Mock sample for your project: PostgreSQLManagementClient API

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PostgreSQLManagementClient

azure.com

Version: 2020-01-01-privatepreview


Use this API in your project

Integrate third-party APIs faster by using "PostgreSQLManagementClient API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs: no more accounts to create, API keys to provision, accesses to configure, unplanned downtime, etc.

Description

The Microsoft Azure management API provides create, read, update, and delete functionality for Azure PostgreSQL resources including servers, databases, firewall rules, VNET rules, security alert policies, log files, encryption keys, active directory administrator and configurations.

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