Mock sample for your project: Amazon Personalize Events API

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Amazon Personalize Events

amazonaws.com

Version: 2018-03-22


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "Amazon Personalize Events API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs: no more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, etc.

Description

Amazon Personalize can consume real-time user event data, such as stream or click data, and use it for model training either alone or combined with historical data. For more information see Recording Events.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

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Amazon GuardDuty

Amazon GuardDuty is a continuous security monitoring service that analyzes and processes the following data sources: VPC Flow Logs, AWS CloudTrail event logs, and DNS logs. It uses threat intelligence feeds (such as lists of malicious IPs and domains) and machine learning to identify unexpected, potentially unauthorized, and malicious activity within your AWS environment. This can include issues like escalations of privileges, uses of exposed credentials, or communication with malicious IPs, URLs, or domains. For example, GuardDuty can detect compromised EC2 instances that serve malware or mine bitcoin. GuardDuty also monitors AWS account access behavior for signs of compromise. Some examples of this are unauthorized infrastructure deployments such as EC2 instances deployed in a Region that has never been used, or unusual API calls like a password policy change to reduce password strength. GuardDuty informs you of the status of your AWS environment by producing security findings that you can view in the GuardDuty console or through Amazon CloudWatch events. For more information, see the Amazon GuardDuty User Guide .

AWS IoT Events Data

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Welcome to the Amazon AppFlow API reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Amazon AppFlow API operations, data types, and errors. Amazon AppFlow is a fully managed integration service that enables you to securely transfer data between software as a service (SaaS) applications like Salesforce, Marketo, Slack, and ServiceNow, and Amazon Web Services like Amazon S3 and Amazon Redshift. Use the following links to get started on the Amazon AppFlow API: Actions : An alphabetical list of all Amazon AppFlow API operations. Data types : An alphabetical list of all Amazon AppFlow data types. Common parameters : Parameters that all Query operations can use. Common errors : Client and server errors that all operations can return. If you're new to Amazon AppFlow, we recommend that you review the Amazon AppFlow User Guide. Amazon AppFlow API users can use vendor-specific mechanisms for OAuth, and include applicable OAuth attributes (such as auth-code and redirecturi) with the connector-specific ConnectorProfileProperties when creating a new connector profile using Amazon AppFlow API operations. For example, Salesforce users can refer to the Authorize Apps with OAuth documentation.

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AWS Application Discovery Service

AWS Application Discovery Service AWS Application Discovery Service helps you plan application migration projects. It automatically identifies servers, virtual machines (VMs), and network dependencies in your on-premises data centers. For more information, see the AWS Application Discovery Service FAQ. Application Discovery Service offers three ways of performing discovery and collecting data about your on-premises servers: Agentless discovery is recommended for environments that use VMware vCenter Server. This mode doesn't require you to install an agent on each host. It does not work in non-VMware environments. Agentless discovery gathers server information regardless of the operating systems, which minimizes the time required for initial on-premises infrastructure assessment. Agentless discovery doesn't collect information about network dependencies, only agent-based discovery collects that information. Agent-based discovery collects a richer set of data than agentless discovery by using the AWS Application Discovery Agent, which you install on one or more hosts in your data center. The agent captures infrastructure and application information, including an inventory of running processes, system performance information, resource utilization, and network dependencies. The information collected by agents is secured at rest and in transit to the Application Discovery Service database in the cloud. AWS Partner Network (APN) solutions integrate with Application Discovery Service, enabling you to import details of your on-premises environment directly into Migration Hub without using the discovery connector or discovery agent. Third-party application discovery tools can query AWS Application Discovery Service, and they can write to the Application Discovery Service database using the public API. In this way, you can import data into Migration Hub and view it, so that you can associate applications with servers and track migrations. Recommendations We recommend that you use agent-based discovery for non-VMware environments, and whenever you want to collect information about network dependencies. You can run agent-based and agentless discovery simultaneously. Use agentless discovery to complete the initial infrastructure assessment quickly, and then install agents on select hosts to collect additional information. Working With This Guide This API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for Application Discovery Service. The topic for each action shows the API request parameters and the response. Alternatively, you can use one of the AWS SDKs to access an API that is tailored to the programming language or platform that you're using. For more information, see AWS SDKs. Remember that you must set your Migration Hub home region before you call any of these APIs. You must make API calls for write actions (create, notify, associate, disassociate, import, or put) while in your home region, or a HomeRegionNotSetException error is returned. API calls for read actions (list, describe, stop, and delete) are permitted outside of your home region. Although it is unlikely, the Migration Hub home region could change. If you call APIs outside the home region, an InvalidInputException is returned. You must call GetHomeRegion to obtain the latest Migration Hub home region. This guide is intended for use with the AWS Application Discovery Service User Guide. All data is handled according to the AWS Privacy Policy. You can operate Application Discovery Service offline to inspect collected data before it is shared with the service.

