Mock sample for your project: Amazon EC2 Container Service API

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Amazon EC2 Container Service

amazonaws.com

Version: 2014-11-13


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Description

Amazon Elastic Container Service Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) is a highly scalable, fast, container management service that makes it easy to run, stop, and manage Docker containers on a cluster. You can host your cluster on a serverless infrastructure that is managed by Amazon ECS by launching your services or tasks on Fargate. For more control, you can host your tasks on a cluster of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances that you manage. Amazon ECS makes it easy to launch and stop container-based applications with simple API calls, allows you to get the state of your cluster from a centralized service, and gives you access to many familiar Amazon EC2 features. You can use Amazon ECS to schedule the placement of containers across your cluster based on your resource needs, isolation policies, and availability requirements. Amazon ECS eliminates the need for you to operate your own cluster management and configuration management systems or worry about scaling your management infrastructure.

Other APIs by amazonaws.com

Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud

Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) provides secure and resizable computing capacity in the AWS Cloud. Using Amazon EC2 eliminates the need to invest in hardware up front, so you can develop and deploy applications faster. Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) enables you to provision a logically isolated section of the AWS Cloud where you can launch AWS resources in a virtual network that you've defined. Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) provides block level storage volumes for use with EC2 instances. EBS volumes are highly available and reliable storage volumes that can be attached to any running instance and used like a hard drive. To learn more, see the following resources: Amazon EC2: AmazonEC2 product page, Amazon EC2 documentation Amazon EBS: Amazon EBS product page, Amazon EBS documentation Amazon VPC: Amazon VPC product page, Amazon VPC documentation AWS VPN: AWS VPN product page, AWS VPN documentation

AWSKendraFrontendService

Amazon Kendra is a service for indexing large document sets.

AWS Ground Station

Welcome to the AWS Ground Station API Reference. AWS Ground Station is a fully managed service that enables you to control satellite communications, downlink and process satellite data, and scale your satellite operations efficiently and cost-effectively without having to build or manage your own ground station infrastructure.

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights

Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights Amazon CloudWatch Application Insights is a service that helps you detect common problems with your applications. It enables you to pinpoint the source of issues in your applications (built with technologies such as Microsoft IIS, .NET, and Microsoft SQL Server), by providing key insights into detected problems. After you onboard your application, CloudWatch Application Insights identifies, recommends, and sets up metrics and logs. It continuously analyzes and correlates your metrics and logs for unusual behavior to surface actionable problems with your application. For example, if your application is slow and unresponsive and leading to HTTP 500 errors in your Application Load Balancer (ALB), Application Insights informs you that a memory pressure problem with your SQL Server database is occurring. It bases this analysis on impactful metrics and log errors.

AWS License Manager

AWS License Manager AWS License Manager makes it easier to manage licenses from software vendors across multiple AWS accounts and on-premises servers.

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to run Kubernetes on Amazon Web Services without needing to stand up or maintain your own Kubernetes control plane. Kubernetes is an open-source system for automating the deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Amazon EKS runs up-to-date versions of the open-source Kubernetes software, so you can use all the existing plugins and tooling from the Kubernetes community. Applications running on Amazon EKS are fully compatible with applications running on any standard Kubernetes environment, whether running in on-premises data centers or public clouds. This means that you can easily migrate any standard Kubernetes application to Amazon EKS without any code modification required.

Firewall Management Service

This is the Firewall Manager API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Firewall Manager API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about Firewall Manager features, see the Firewall Manager Developer Guide. Some API actions require explicit resource permissions. For information, see the developer guide topic Firewall Manager required permissions for API actions.

