Mock sample for your project: SqlManagementClient API

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SqlManagementClient

azure.com

Version: 2018-06-01-preview


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Speed up your application development by using "SqlManagementClient API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

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AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

AWS Proton

This is the AWS Proton Service API Reference. It provides descriptions, syntax and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for the AWS Proton service. The documentation for each action shows the Query API request parameters and the XML response. Alternatively, you can use the AWS CLI to access an API. For more information, see the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide. The AWS Proton service is a two-pronged automation framework. Administrators create service templates to provide standardized infrastructure and deployment tooling for serverless and container based applications. Developers, in turn, select from the available service templates to automate their application or service deployments. Because administrators define the infrastructure and tooling that AWS Proton deploys and manages, they need permissions to use all of the listed API operations. When developers select a specific infrastructure and tooling set, AWS Proton deploys their applications. To monitor their applications that are running on AWS Proton, developers need permissions to the service create, list, update and delete API operations and the service instance list and update API operations. To learn more about AWS Proton administration, see the AWS Proton Administrator Guide. To learn more about deploying serverless and containerized applications on AWS Proton, see the AWS Proton User Guide. Ensuring Idempotency When you make a mutating API request, the request typically returns a result before the asynchronous workflows of the operation are complete. Operations might also time out or encounter other server issues before they're complete, even if the request already returned a result. This might make it difficult to determine whether the request succeeded. Moreover, you might need to retry the request multiple times to ensure that the operation completes successfully. However, if the original request and the subsequent retries are successful, the operation occurs multiple times. This means that you might create more resources than you intended. Idempotency ensures that an API request action completes no more than one time. With an idempotent request, if the original request action completes successfully, any subsequent retries complete successfully without performing any further actions. However, the result might contain updated information, such as the current creation status. The following lists of APIs are grouped according to methods that ensure idempotency. Idempotent create APIs with a client token The API actions in this list support idempotency with the use of a client token. The corresponding AWS CLI commands also support idempotency using a client token. A client token is a unique, case-sensitive string of up to 64 ASCII characters. To make an idempotent API request using one of these actions, specify a client token in the request. We recommend that you don't reuse the same client token for other API requests. If you don’t provide a client token for these APIs, a default client token is automatically provided by SDKs. Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request using the same client token and the same parameters, the retry succeeds without performing any further actions other than returning the original resource detail data in the response. If you retry the request using the same client token, but one or more of the parameters are different, the retry throws a ValidationException with an IdempotentParameterMismatch error. Client tokens expire eight hours after a request is made. If you retry the request with the expired token, a new resource is created. If the original resource is deleted and you retry the request, a new resource is created. Idempotent create APIs with a client token: CreateEnvironmentTemplateVersion CreateServiceTemplateVersion CreateEnvironmentAccountConnection Idempotent create APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request with an API from this group, and the original resource hasn't been modified, the retry succeeds without performing any further actions other than returning the original resource detail data in the response. If the original resource has been modified, the retry throws a ConflictException. If you retry with different input parameters, the retry throws a ValidationException with an IdempotentParameterMismatch error. Idempotent create APIs: CreateEnvironmentTemplate CreateServiceTemplate CreateEnvironment CreateService Idempotent delete APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: When you retry the request with an API from this group and the resource was deleted, its metadata is returned in the response. If you retry and the resource doesn't exist, the response is empty. In both cases, the retry succeeds. Idempotent delete APIs: DeleteEnvironmentTemplate DeleteEnvironmentTemplateVersion DeleteServiceTemplate DeleteServiceTemplateVersion DeleteEnvironmentAccountConnection Asynchronous idempotent delete APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request with an API from this group, if the original request delete operation status is DELETEINPROGRESS, the retry returns the resource detail data in the response without performing any further actions. If the original request delete operation is complete, a retry returns an empty response. Asynchronous idempotent delete APIs: DeleteEnvironment DeleteService

AWS Data Pipeline

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Amazon Interactive Video Service

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations on NamedValue entity associated with your Azure API Management deployment. API Management policies are a powerful capability of the system that allow the publisher to change the behavior of the API through configuration. Policies are a collection of statements that are executed sequentially on the request or response of an API. Policy statements can be constructed using literal text values, policy expressions, and NamedValues. Each API Management service instance has a NamedValues collection of key/value pairs that are global to the service instance. These NamedValues can be used to manage constant string values across all API configuration and policies.

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