Mock sample for your project: AWS Cloud Map API

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AWS Cloud Map

amazonaws.com

Version: 2017-03-14


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Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "AWS Cloud Map API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will allow you to start working in no time. No more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

Cloud Map With Cloud Map, you can configure public DNS, private DNS, or HTTP namespaces that your microservice applications run in. When an instance becomes available, you can call the Cloud Map API to register the instance with Cloud Map. For public or private DNS namespaces, Cloud Map automatically creates DNS records and an optional health check. Clients that submit public or private DNS queries, or HTTP requests, for the service receive an answer that contains up to eight healthy records.

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AWS OpsWorks

AWS OpsWorks Welcome to the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API Reference. This guide provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for AWS OpsWorks Stacks actions and data types, including common parameters and error codes. AWS OpsWorks Stacks is an application management service that provides an integrated experience for overseeing the complete application lifecycle. For information about this product, go to the AWS OpsWorks details page. SDKs and CLI The most common way to use the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API is by using the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) or by using one of the AWS SDKs to implement applications in your preferred language. For more information, see: AWS CLI AWS SDK for Java AWS SDK for .NET AWS SDK for PHP 2 AWS SDK for Ruby AWS SDK for Node.js AWS SDK for Python(Boto) Endpoints AWS OpsWorks Stacks supports the following endpoints, all HTTPS. You must connect to one of the following endpoints. Stacks can only be accessed or managed within the endpoint in which they are created. opsworks.us-east-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-east-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.us-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.ca-central-1.amazonaws.com (API only; not available in the AWS console) opsworks.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-west-3.amazonaws.com opsworks.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-northeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-northeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com opsworks.ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com opsworks.sa-east-1.amazonaws.com Chef Versions When you call CreateStack, CloneStack, or UpdateStack we recommend you use the ConfigurationManager parameter to specify the Chef version. The recommended and default value for Linux stacks is currently 12. Windows stacks use Chef 12.2. For more information, see Chef Versions. You can specify Chef 12, 11.10, or 11.4 for your Linux stack. We recommend migrating your existing Linux stacks to Chef 12 as soon as possible.

Managed Streaming for Kafka Connect

Amazon Route 53

Amazon Route 53 is a highly available and scalable Domain Name System (DNS) web service.

Amazon SageMaker Service

Provides APIs for creating and managing Amazon SageMaker resources. Other Resources: Amazon SageMaker Developer Guide Amazon Augmented AI Runtime API Reference

Service Quotas

With Service Quotas, you can view and manage your quotas easily as your AWS workloads grow. Quotas, also referred to as limits, are the maximum number of resources that you can create in your AWS account. For more information, see the Service Quotas User Guide.

AWSServerlessApplicationRepository

The AWS Serverless Application Repository makes it easy for developers and enterprises to quickly find
and deploy serverless applications in the AWS Cloud. For more information about serverless applications,
see Serverless Computing and Applications on the AWS website. The AWS Serverless Application Repository is deeply integrated with the AWS Lambda console, so that developers of
all levels can get started with serverless computing without needing to learn anything new. You can use category
keywords to browse for applications such as web and mobile backends, data processing applications, or chatbots.
You can also search for applications by name, publisher, or event source. To use an application, you simply choose it,
configure any required fields, and deploy it with a few clicks. You can also easily publish applications, sharing them publicly with the community at large, or privately
within your team or across your organization. To publish a serverless application (or app), you can use the
AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or AWS SDKs to upload the code. Along with the
code, you upload a simple manifest file, also known as the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) template.
For more information about AWS SAM, see AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) on the AWS Labs
GitHub repository. The AWS Serverless Application Repository Developer Guide contains more information about the two developer
experiences available:
Consuming Applications – Browse for applications and view information about them, including
source code and readme files. Also install, configure, and deploy applications of your choosing.
Publishing Applications – Configure and upload applications to make them available to other
developers, and publish new versions of applications.

Amazon Route 53 Resolver

When you create a VPC using Amazon VPC, you automatically get DNS resolution within the VPC from Route 53 Resolver. By default, Resolver answers DNS queries for VPC domain names such as domain names for EC2 instances or Elastic Load Balancing load balancers. Resolver performs recursive lookups against public name servers for all other domain names. You can also configure DNS resolution between your VPC and your network over a Direct Connect or VPN connection: Forward DNS queries from resolvers on your network to Route 53 Resolver DNS resolvers on your network can forward DNS queries to Resolver in a specified VPC. This allows your DNS resolvers to easily resolve domain names for Amazon Web Services resources such as EC2 instances or records in a Route 53 private hosted zone. For more information, see How DNS Resolvers on Your Network Forward DNS Queries to Route 53 Resolver in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. Conditionally forward queries from a VPC to resolvers on your network You can configure Resolver to forward queries that it receives from EC2 instances in your VPCs to DNS resolvers on your network. To forward selected queries, you create Resolver rules that specify the domain names for the DNS queries that you want to forward (such as example.com), and the IP addresses of the DNS resolvers on your network that you want to forward the queries to. If a query matches multiple rules (example.com, acme.example.com), Resolver chooses the rule with the most specific match (acme.example.com) and forwards the query to the IP addresses that you specified in that rule. For more information, see How Route 53 Resolver Forwards DNS Queries from Your VPCs to Your Network in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. Like Amazon VPC, Resolver is Regional. In each Region where you have VPCs, you can choose whether to forward queries from your VPCs to your network (outbound queries), from your network to your VPCs (inbound queries), or both.

AWS Direct Connect

Direct Connect links your internal network to an Direct Connect location over a standard Ethernet fiber-optic cable. One end of the cable is connected to your router, the other to an Direct Connect router. With this connection in place, you can create virtual interfaces directly to the Cloud (for example, to Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3) and to Amazon VPC, bypassing Internet service providers in your network path. A connection provides access to all Regions except the China (Beijing) and (China) Ningxia Regions. Amazon Web Services resources in the China Regions can only be accessed through locations associated with those Regions.

Amazon Route 53 Domains

Amazon Route 53 API actions let you register domain names and perform related operations.

Amazon Simple Storage Service

AWS RoboMaker

This section provides documentation for the AWS RoboMaker API operations.

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