AWS Resource Access Manager

This is the Resource Access Manager API Reference. This documentation provides descriptions and syntax for each of the actions and data types in RAM. RAM is a service that helps you securely share your Amazon Web Services resources across Amazon Web Services accounts and within your organization or organizational units (OUs) in Organizations. For supported resource types, you can also share resources with IAM roles and IAM users. If you have multiple Amazon Web Services accounts, you can use RAM to share those resources with other accounts. To learn more about RAM, see the following resources: Resource Access Manager product page Resource Access Manager User Guide

AWS Certificate Manager

Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager You can use Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager (ACM) to manage SSL/TLS certificates for your Amazon Web Services-based websites and applications. For more information about using ACM, see the Amazon Web Services Certificate Manager User Guide.

Amazon Chime

The Amazon Chime API (application programming interface) is designed for developers to perform key tasks, such as creating and managing Amazon Chime accounts, users, and Voice Connectors. This guide provides detailed information about the Amazon Chime API, including operations, types, inputs and outputs, and error codes. It also includes some server-side API actions to use with the Amazon Chime SDK. For more information about the Amazon Chime SDK, see Using the Amazon Chime SDK in the Amazon Chime Developer Guide. You can use an AWS SDK, the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI), or the REST API to make API calls. We recommend using an AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Each API operation includes links to information about using it with a language-specific AWS SDK or the AWS CLI. Using an AWS SDK You don't need to write code to calculate a signature for request authentication. The SDK clients authenticate your requests by using access keys that you provide. For more information about AWS SDKs, see the AWS Developer Center. Using the AWS CLI Use your access keys with the AWS CLI to make API calls. For information about setting up the AWS CLI, see Installing the AWS Command Line Interface in the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide. For a list of available Amazon Chime commands, see the Amazon Chime commands in the AWS CLI Command Reference. Using REST APIs If you use REST to make API calls, you must authenticate your request by providing a signature. Amazon Chime supports signature version 4. For more information, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process in the Amazon Web Services General Reference. When making REST API calls, use the service name chime and REST endpoint https://service.chime.aws.amazon.com. Administrative permissions are controlled using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM). For more information, see Identity and Access Management for Amazon Chime in the Amazon Chime Administration Guide.

AWS IoT Greengrass V2

IoT Greengrass brings local compute, messaging, data management, sync, and ML inference capabilities to edge devices. This enables devices to collect and analyze data closer to the source of information, react autonomously to local events, and communicate securely with each other on local networks. Local devices can also communicate securely with Amazon Web Services IoT Core and export IoT data to the Amazon Web Services Cloud. IoT Greengrass developers can use Lambda functions and components to create and deploy applications to fleets of edge devices for local operation. IoT Greengrass Version 2 provides a new major version of the IoT Greengrass Core software, new APIs, and a new console. Use this API reference to learn how to use the IoT Greengrass V2 API operations to manage components, manage deployments, and core devices. For more information, see What is IoT Greengrass? in the IoT Greengrass V2 Developer Guide.

AWS IoT Things Graph

AWS IoT Things Graph AWS IoT Things Graph provides an integrated set of tools that enable developers to connect devices and services that use different standards, such as units of measure and communication protocols. AWS IoT Things Graph makes it possible to build IoT applications with little to no code by connecting devices and services and defining how they interact at an abstract level. For more information about how AWS IoT Things Graph works, see the User Guide.

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Amazon Lex Runtime Service

Amazon Lex provides both build and runtime endpoints. Each endpoint provides a set of operations (API). Your conversational bot uses the runtime API to understand user utterances (user input text or voice). For example, suppose a user says "I want pizza", your bot sends this input to Amazon Lex using the runtime API. Amazon Lex recognizes that the user request is for the OrderPizza intent (one of the intents defined in the bot). Then Amazon Lex engages in user conversation on behalf of the bot to elicit required information (slot values, such as pizza size and crust type), and then performs fulfillment activity (that you configured when you created the bot). You use the build-time API to create and manage your Amazon Lex bot. For a list of build-time operations, see the build-time API, .

