Mock sample for your project: AWS Cloud Map API

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AWS Cloud Map

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-03-14


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Description

Cloud Map With Cloud Map, you can configure public DNS, private DNS, or HTTP namespaces that your microservice applications run in. When an instance becomes available, you can call the Cloud Map API to register the instance with Cloud Map. For public or private DNS namespaces, Cloud Map automatically creates DNS records and an optional health check. Clients that submit public or private DNS queries, or HTTP requests, for the service receive an answer that contains up to eight healthy records.

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AWSServerlessApplicationRepository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository makes it easy for developers and enterprises to quickly find
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all levels can get started with serverless computing without needing to learn anything new. You can use category
keywords to browse for applications such as web and mobile backends, data processing applications, or chatbots.
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Amazon Simple Email Service

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Amazon Route 53

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AWS S3 Control

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Amazon Relational Database Service

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AWS Proton

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However, if the original request and the subsequent retries are successful, the operation occurs multiple times. This means that you might create more resources than you intended. Idempotency ensures that an API request action completes no more than one time. With an idempotent request, if the original request action completes successfully, any subsequent retries complete successfully without performing any further actions. However, the result might contain updated information, such as the current creation status. The following lists of APIs are grouped according to methods that ensure idempotency. Idempotent create APIs with a client token The API actions in this list support idempotency with the use of a client token. The corresponding AWS CLI commands also support idempotency using a client token. A client token is a unique, case-sensitive string of up to 64 ASCII characters. To make an idempotent API request using one of these actions, specify a client token in the request. We recommend that you don't reuse the same client token for other API requests. If you don’t provide a client token for these APIs, a default client token is automatically provided by SDKs. Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request using the same client token and the same parameters, the retry succeeds without performing any further actions other than returning the original resource detail data in the response. If you retry the request using the same client token, but one or more of the parameters are different, the retry throws a ValidationException with an IdempotentParameterMismatch error. Client tokens expire eight hours after a request is made. If you retry the request with the expired token, a new resource is created. If the original resource is deleted and you retry the request, a new resource is created. Idempotent create APIs with a client token: CreateEnvironmentTemplateVersion CreateServiceTemplateVersion CreateEnvironmentAccountConnection Idempotent create APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request with an API from this group, and the original resource hasn't been modified, the retry succeeds without performing any further actions other than returning the original resource detail data in the response. If the original resource has been modified, the retry throws a ConflictException. If you retry with different input parameters, the retry throws a ValidationException with an IdempotentParameterMismatch error. Idempotent create APIs: CreateEnvironmentTemplate CreateServiceTemplate CreateEnvironment CreateService Idempotent delete APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: When you retry the request with an API from this group and the resource was deleted, its metadata is returned in the response. If you retry and the resource doesn't exist, the response is empty. In both cases, the retry succeeds. Idempotent delete APIs: DeleteEnvironmentTemplate DeleteEnvironmentTemplateVersion DeleteServiceTemplate DeleteServiceTemplateVersion DeleteEnvironmentAccountConnection Asynchronous idempotent delete APIs Given a request action that has succeeded: If you retry the request with an API from this group, if the original request delete operation status is DELETEINPROGRESS, the retry returns the resource detail data in the response without performing any further actions. If the original request delete operation is complete, a retry returns an empty response. Asynchronous idempotent delete APIs: DeleteEnvironment DeleteService

AWS Systems Manager Incident Manager Contacts

Systems Manager Incident Manager is an incident management console designed to help users mitigate and recover from incidents affecting their Amazon Web Services-hosted applications. An incident is any unplanned interruption or reduction in quality of services. Incident Manager increases incident resolution by notifying responders of impact, highlighting relevant troubleshooting data, and providing collaboration tools to get services back up and running. To achieve the primary goal of reducing the time-to-resolution of critical incidents, Incident Manager automates response plans and enables responder team escalation.

Amazon Lightsail

Amazon Lightsail is the easiest way to get started with Amazon Web Services (AWS) for developers who need to build websites or web applications. It includes everything you need to launch your project quickly - instances (virtual private servers), container services, storage buckets, managed databases, SSD-based block storage, static IP addresses, load balancers, content delivery network (CDN) distributions, DNS management of registered domains, and resource snapshots (backups) - for a low, predictable monthly price. You can manage your Lightsail resources using the Lightsail console, Lightsail API, AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or SDKs. For more information about Lightsail concepts and tasks, see the Amazon Lightsail Developer Guide. This API Reference provides detailed information about the actions, data types, parameters, and errors of the Lightsail service. For more information about the supported AWS Regions, endpoints, and service quotas of the Lightsail service, see Amazon Lightsail Endpoints and Quotas in the AWS General Reference.

