Mock sample for your project: Amazon Cognito Identity API

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Amazon Cognito Identity

amazonaws.com

Version: 2014-06-30


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "Amazon Cognito Identity API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

Amazon Cognito Federated Identities Amazon Cognito Federated Identities is a web service that delivers scoped temporary credentials to mobile devices and other untrusted environments. It uniquely identifies a device and supplies the user with a consistent identity over the lifetime of an application. Using Amazon Cognito Federated Identities, you can enable authentication with one or more third-party identity providers (Facebook, Google, or Login with Amazon) or an Amazon Cognito user pool, and you can also choose to support unauthenticated access from your app. Cognito delivers a unique identifier for each user and acts as an OpenID token provider trusted by AWS Security Token Service (STS) to access temporary, limited-privilege AWS credentials. For a description of the authentication flow from the Amazon Cognito Developer Guide see Authentication Flow. For more information see Amazon Cognito Federated Identities.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. If you already have Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP address resources set up for your applications, you can easily add those to a standard accelerator in Global Accelerator. This allows Global Accelerator to use static IP addresses to access the resources. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. Accelerator An accelerator directs traffic to endpoints over the AWS global network to improve the performance of your internet applications. Each accelerator includes one or more listeners. There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. This can be useful, for example, to do performance testing within a Region. Endpoints for custom routing accelerators are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets with one or many EC2 instances.

AmazonMWAA

Amazon Managed Workflows for Apache Airflow This section contains the Amazon Managed Workflows for Apache Airflow (MWAA) API reference documentation. For more information, see What Is Amazon MWAA?.

AWS Single Sign-On Admin

Amazon Web Services Single Sign On (SSO) is a cloud SSO service that makes it easy to centrally manage SSO access to multiple Amazon Web Services accounts and business applications. This guide provides information on SSO operations which could be used for access management of Amazon Web Services accounts. For information about Amazon Web Services SSO features, see the Amazon Web Services Single Sign-On User Guide. Many operations in the SSO APIs rely on identifiers for users and groups, known as principals. For more information about how to work with principals and principal IDs in Amazon Web Services SSO, see the Amazon Web Services SSO Identity Store API Reference.

AWS Marketplace Catalog Service

Catalog API actions allow you to manage your entities through list, describe, and update capabilities. An entity can be a product or an offer on AWS Marketplace. You can automate your entity update process by integrating the AWS Marketplace Catalog API with your AWS Marketplace product build or deployment pipelines. You can also create your own applications on top of the Catalog API to manage your products on AWS Marketplace.

AWS MediaTailor

Use the AWS Elemental MediaTailor SDKs and CLI to configure scalable ad insertion and linear channels. With MediaTailor, you can assemble existing content into a linear stream and serve targeted ads to viewers while maintaining broadcast quality in over-the-top (OTT) video applications. For information about using the service, including detailed information about the settings covered in this guide, see the AWS Elemental MediaTailor User Guide. Through the SDKs and the CLI you manage AWS Elemental MediaTailor configurations and channels the same as you do through the console. For example, you specify ad insertion behavior and mapping information for the origin server and the ad decision server (ADS).

