Amazon EventBridge API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs: no more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, etc.

Description

Amazon EventBridge helps you to respond to state changes in your Amazon Web Services resources. When your resources change state, they automatically send events to an event stream. You can create rules that match selected events in the stream and route them to targets to take action. You can also use rules to take action on a predetermined schedule. For example, you can configure rules to: Automatically invoke an Lambda function to update DNS entries when an event notifies you that Amazon EC2 instance enters the running state. Direct specific API records from CloudTrail to an Amazon Kinesis data stream for detailed analysis of potential security or availability risks. Periodically invoke a built-in target to create a snapshot of an Amazon EBS volume. For more information about the features of Amazon EventBridge, see the Amazon EventBridge User Guide.

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If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. 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With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

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