Mock sample for your project: Azure SQL Database Datamasking Policies and Rules API

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Azure SQL Database Datamasking Policies and Rules

azure.com

Version: 2014-04-01


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "Azure SQL Database Datamasking Policies and Rules API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs: no more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, etc.

Description

Provides create, read, update and delete functionality for Azure SQL Database datamasking policies and rules.

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CreateApprovalRuleTemplate, which creates a template for approval rules that can then be associated with one or more repositories in your AWS account. DeleteApprovalRuleTemplate, which deletes the specified template. It does not remove approval rules on pull requests already created with the template. DisassociateApprovalRuleTemplateFromRepository, which removes the association between a template and a repository so that approval rules based on the template are not automatically created when pull requests are created in the specified repository. GetApprovalRuleTemplate, which returns information about an approval rule template. ListApprovalRuleTemplates, which lists all approval rule templates in the AWS Region in your AWS account. ListAssociatedApprovalRuleTemplatesForRepository, which lists all approval rule templates that are associated with a specified repository. 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