Amazon Kinesis Video Streams Archived Media

AWS Network Firewall

This is the API Reference for AWS Network Firewall. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Network Firewall API actions, data types, and errors. The REST API requires you to handle connection details, such as calculating signatures, handling request retries, and error handling. For general information about using the AWS REST APIs, see AWS APIs. To access Network Firewall using the REST API endpoint: https://network-firewall..amazonaws.com Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that's tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. For descriptions of Network Firewall features, including and step-by-step instructions on how to use them through the Network Firewall console, see the Network Firewall Developer Guide. Network Firewall is a stateful, managed, network firewall and intrusion detection and prevention service for Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC). With Network Firewall, you can filter traffic at the perimeter of your VPC. This includes filtering traffic going to and coming from an internet gateway, NAT gateway, or over VPN or AWS Direct Connect. Network Firewall uses rules that are compatible with Suricata, a free, open source intrusion detection system (IDS) engine. For information about Suricata, see the Suricata website. You can use Network Firewall to monitor and protect your VPC traffic in a number of ways. The following are just a few examples: Allow domains or IP addresses for known AWS service endpoints, such as Amazon S3, and block all other forms of traffic. Use custom lists of known bad domains to limit the types of domain names that your applications can access. Perform deep packet inspection on traffic entering or leaving your VPC. Use stateful protocol detection to filter protocols like HTTPS, regardless of the port used. To enable Network Firewall for your VPCs, you perform steps in both Amazon VPC and in Network Firewall. For information about using Amazon VPC, see Amazon VPC User Guide. To start using Network Firewall, do the following: (Optional) If you don't already have a VPC that you want to protect, create it in Amazon VPC. In Amazon VPC, in each Availability Zone where you want to have a firewall endpoint, create a subnet for the sole use of Network Firewall. In Network Firewall, create stateless and stateful rule groups, to define the components of the network traffic filtering behavior that you want your firewall to have. In Network Firewall, create a firewall policy that uses your rule groups and specifies additional default traffic filtering behavior. In Network Firewall, create a firewall and specify your new firewall policy and VPC subnets. Network Firewall creates a firewall endpoint in each subnet that you specify, with the behavior that's defined in the firewall policy. In Amazon VPC, use ingress routing enhancements to route traffic through the new firewall endpoints.

AWS Systems Manager Incident Manager Contacts

Systems Manager Incident Manager is an incident management console designed to help users mitigate and recover from incidents affecting their Amazon Web Services-hosted applications. An incident is any unplanned interruption or reduction in quality of services. Incident Manager increases incident resolution by notifying responders of impact, highlighting relevant troubleshooting data, and providing collaboration tools to get services back up and running. To achieve the primary goal of reducing the time-to-resolution of critical incidents, Incident Manager automates response plans and enables responder team escalation.

Amazon Sagemaker Edge Manager

SageMaker Edge Manager dataplane service for communicating with active agents.

Amazon QLDB

The control plane for Amazon QLDB

Amazon CloudWatch

Amazon CloudWatch monitors your Amazon Web Services (Amazon Web Services) resources and the applications you run on Amazon Web Services in real time. You can use CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, which are the variables you want to measure for your resources and applications. CloudWatch alarms send notifications or automatically change the resources you are monitoring based on rules that you define. For example, you can monitor the CPU usage and disk reads and writes of your Amazon EC2 instances. Then, use this data to determine whether you should launch additional instances to handle increased load. You can also use this data to stop under-used instances to save money. In addition to monitoring the built-in metrics that come with Amazon Web Services, you can monitor your own custom metrics. With CloudWatch, you gain system-wide visibility into resource utilization, application performance, and operational health.

Amazon Lex Runtime V2

Other APIs in the same category

AWS Config

Config Config provides a way to keep track of the configurations of all the Amazon Web Services resources associated with your Amazon Web Services account. You can use Config to get the current and historical configurations of each Amazon Web Services resource and also to get information about the relationship between the resources. An Amazon Web Services resource can be an Amazon Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance, an Elastic Block Store (EBS) volume, an elastic network Interface (ENI), or a security group. For a complete list of resources currently supported by Config, see Supported Amazon Web Services resources. You can access and manage Config through the Amazon Web Services Management Console, the Amazon Web Services Command Line Interface (Amazon Web Services CLI), the Config API, or the Amazon Web Services SDKs for Config. This reference guide contains documentation for the Config API and the Amazon Web Services CLI commands that you can use to manage Config. The Config API uses the Signature Version 4 protocol for signing requests. For more information about how to sign a request with this protocol, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process. For detailed information about Config features and their associated actions or commands, as well as how to work with Amazon Web Services Management Console, see What Is Config in the Config Developer Guide.

Azure Maps Resource Provider

azure.com
Resource Provider

Azure Addons Resource Provider

azure.com
The service for managing third party addons.

FabricAdminClient

azure.com
Storage subsystem operation endpoints and objects.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on NamedValue entity associated with your Azure API Management deployment. API Management policies are a powerful capability of the system that allow the publisher to change the behavior of the API through configuration. Policies are a collection of statements that are executed sequentially on the request or response of an API. Policy statements can be constructed using literal text values, policy expressions, and NamedValues. Each API Management service instance has a NamedValues collection of key/value pairs that are global to the service instance. These NamedValues can be used to manage constant string values across all API configuration and policies.