AWS Global Accelerator

AWS Global Accelerator This is the AWS Global Accelerator API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about AWS Global Accelerator API actions, data types, and errors. For more information about Global Accelerator features, see the AWS Global Accelerator Developer Guide. AWS Global Accelerator is a service in which you create accelerators to improve the performance of your applications for local and global users. Depending on the type of accelerator you choose, you can gain additional benefits. By using a standard accelerator, you can improve availability of your internet applications that are used by a global audience. With a standard accelerator, Global Accelerator directs traffic to optimal endpoints over the AWS global network. For other scenarios, you might choose a custom routing accelerator. With a custom routing accelerator, you can use application logic to directly map one or more users to a specific endpoint among many endpoints. Global Accelerator is a global service that supports endpoints in multiple AWS Regions but you must specify the US West (Oregon) Region to create or update accelerators. By default, Global Accelerator provides you with two static IP addresses that you associate with your accelerator. With a standard accelerator, instead of using the IP addresses that Global Accelerator provides, you can configure these entry points to be IPv4 addresses from your own IP address ranges that you bring to Global Accelerator. The static IP addresses are anycast from the AWS edge network. For a standard accelerator, they distribute incoming application traffic across multiple endpoint resources in multiple AWS Regions, which increases the availability of your applications. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses that are located in one AWS Region or multiple Regions. For custom routing accelerators, you map traffic that arrives to the static IP addresses to specific Amazon EC2 servers in endpoints that are virtual private cloud (VPC) subnets. The static IP addresses remain assigned to your accelerator for as long as it exists, even if you disable the accelerator and it no longer accepts or routes traffic. However, when you delete an accelerator, you lose the static IP addresses that are assigned to it, so you can no longer route traffic by using them. You can use IAM policies like tag-based permissions with Global Accelerator to limit the users who have permissions to delete an accelerator. For more information, see Tag-based policies. For standard accelerators, Global Accelerator uses the AWS global network to route traffic to the optimal regional endpoint based on health, client location, and policies that you configure. The service reacts instantly to changes in health or configuration to ensure that internet traffic from clients is always directed to healthy endpoints. For a list of the AWS Regions where Global Accelerator and other services are currently supported, see the AWS Region Table. AWS Global Accelerator includes the following components: Static IP addresses Global Accelerator provides you with a set of two static IP addresses that are anycast from the AWS edge network. If you bring your own IP address range to AWS (BYOIP) to use with a standard accelerator, you can instead assign IP addresses from your own pool to use with your accelerator. For more information, see Bring your own IP addresses (BYOIP) in AWS Global Accelerator. The IP addresses serve as single fixed entry points for your clients. 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There are two types of accelerators: A standard accelerator directs traffic to the optimal AWS endpoint based on several factors, including the user’s location, the health of the endpoint, and the endpoint weights that you configure. This improves the availability and performance of your applications. Endpoints can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. A custom routing accelerator directs traffic to one of possibly thousands of Amazon EC2 instances running in a single or multiple virtual private clouds (VPCs). With custom routing, listener ports are mapped to statically associate port ranges with VPC subnets, which allows Global Accelerator to determine an EC2 instance IP address at the time of connection. By default, all port mapping destinations in a VPC subnet can't receive traffic. You can choose to configure all destinations in the subnet to receive traffic, or to specify individual port mappings that can receive traffic. For more information, see Types of accelerators. DNS name Global Accelerator assigns each accelerator a default Domain Name System (DNS) name, similar to a1234567890abcdef.awsglobalaccelerator.com, that points to the static IP addresses that Global Accelerator assigns to you or that you choose from your own IP address range. Depending on the use case, you can use your accelerator's static IP addresses or DNS name to route traffic to your accelerator, or set up DNS records to route traffic using your own custom domain name. Network zone A network zone services the static IP addresses for your accelerator from a unique IP subnet. Similar to an AWS Availability Zone, a network zone is an isolated unit with its own set of physical infrastructure. When you configure an accelerator, by default, Global Accelerator allocates two IPv4 addresses for it. If one IP address from a network zone becomes unavailable due to IP address blocking by certain client networks, or network disruptions, then client applications can retry on the healthy static IP address from the other isolated network zone. Listener A listener processes inbound connections from clients to Global Accelerator, based on the port (or port range) and protocol (or protocols) that you configure. A listener can be configured for TCP, UDP, or both TCP and UDP protocols. Each listener has one or more endpoint groups associated with it, and traffic is forwarded to endpoints in one of the groups. You associate endpoint groups with listeners by specifying the Regions that you want to distribute traffic to. With a standard accelerator, traffic is distributed to optimal endpoints within the endpoint groups associated with a listener. Endpoint group Each endpoint group is associated with a specific AWS Region. Endpoint groups include one or more endpoints in the Region. With a standard accelerator, you can increase or reduce the percentage of traffic that would be otherwise directed to an endpoint group by adjusting a setting called a traffic dial. The traffic dial lets you easily do performance testing or blue/green deployment testing, for example, for new releases across different AWS Regions. Endpoint An endpoint is a resource that Global Accelerator directs traffic to. Endpoints for standard accelerators can be Network Load Balancers, Application Load Balancers, Amazon EC2 instances, or Elastic IP addresses. An Application Load Balancer endpoint can be internet-facing or internal. Traffic for standard accelerators is routed to endpoints based on the health of the endpoint along with configuration options that you choose, such as endpoint weights. For each endpoint, you can configure weights, which are numbers that you can use to specify the proportion of traffic to route to each one. 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Amazon AppIntegrations Service

