Mock sample for your project: Azure SQL Server Backup Long Term Retention Vault API

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Azure SQL Server Backup Long Term Retention Vault

azure.com

Version: 2014-04-01


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Speed up your application development by using "Azure SQL Server Backup Long Term Retention Vault API" ready-to-use mock sample. Mocking this API will help you accelerate your development lifecycles and allow you to stop relying on an external API to get the job done. No more API keys to provision, accesses to configure or unplanned downtime, just work.
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Description

Provides read and update functionality for Azure SQL Server backup long term retention vault

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