AWS Direct Connect

Direct Connect links your internal network to an Direct Connect location over a standard Ethernet fiber-optic cable. One end of the cable is connected to your router, the other to an Direct Connect router. With this connection in place, you can create virtual interfaces directly to the Cloud (for example, to Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3) and to Amazon VPC, bypassing Internet service providers in your network path. A connection provides access to all Regions except the China (Beijing) and (China) Ningxia Regions. Amazon Web Services resources in the China Regions can only be accessed through locations associated with those Regions.

Amazon Interactive Video Service

Introduction The Amazon Interactive Video Service (IVS) API is REST compatible, using a standard HTTP API and an AWS EventBridge event stream for responses. JSON is used for both requests and responses, including errors. The API is an AWS regional service, currently in these regions: us-west-2, us-east-1, and eu-west-1. All API request parameters and URLs are case sensitive. For a summary of notable documentation changes in each release, see Document History. Service Endpoints The following are the Amazon IVS service endpoints (all HTTPS): Region name: US West (Oregon) Region: us-west-2 Endpoint: ivs.us-west-2.amazonaws.com Region name: US East (Virginia) Region: us-east-1 Endpoint: ivs.us-east-1.amazonaws.com Region name: EU West (Dublin) Region: eu-west-1 Endpoint: ivs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com Allowed Header Values Accept: application/json Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate Content-Type: application/json Resources The following resources contain information about your IVS live stream (see Getting Started with Amazon IVS): Channel β€” Stores configuration data related to your live stream. You first create a channel and then use the channel’s stream key to start your live stream. See the Channel endpoints for more information. Stream key β€” An identifier assigned by Amazon IVS when you create a channel, which is then used to authorize streaming. See the StreamKey endpoints for more information. Treat the stream key like a secret, since it allows anyone to stream to the channel. Playback key pair β€” Video playback may be restricted using playback-authorization tokens, which use public-key encryption. A playback key pair is the public-private pair of keys used to sign and validate the playback-authorization token. See the PlaybackKeyPair endpoints for more information. Recording configuration β€” Stores configuration related to recording a live stream and where to store the recorded content. Multiple channels can reference the same recording configuration. See the Recording Configuration endpoints for more information. Tagging A tag is a metadata label that you assign to an AWS resource. A tag comprises a key and a value, both set by you. For example, you might set a tag as topic:nature to label a particular video category. See Tagging AWS Resources for more information, including restrictions that apply to tags. Tags can help you identify and organize your AWS resources. For example, you can use the same tag for different resources to indicate that they are related. You can also use tags to manage access (see Access Tags). The Amazon IVS API has these tag-related endpoints: TagResource, UntagResource, and ListTagsForResource. The following resources support tagging: Channels, Stream Keys, Playback Key Pairs, and Recording Configurations. Authentication versus Authorization Note the differences between these concepts: Authentication is about verifying identity. You need to be authenticated to sign Amazon IVS API requests. Authorization is about granting permissions. You need to be authorized to view Amazon IVS private channels. (Private channels are channels that are enabled for "playback authorization.") Authentication All Amazon IVS API requests must be authenticated with a signature. The AWS Command-Line Interface (CLI) and Amazon IVS Player SDKs take care of signing the underlying API calls for you. However, if your application calls the Amazon IVS API directly, it’s your responsibility to sign the requests. You generate a signature using valid AWS credentials that have permission to perform the requested action. For example, you must sign PutMetadata requests with a signature generated from an IAM user account that has the ivs:PutMetadata permission. For more information: Authentication and generating signatures β€” See Authenticating Requests (AWS Signature Version 4) in the AWS General Reference. Managing Amazon IVS permissions β€” See Identity and Access Management on the Security page of the Amazon IVS User