Mock sample for your project: Amazon Chime SDK Messaging API

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Amazon Chime SDK Messaging

amazonaws.com

Version: 2021-05-15


Use this API in your project

Speed up your application development by using "Amazon Chime SDK Messaging API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
It also improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

The Amazon Chime SDK Messaging APIs in this section allow software developers to send and receive messages in custom messaging applications. These APIs depend on the frameworks provided by the Amazon Chime SDK Identity APIs. For more information about the messaging APIs, see Amazon Chime SDK messaging

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

AWS Amplify

Amplify enables developers to develop and deploy cloud-powered mobile and web apps. The Amplify Console provides a continuous delivery and hosting service for web applications. For more information, see the Amplify Console User Guide. The Amplify Framework is a comprehensive set of SDKs, libraries, tools, and documentation for client app development. For more information, see the Amplify Framework.

AWS Direct Connect

Direct Connect links your internal network to an Direct Connect location over a standard Ethernet fiber-optic cable. One end of the cable is connected to your router, the other to an Direct Connect router. With this connection in place, you can create virtual interfaces directly to the Cloud (for example, to Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3) and to Amazon VPC, bypassing Internet service providers in your network path. A connection provides access to all Regions except the China (Beijing) and (China) Ningxia Regions. Amazon Web Services resources in the China Regions can only be accessed through locations associated with those Regions.

AWS CodeStar

AWS CodeStar This is the API reference for AWS CodeStar. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar API along with usage examples. You can use the AWS CodeStar API to work with: Projects and their resources, by calling the following: DeleteProject, which deletes a project. DescribeProject, which lists the attributes of a project. ListProjects, which lists all projects associated with your AWS account. ListResources, which lists the resources associated with a project. ListTagsForProject, which lists the tags associated with a project. TagProject, which adds tags to a project. UntagProject, which removes tags from a project. UpdateProject, which updates the attributes of a project. Teams and team members, by calling the following: AssociateTeamMember, which adds an IAM user to the team for a project. DisassociateTeamMember, which removes an IAM user from the team for a project. ListTeamMembers, which lists all the IAM users in the team for a project, including their roles and attributes. UpdateTeamMember, which updates a team member's attributes in a project. Users, by calling the following: CreateUserProfile, which creates a user profile that contains data associated with the user across all projects. DeleteUserProfile, which deletes all user profile information across all projects. DescribeUserProfile, which describes the profile of a user. ListUserProfiles, which lists all user profiles. UpdateUserProfile, which updates the profile for a user.

Amazon Relational Database Service

Amazon Relational Database Service Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud. It provides cost-efficient, resizeable capacity for an industry-standard relational database and manages common database administration tasks, freeing up developers to focus on what makes their applications and businesses unique. Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, or Amazon Aurora database server. These capabilities mean that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases work with Amazon RDS without modification. Amazon RDS automatically backs up your database and maintains the database software that powers your DB instance. Amazon RDS is flexible: you can scale your DB instance's compute resources and storage capacity to meet your application's demand. As with all Amazon Web Services, there are no up-front investments, and you pay only for the resources you use. This interface reference for Amazon RDS contains documentation for a programming or command line interface you can use to manage Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS is asynchronous, which means that some interfaces might require techniques such as polling or callback functions to determine when a command has been applied. In this reference, the parameter descriptions indicate whether a command is applied immediately, on the next instance reboot, or during the maintenance window. The reference structure is as follows, and we list following some related topics from the user guide. Amazon RDS API Reference For the alphabetical list of API actions, see API Actions. For the alphabetical list of data types, see Data Types. For a list of common query parameters, see Common Parameters. For descriptions of the error codes, see Common Errors. Amazon RDS User Guide For a summary of the Amazon RDS interfaces, see Available RDS Interfaces. For more information about how to use the Query API, see Using the Query API.

AWS Key Management Service

Key Management Service Key Management Service (KMS) is an encryption and key management web service. This guide describes the KMS operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about KMS, see the Key Management Service Developer Guide . KMS is replacing the term customer master key (CMK) with KMS key and KMS key. The concept has not changed. To prevent breaking changes, KMS is keeping some variations of this term. Amazon Web Services provides SDKs that consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .Net, macOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to KMS and other Amazon Web Services services. For example, the SDKs take care of tasks such as signing requests (see below), managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services. We recommend that you use the Amazon Web Services SDKs to make programmatic API calls to KMS. Clients must support TLS (Transport Layer Security) 1.0. We recommend TLS 1.2. Clients must also support cipher suites with Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) such as Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (DHE) or Elliptic Curve Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (ECDHE). Most modern systems such as Java 7 and later support these modes. Signing Requests Requests must be signed by using an access key ID and a secret access key. We strongly recommend that you do not use your Amazon Web Services account (root) access key ID and secret key for everyday work with KMS. Instead, use the access key ID and secret access key for an IAM user. You can also use the Amazon Web Services Security Token Service to generate temporary security credentials that you can use to sign requests. All KMS operations require Signature Version 4. Logging API Requests KMS supports CloudTrail, a service that logs Amazon Web Services API calls and related events for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers them to an Amazon S3 bucket that you specify. By using the information collected by CloudTrail, you can determine what requests were made to KMS, who made the request, when it was made, and so on. To learn more about CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the CloudTrail User Guide. Additional Resources For more information about credentials and request signing, see the following: Amazon Web Services Security Credentials - This topic provides general information about the types of credentials used to access Amazon Web Services. Temporary Security Credentials - This section of the IAM User Guide describes how to create and use temporary security credentials. Signature Version 4 Signing Process - This set of topics walks you through the process of signing a request using an access key ID and a secret access key. Commonly Used API Operations Of the API operations discussed in this guide, the following will prove the most useful for most applications. You will likely perform operations other than these, such as creating keys and assigning policies, by using the console. Encrypt Decrypt GenerateDataKey GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

