Mock sample for your project: PostgreSQLManagementClient API

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PostgreSQLManagementClient

azure.com

Version: 2018-06-01-privatepreview


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Description

The Microsoft Azure management API provides create, read, update, and delete functionality for Azure PostgreSQL resources including servers, databases, firewall rules, VNET rules, security alert policies, log files and configurations with new business model.

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