Amazon EC2 Container Registry

Amazon Elastic Container Registry Amazon Elastic Container Registry (Amazon ECR) is a managed container image registry service. Customers can use the familiar Docker CLI, or their preferred client, to push, pull, and manage images. Amazon ECR provides a secure, scalable, and reliable registry for your Docker or Open Container Initiative (OCI) images. Amazon ECR supports private repositories with resource-based permissions using IAM so that specific users or Amazon EC2 instances can access repositories and images. Amazon ECR has service endpoints in each supported Region. For more information, see Amazon ECR endpoints in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

AWS DataSync

DataSync DataSync is a managed data transfer service that makes it simpler for you to automate moving data between on-premises storage and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) or Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS). This API interface reference for DataSync contains documentation for a programming interface that you can use to manage DataSync.

Amazon Transcribe Service

Operations and objects for transcribing speech to text.

AWS OpsWorks

AWS OpsWorks Welcome to the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API Reference. This guide provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for AWS OpsWorks Stacks actions and data types, including common parameters and error codes. AWS OpsWorks Stacks is an application management service that provides an integrated experience for overseeing the complete application lifecycle. For information about this product, go to the AWS OpsWorks details page. SDKs and CLI The most common way to use the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API is by using the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) or by using one of the AWS SDKs to implement applications in your preferred language. For more information, see: AWS CLI AWS SDK for Java AWS SDK for .NET AWS SDK for PHP 2 AWS SDK for Ruby AWS SDK for Node.js AWS SDK for Python(Boto) Endpoints AWS OpsWorks Stacks supports the following endpoints, all HTTPS. You must connect to one of the following endpoints. Stacks can only be accessed or managed within the endpoint in which they are created. opsworks.us-east-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-east-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.ca-central-1.amazonaws.com (API only; not available in the AWS console) opsworks.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-west-3.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-northeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-northeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.sa-east-1.amazonaws.com Chef Versions When you call CreateStack, CloneStack, or UpdateStack we recommend you use the ConfigurationManager parameter to specify the Chef version. The recommended and default value for Linux stacks is currently 12. Windows stacks use Chef 12.2. For more information, see Chef Versions. You can specify Chef 12, 11.10, or 11.4 for your Linux stack. We recommend migrating your existing Linux stacks to Chef 12 as soon as possible.

Managed Streaming for Kafka Connect

Amazon CloudWatch Logs

You can use Amazon CloudWatch Logs to monitor, store, and access your log files from EC2 instances, CloudTrail, and other sources. You can then retrieve the associated log data from CloudWatch Logs using the CloudWatch console, CloudWatch Logs commands in the Amazon Web Services CLI, CloudWatch Logs API, or CloudWatch Logs SDK. You can use CloudWatch Logs to: Monitor logs from EC2 instances in real-time : You can use CloudWatch Logs to monitor applications and systems using log data. For example, CloudWatch Logs can track the number of errors that occur in your application logs and send you a notification whenever the rate of errors exceeds a threshold that you specify. CloudWatch Logs uses your log data for monitoring so no code changes are required. For example, you can monitor application logs for specific literal terms (such as "NullReferenceException") or count the number of occurrences of a literal term at a particular position in log data (such as "404" status codes in an Apache access log). When the term you are searching for is found, CloudWatch Logs reports the data to a CloudWatch metric that you specify. Monitor CloudTrail logged events : You can create alarms in CloudWatch and receive notifications of particular API activity as captured by CloudTrail. You can use the notification to perform troubleshooting. Archive log data : You can use CloudWatch Logs to store your log data in highly durable storage. You can change the log retention setting so that any log events older than this setting are automatically deleted. The CloudWatch Logs agent makes it easy to quickly send both rotated and non-rotated log data off of a host and into the log service. You can then access the raw log data when you need it.

AdvisorManagementClient

azure.com
REST APIs for Azure Advisor