Guide. Channel Endpoints CreateChannel β€” Creates a new channel and an associated stream key to start streaming. GetChannel β€” Gets the channel configuration for the specified channel ARN (Amazon Resource Name). BatchGetChannel β€” Performs GetChannel on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListChannels β€” Gets summary information about all channels in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. This list can be filtered to match a specified name or recording-configuration ARN. Filters are mutually exclusive and cannot be used together. If you try to use both filters, you will get an error (409 Conflict Exception). UpdateChannel β€” Updates a channel's configuration. This does not affect an ongoing stream of this channel. You must stop and restart the stream for the changes to take effect. DeleteChannel β€” Deletes the specified channel. StreamKey Endpoints CreateStreamKey β€” Creates a stream key, used to initiate a stream, for the specified channel ARN. GetStreamKey β€” Gets stream key information for the specified ARN. BatchGetStreamKey β€” Performs GetStreamKey on multiple ARNs simultaneously. ListStreamKeys β€” Gets summary information about stream keys for the specified channel. DeleteStreamKey β€” Deletes the stream key for the specified ARN, so it can no longer be used to stream. Stream Endpoints GetStream β€” Gets information about the active (live) stream on a specified channel. ListStreams β€” Gets summary information about live streams in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. StopStream β€” Disconnects the incoming RTMPS stream for the specified channel. Can be used in conjunction with DeleteStreamKey to prevent further streaming to a channel. PutMetadata β€” Inserts metadata into the active stream of the specified channel. A maximum of 5 requests per second per channel is allowed, each with a maximum 1 KB payload. (If 5 TPS is not sufficient for your needs, we recommend batching your data into a single PutMetadata call.) PlaybackKeyPair Endpoints For more information, see Setting Up Private Channels in the Amazon IVS User Guide. ImportPlaybackKeyPair β€” Imports the public portion of a new key pair and returns its arn and fingerprint. The privateKey can then be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels (channels enabled for playback authorization). GetPlaybackKeyPair β€” Gets a specified playback authorization key pair and returns the arn and fingerprint. The privateKey held by the caller can be used to generate viewer authorization tokens, to grant viewers access to private channels. ListPlaybackKeyPairs β€” Gets summary information about playback key pairs. DeletePlaybackKeyPair β€” Deletes a specified authorization key pair. This invalidates future viewer tokens generated using the key pair’s privateKey. RecordingConfiguration Endpoints CreateRecordingConfiguration β€” Creates a new recording configuration, used to enable recording to Amazon S3. GetRecordingConfiguration β€” Gets the recording-configuration metadata for the specified ARN. ListRecordingConfigurations β€” Gets summary information about all recording configurations in your account, in the AWS region where the API request is processed. DeleteRecordingConfiguration β€” Deletes the recording configuration for the specified ARN. AWS Tags Endpoints TagResource β€” Adds or updates tags for the AWS resource with the specified ARN. UntagResource β€” Removes tags from the resource with the specified ARN. ListTagsForResource β€” Gets information about AWS tags for the specified ARN.

Amazon Simple Email Service

Amazon Simple Email Service This document contains reference information for the Amazon Simple Email Service (Amazon SES) API, version 2010-12-01. This document is best used in conjunction with the Amazon SES Developer Guide. For a list of Amazon SES endpoints to use in service requests, see Regions and Amazon SES in the Amazon SES Developer Guide.

AWS IoT Data Plane

IoT data IoT data enables secure, bi-directional communication between Internet-connected things (such as sensors, actuators, embedded devices, or smart appliances) and the Amazon Web Services cloud. It implements a broker for applications and things to publish messages over HTTP (Publish) and retrieve, update, and delete shadows. A shadow is a persistent representation of your things and their state in the Amazon Web Services cloud. Find the endpoint address for actions in IoT data by running this CLI command: aws iot describe-endpoint --endpoint-type iot:Data-ATS The service name used by Amazon Web ServicesSignature Version 4 to sign requests is: iotdevicegateway.

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AWS OpsWorks

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