AWS Price List Service

Amazon Web Services Price List Service API (Amazon Web Services Price List Service) is a centralized and convenient way to programmatically query Amazon Web Services for services, products, and pricing information. The Amazon Web Services Price List Service uses standardized product attributes such as Location, Storage Class, and Operating System, and provides prices at the SKU level. You can use the Amazon Web Services Price List Service to build cost control and scenario planning tools, reconcile billing data, forecast future spend for budgeting purposes, and provide cost benefit analysis that compare your internal workloads with Amazon Web Services. Use GetServices without a service code to retrieve the service codes for all AWS services, then GetServices with a service code to retreive the attribute names for that service. After you have the service code and attribute names, you can use GetAttributeValues to see what values are available for an attribute. With the service code and an attribute name and value, you can use GetProducts to find specific products that you're interested in, such as an AmazonEC2 instance, with a Provisioned IOPS volumeType. Service Endpoint Amazon Web Services Price List Service API provides the following two endpoints: https://api.pricing.us-east-1.amazonaws.com https://api.pricing.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com

Other APIs in the same category

Amazon Glacier

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Entity Search Client

microsoft.com
The Entity Search API lets you send a search query to Bing and get back search results that include entities and places. Place results include restaurants, hotel, or other local businesses. For places, the query can specify the name of the local business or it can ask for a list (for example, restaurants near me). Entity results include persons, places, or things. Place in this context is tourist attractions, states, countries, etc.

Elastic Load Balancing

Elastic Load Balancing A load balancer distributes incoming traffic across targets, such as your EC2 instances. This enables you to increase the availability of your application. The load balancer also monitors the health of its registered targets and ensures that it routes traffic only to healthy targets. You configure your load balancer to accept incoming traffic by specifying one or more listeners, which are configured with a protocol and port number for connections from clients to the load balancer. You configure a target group with a protocol and port number for connections from the load balancer to the targets, and with health check settings to be used when checking the health status of the targets. Elastic Load Balancing supports the following types of load balancers: Application Load Balancers, Network Load Balancers, Gateway Load Balancers, and Classic Load Balancers. This reference covers the following load balancer types: Application Load Balancer - Operates at the application layer (layer 7) and supports HTTP and HTTPS. Network Load Balancer - Operates at the transport layer (layer 4) and supports TCP, TLS, and UDP. Gateway Load Balancer - Operates at the network layer (layer 3). For more information, see the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide. All Elastic Load Balancing operations are idempotent, which means that they complete at most one time. If you repeat an operation, it succeeds.

AWS Elemental MediaStore

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ApiManagementClient

azure.com
Use these REST APIs for performing operations in Azure API Management deployment.

Elastic Load Balancing

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AWS RDS DataService

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AWS OpsWorks

AWS OpsWorks Welcome to the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API Reference. This guide provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for AWS OpsWorks Stacks actions and data types, including common parameters and error codes. AWS OpsWorks Stacks is an application management service that provides an integrated experience for overseeing the complete application lifecycle. For information about this product, go to the AWS OpsWorks details page. SDKs and CLI The most common way to use the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API is by using the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) or by using one of the AWS SDKs to implement applications in your preferred language. For more information, see: AWS CLI AWS SDK for Java AWS SDK for .NET AWS SDK for PHP 2 AWS SDK for Ruby AWS SDK for Node.js AWS SDK for Python(Boto) Endpoints AWS OpsWorks Stacks supports the following endpoints, all HTTPS. You must connect to one of the following endpoints. Stacks can only be accessed or managed within the endpoint in which they are created. opsworks.us-east-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-east-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.ca-central-1.amazonaws.com (API only; not available in the AWS console) opsworks.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-west-3.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-northeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-northeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.sa-east-1.amazonaws.com Chef Versions When you call CreateStack, CloneStack, or UpdateStack we recommend you use the ConfigurationManager parameter to specify the Chef version. The recommended and default value for Linux stacks is currently 12. Windows stacks use Chef 12.2. For more information, see Chef Versions. You can specify Chef 12, 11.10, or 11.4 for your Linux stack. We recommend migrating your existing Linux stacks to Chef 12 as soon as possible.

Amazon Pinpoint SMS and Voice Service

Pinpoint SMS and Voice Messaging public facing APIs

SubscriptionsManagementClient

azure.com
The Admin Subscriptions Management Client.

AWS Migration Hub Config

The AWS Migration Hub home region APIs are available specifically for working with your Migration Hub home region. You can use these APIs to determine a home region, as well as to create and work with controls that describe the home region. You must make API calls for write actions (create, notify, associate, disassociate, import, or put) while in your home region, or a HomeRegionNotSetException error is returned. API calls for read actions (list, describe, stop, and delete) are permitted outside of your home region. If you call a write API outside the home region, an InvalidInputException is returned. You can call GetHomeRegion action to obtain the account's Migration Hub home region. For specific API usage, see the sections that follow in this AWS Migration Hub Home Region API reference.

AutomationManagement

azure.com