Amazon Machine Learning

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Amazon ElastiCache

Amazon ElastiCache Amazon ElastiCache is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a distributed cache in the cloud. With ElastiCache, customers get all of the benefits of a high-performance, in-memory cache with less of the administrative burden involved in launching and managing a distributed cache. The service makes setup, scaling, and cluster failure handling much simpler than in a self-managed cache deployment. In addition, through integration with Amazon CloudWatch, customers get enhanced visibility into the key performance statistics associated with their cache and can receive alarms if a part of their cache runs hot.

AWS License Manager

AWS License Manager AWS License Manager makes it easier to manage licenses from software vendors across multiple AWS accounts and on-premises servers.

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights is a service that helps you detect common problems with your applications. It enables you to pinpoint the source of issues in your applications (built with technologies such as Microsoft IIS, .NET, and Microsoft SQL Server), by providing key insights into detected problems. After you onboard your application, CloudWatch Application Insights identifies, recommends, and sets up metrics and logs. It continuously analyzes and correlates your metrics and logs for unusual behavior to surface actionable problems with your application. For example, if your application is slow and unresponsive and leading to HTTP 500 errors in your Application Load Balancer (ALB), Application Insights informs you that a memory pressure problem with your SQL Server database is occurring. It bases this analysis on impactful metrics and log errors.

AWS Lambda

Lambda Overview This is the Lambda API Reference. The Lambda Developer Guide provides additional information. For the service overview, see What is Lambda, and for information about how the service works, see Lambda: How it Works in the Lambda Developer Guide.

Elastic Load Balancing

Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer can distribute incoming traffic across your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered instances and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy instances. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer and a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the instances. Elastic Load Balancing supports three types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. You can select a load balancer based on your application needs. For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. This reference covers the 2012-06-01 API, which supports Classic Load Balancers. The 2015-12-01 API supports Application Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers. To get started, create a load balancer with one or more listeners using CreateLoadBalancer. Register your instances with the load balancer using RegisterInstancesWithLoadBalancer. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds with a 200 OK response code.

Amazon Simple Workflow Service

Amazon Simple Workflow Service The Amazon Simple Workflow Service (Amazon SWF) makes it easy to build applications that use Amazon's cloud to coordinate work across distributed components. In Amazon SWF, a task represents a logical unit of work that is performed by a component of your workflow. Coordinating tasks in a workflow involves managing intertask dependencies, scheduling, and concurrency in accordance with the logical flow of the application. Amazon SWF gives you full control over implementing tasks and coordinating them without worrying about underlying complexities such as tracking their progress and maintaining their state. This documentation serves as reference only. For a broader overview of the Amazon SWF programming model, see the Amazon SWF Developer Guide .

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Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer can distribute incoming traffic across your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered instances and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy instances. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer and a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the instances. Elastic Load Balancing supports three types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. You can select a load balancer based on your application needs. For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. This reference covers the 2012-06-01 API, which supports Classic Load Balancers. The 2015-12-01 API supports Application Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers. To get started, create a load balancer with one or more listeners using CreateLoadBalancer. Register your instances with the load balancer using RegisterInstancesWithLoadBalancer. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds with a 200 OK response code.

AWS CodePipeline

AWS CodePipeline Overview This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline can only be configured through the API. For more information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide. You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, and transitions. Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of stages, actions, and transitions. You can work with pipelines by calling: CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely named pipeline. DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline. GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN). GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline. GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline. ListActionExecutions, which returns action-level details for past executions. The details include full stage and action-level details, including individual action duration, status, any errors that occurred during the execution, and input and output artifact location details. ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account. ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline. StartPipelineExecution, which runs the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline. StopPipelineExecution, which stops the specified pipeline execution from continuing through the pipeline. UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline. Pipelines include stages. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage results in success or failure. If a stage fails, the pipeline stops at that stage and remains stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to rerun the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, see AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference. Pipeline stages include actions that are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed in a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState. Valid action categories are: Source Build Test Deploy Approval Invoke Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete. You can work with transitions by calling: DisableStageTransition, which prevents artifacts from transitioning to the next stage in a pipeline. EnableStageTransition, which enables transition of artifacts between stages in a pipeline. Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. To integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers need to work with the following items: Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source. You can work with jobs by calling: AcknowledgeJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetJobDetails, which returns the details of a job. PollForJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success. Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network. You can work with third party jobs by calling: AcknowledgeThirdPartyJob, which confirms whether a job worker has received the specified job. GetThirdPartyJobDetails, which requests the details of a job for a partner action. PollForThirdPartyJobs, which determines whether there are any jobs to act on. PutThirdPartyJobFailureResult, which provides details of a job failure. PutThirdPartyJobSuccessResult, which provides details of a job success.

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