The Amazon AppIntegrations service enables you to configure and reuse connections to external applications. For information about how you can use external applications with Amazon Connect, see Set up pre-built integrations in the Amazon Connect Administrator Guide.

Amazon Appflow

Welcome to the Amazon AppFlow API reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the Amazon AppFlow API operations, data types, and errors. Amazon AppFlow is a fully managed integration service that enables you to securely transfer data between software as a service (SaaS) applications like Salesforce, Marketo, Slack, and ServiceNow, and Amazon Web Services like Amazon S3 and Amazon Redshift. Use the following links to get started on the Amazon AppFlow API: Actions : An alphabetical list of all Amazon AppFlow API operations. Data types : An alphabetical list of all Amazon AppFlow data types. Common parameters : Parameters that all Query operations can use. Common errors : Client and server errors that all operations can return. If you're new to Amazon AppFlow, we recommend that you review the Amazon AppFlow User Guide. Amazon AppFlow API users can use vendor-specific mechanisms for OAuth, and include applicable OAuth attributes (such as auth-code and redirecturi) with the connector-specific ConnectorProfileProperties when creating a new connector profile using Amazon AppFlow API operations. For example, Salesforce users can refer to the Authorize Apps with OAuth documentation.

AWS Budgets

The AWS Budgets API enables you to use AWS Budgets to plan your service usage, service costs, and instance reservations. The API reference provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for each of the actions and data types for AWS Budgets. Budgets provide you with a way to see the following information: How close your plan is to your budgeted amount or to the free tier limits Your usage-to-date, including how much you've used of your Reserved Instances (RIs) Your current estimated charges from AWS, and how much your predicted usage will accrue in charges by the end of the month How much of your budget has been used AWS updates your budget status several times a day. Budgets track your unblended costs, subscriptions, refunds, and RIs. You can create the following types of budgets: Cost budgets - Plan how much you want to spend on a service. Usage budgets - Plan how much you want to use one or more services. RI utilization budgets - Define a utilization threshold, and receive alerts when your RI usage falls below that threshold. This lets you see if your RIs are unused or under-utilized. RI coverage budgets - Define a coverage threshold, and receive alerts when the number of your instance hours that are covered by RIs fall below that threshold. This lets you see how much of your instance usage is covered by a reservation. Service Endpoint The AWS Budgets API provides the following endpoint: https://budgets.amazonaws.com For information about costs that are associated with the AWS Budgets API, see AWS Cost Management Pricing.

Amazon CodeGuru Reviewer

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