Mock sample for your project: SqlManagementClient API

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SqlManagementClient

azure.com

Version: 2018-06-01-preview


Use this API in your project

Start working with "SqlManagementClient API" right away by using this ready-to-use mock sample. API mocking can greatly speed up your application development by removing all the tedious tasks or issues: API key provisioning, account creation, unplanned downtime, etc.
It also helps reduce your dependency on third-party APIs and improves your integration tests' quality and reliability by accounting for random failures, slow response time, etc.

Description

The Azure SQL Database management API provides a RESTful set of web APIs that interact with Azure SQL Database services to manage your databases. The API enables users to create, retrieve, update, and delete databases, servers, and other entities.

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