Mock sample for your project: Azure SQL Database disaster recovery configurations API

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Azure SQL Database disaster recovery configurations

azure.com

Version: 2014-04-01


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "Azure SQL Database disaster recovery configurations API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

Provides create, read, update, delete, and failover functionality for Azure SQL Database disaster recovery configurations.

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Elastic Load Balancing

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AWS Application Discovery Service

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